November 18th, 2018

Real-World Reviews of Caldwell Target Cam by Forum Members

caldwell long range target cam system forum accurateshooter.com review

We’ve used a variety of target cam systems — When you get a good one, they are a great tool for training and load development, and just fun shooting.

Over the past five years we’ve tested many target cam systems. To be frank, some have been disappointing, but we think the Caldwell Target Cam System works well. A number of our Forum members have purchased this system and the reviews have been generally quite positive — image quality is good, reception is good, software is good, and storage cases work well. The only complaint is that the flexible camera arm can droop with time. READ Target Cam Forum Reviews.

Caldwell Target Cam Review by Nando-AS
“I have been using the Caldwell camera for over a year and it works great for me in every respect. I use it mainly at 600 yards, but I have also used it at 1000 yards successfully. In my case, as opposed to the experience posted by Snakepit (see below), the flexible arm that supports the camera is as tight as when it was brand new. The only thing that has broken so far is the plastic top on one of the two stakes supplied to steady the tripods to the ground. Instead of the stakes, I now use a couple of heavy shooting bags. I just place one bag over one of the legs of the tripod, and that is good enough.”

Target Cam Output with camera placed 600 yards from shooter:
caldwell long range target cam system forum accurateshooter.com review

Target Cam view at 600 yards: Blue ring is three inches, outer circle is six inches. I use a Samsung Tablet to display the image. I zoom in when actually shooting — so each target fills the screen.

Caldwell Target Cam Review by Shoot4Fun
“Caldwell Target Camera owner here. It comes neatly packed in a soft case and even has two stands for the camera/transmitter and the receiver units. I have only used it to 500 yards though they do call it a one-mile system. The resolution is very good and it has some neat features for capturing and labeling your targets. I did buy two Tallantcell USB packs to power it but it has internal batteries as well. The App works with my iPad or my iPhone and I’m sure there is an Android version too. I see them on sale from time to time at under $375 complete.”

Caldwell Target Cam Review by SnakePit
“I have the Caldwell Target Camera system and it works great. I mainly use it at 600 yards and the transmitter has enough power that I do not have to use the receiver at the bench for my tablet or cell phone. But Caldwell needs to do something with the flexible arm that holds the camera to the tripod. It becomes loose after a while and the camera wants to droop down. Caldwell sent me a replacement flexible arm but it is starting to have the same problem. You can get it to work when this happens but it can be a hassle. Other than that it is a great system for the price and I would buy another one.”

Important Features of a Target Cam System
Key qualities you’ll want in a target cam system are: ease of set-up, good video resolution, effective range (good signal quality/strength), good battery run-time, and the ability to use WiFi-enabled devices for viewing. Caldwell’s new Long-Range Target Camera offers all these things, making it an impressive new product for the price — $359.95 at Midsouth Shooters Supply. Some other target cam systems on the market cost twice as much, yet lack key features of the Caldwell system.

Watch Video, Record Video, Capture Stills, Measure Group Size and more…
The Caldwell LR Target Camera is very versatile, allowing you to both watch and record video and/or stills on any WiFi-enabled device. A free iOS/Android Mobile App allows you to record video, save still pictures, add notes, calculate group size, and save session info. This video shows the complete set-up process and how to use the free App. It shows actual Target Cam output on a WiFi-enabled tablet:

Caldwell Ballistic Precision LR Target Camera

    Caldwell LR Target Camera Features:
    — High Definition (720p) camera delivers sharp image with good detail.
    — WiFi output is compatible with Android, iPhone and most tablets.
    — System can stream live HD video, record video, and save still images.
    — Camera, transmitter, and receiver are contained in sturdy, waterproof housings.
    — Breaks down into custom-fitted storage case for easy transport.
    — Rechargeable Lithium-Ion batteries run system for up to 6 hours continuously.
    — External power jack for more permanent installation.
    — Target Camera Mobile App for iOS and Android devices.
    — Includes two collapsible, tripod-base Antenna/router stands.
    — Positionable, spring-loaded camera clamp.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Tech Tip Post comment »
November 18th, 2018

Out-of-Control Gun Lust — “I May Need an Intervention!”

Hoarding AccurateShooter Forum AR

Forum member Kevin (aka “N10Sivern”), revealed he needs some help with a compulsion — a compulsion to keep buying more and more guns and ammo. Particularly ARs, all shapes and sizes of ARs. Way too many ARs. You could say he has an ARdiction….

In a Forum Thread, Kevin posted: “I may need an intervention. Trying to clean my office and pulled this stuff out. I’m missing an AR10 lower somewhere and an AR15 upper. I’ll find them before the day is done. I have a big box full of parts as well, and 4 barrels still in the cardboard tubes. Sigh. This is gonna be a lot of Cerakoting for me.”

Another Forum member said: “For the love of God, man. Delete this thread lest you be accused of hoarding!”

Kevin replied: “I guess I am hoarding a little. But it’s good hoarding right?”

And then he posted this “Mail Call” photo:

Hoarding AccurateShooter Forum AR

Kevin’s caption: “It only gets worse. Mail Call today: 20″ .308 Ballistics Advantage barrel, 26″ Savage 25-06 barrel, 700 pieces of .38 special, 300 pieces of .357 magnum, 500 pieces .308 Win, gas tube, Hornady Modified Case Gauge. I have more crap on the way too.”

Forum Member’s Chime In…
Kevin’s “Need Intervention” post drew plenty of comments from other Forum Members:

“God! It is so refreshing to see that my illness is widespread with little hope (or desire) for a cure. I smiled reading each post.” — Gary0529

“You know you have a problem when you open a drawer and find components you forgot you bought.” — JoshB

“It’s not hoarding if you intend to use it. Says he who has 12,000 primers.” — Uthink

“I guess I’ll go ahead and volunteer to help you with your obviously much needed intervention… send me the pictured items and then you’ll no longer have to deal with those nasty temptations. Just think about it, you’ll have less clutter in your office plus you’ll not have to fret over the need for any cerakoting either. I’m just one human being volunteering to help out another fellow human being who needs help!” — PikesPG

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tactical 1 Comment »
November 18th, 2018

Coast Guard Pistolero Dominates CMP New England Games

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

This fall in Vermont, Coast Guard Petty Officer First Class (PO1) Charlie Petrotto proved he is one of the nation’s top pistol shooters. At the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) New England Travel Games, held at the Camp Ethan Allen in Vermont in September, 34-year-old PO1 Petrotto won every single pistol competition during the event. As the “Top Gun” in every pistol match, Petrotto took home SEVEN plaques for his pistol marksmanship — a remarkable trophy haul.

Report based on story by Ashley Brugnone, CMP Writer
At the 2018 New England Games, Charlie Petrotto swept all the pistol events. Competitors during the pistol events saw the skies open up to periodic rain showers, but, according to Petrotto, the biggest challenge wasn’t the precipitation so much as the darkness brought on from the clouds overhead.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

That created a challenge he explained, “Obviously you need to be hard on your front sights and smooth on the trigger, and it was hard to do the first part, so it was hard to get on your sights and stay on your sights – the target was so bright, and your sights were so dark. It was easy to just jump to the target. I shot a couple of 7’s that way, not paying attention to my sights.” Though adequately tested, he captured each win during the weekend.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Charlie Petrotto Vermont pistol travel games CMP winner handgun bullseye

Petrotto is passionate about marksmanship. He’s a Coast Guard Petty Officer First Class (Gunners Mate) currently stationed at the Coast Guard Academy. There he studies marksmanship and works with cadets and Officer Candidate School (OCS) candidates.

Being stationed at the Coast Guard Academy has definitely helped Petrotto’s skill set: “It’s really a fortunate opportunity,” he said. “I get to come in early to work, we have a range where I shoot air pistol, I shoot free pistol, .45, .22 – all the things – before we have a cup of coffee and get to work. With that, we really get to do a lot of shooting,” he said with a grin.

Petrotto has achieved both Pistol and Rifle Distinguished badges. And he has reached the President’s Hundred in pistol at the Camp Perry National Matches four years running. Petrotto’s love for marksmanship competition began when he was in A-school in the Coast Guard. Looking through a manual he saw a picture of the Distinguished Badges. He photocopied the pages, put them in his locker and told himself, “I have to get that.” And he did — he is now double-distinguished in both pistol and rifle.

READ Full Story on CMP Website HERE »

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November 17th, 2018

Case Grip on Bullet — There’s More to Neck Tension Than Just Bushing Size

case neck bushing reloading die tension bullet release

Many novice hand-loaders believe that neck bushing Inside Diameter (ID) size is the only important factor in neck tension. In fact, many different things will influence the grip on your bullet and its ability to release from the case neck. To learn more about neck tension and “case grip”, take the time to read this article carefully. We bet you’ll gain knowledge that will let you load more accurate ammo, with better ES/SD.

Neck Tension (i.e. Grip on Bullets) Is a Complex Phenomenon
While we certainly have considerable control over neck tension by using tighter or looser bushings (with smaller or bigger Inside Diameters), bushing size is only one factor at work. It’s important to understand the multiple factors that can increase or decrease the resistance to bullet release. Think in terms of overall brass-on-bullet “grip” instead of just bushing size (or the internal neck diameter in non-bushing full-length sizing dies).

Bullet grip is affected by many things, such as:

1. Neck-wall thickness.
2. Amount of bullet bearing surface (shank) in the neck.
3. Surface condition inside of neck (residual carbon can act as a lubricant; ultrasonic cleaning makes necks “grabby”).
4. Length of neck (e.g. 6mmBR neck vs. 6mm Dasher).
5. Whether or not the bullets have an anti-friction coating.
6.The springiness of the brass (which is related to degree of work-hardening; number of firings etc.)
7. The bullet jacket material.
8. The outside diameter of the bullet and whether it has a pressure ridge.
9. Time duration between bullet seating and firing (necks can stiffen with time).
10. How often the brass is annealed.
11. Amount (length) of neck sized (e.g. you can size only half the neck).
12. Interior diameter of bushing, or neck section of non-bushing die.

— and there are others…

One needs to understand that bushing size isn’t the beginning and end of neck tension questions, because, even if bushing size is held constant, the amount of bullet “grip” can change dramatically as the condition of your brass changes. Bullet “grip” can also change if you alter your seating depth, and it can even change if you ultrasonically clean your cases.

Redding neck bushingsIn our Shooters’ Forum a reader recently asked: “How much neck tension should I use?” This prompted a Forum discussion in which other Forum members recommended a specific number based on their experience, such as .001″, .002″, or .003″. These numbers, as commonly used, correspond to the difference between case-neck OD after sizing and the neck OD of a loaded round, with bullet in place. In other words, the numbers refer to the nominal amount of interference fit (after sizing).

While these commonly-used “tension numbers” (of .001″, .002″ etc.) can be useful as starting points, neck tension is actually a fairly complex subject. The actual amount of “grip” on the bullet is a function of many factors, of which neck-OD reduction during sizing is just one. Understanding these many factors will help you maintain consistent neck tension as your brass “evolves” over the course of multiple reloadings.

Seating Depth Changes Can Increase or Decrease Grip on Bullet
You can do this simple experiment. Seat a boat-tail bullet in your sized neck with .150″ of bearing surface (shank) in the neck. Now remove the bullet with an impact hammer. Next, take another identical bullet and seat it with .300″ of bearing surface in another sized case (same bushing size/same nominal tension). You’ll find the deeper-seated bullet is gripped much harder.

PPC lapua brassNeck-Wall Thickness is Important Too
I have also found that thinner necks, particularly the very thin necks used by many PPC shooters, require more sizing to give equivalent “grip”. Again, do your own experiment. Seat a bullet in a case turned to .008″ neckwall thickness and sized down .003″. Now compare that to a case with .014″ neckwall thickness and sized down .0015″. You may find that the bullet in the thin necks actually pulls out easier, though it supposedly has more “neck tension”, if one were to consider bushing size alone.

In practical terms, because thick necks are less elastic than very thin necks, when you turn necks you may need to run tighter bushings to maintain the same amount of actual grip on the bullets (as compared to no-turn brass). Consequently, I suspect the guys using .0015″ “tension” on no-turn brass may be a lot closer to the guys using .003″ “tension” on turned necks than either group may realize.

Toward a Better Definition of Neck Tension
As a convenient short-cut, we tend to describe neck tension by bushing size alone. When a guy says, “I run .002 neck tension”, that normally means he is using a die/bushing that sizes the necks .002″ smaller than a loaded round. Well we know something about his post-sizing neck OD, but do we really have a reliable idea about how much force is required to release his bullets? Maybe not… This use of the term “neck tension” when we are really only describing the amount of neck diameter reduction with a die/bushing is really kind of incomplete.

My point here is that it is overly simplistic to ask, “should I load with .001 tension or .003?” In reality, an .001″ reduction (after springback) on a thick neck might provide MORE “grip” on a deep-seated bullet than an .003″ reduction on a very thin-walled neck holding a bullet with minimal bearing surface in the neck. Bushing ID is something we can easily measure and verify. We use bushing size as a descriptor of neck tension because it is convenient and because the other important factors are hard to quantify. But those factors shouldn’t be ignored if you want to maintain consistent neck tension for optimal accuracy.

Consistency and accuracy — that’s really what this all about isn’t it? We want to find the best neck tension for accuracy, and then maintain that amount of grip-on-bullet over time. To do that you need to look not only at your bushing size, but also at how your brass has changed (work-hardened) with time, and whether other variables (such as the amount of carbon in the neck) have changed. Ultimately, optimal neck tension must be ascertained experimentally. You have to go out and test empirically to see what works, in YOUR rifle, with YOUR bullets and YOUR brass. And you may have to change the nominal tension setting (i.e. bushing size) as your brass work-hardens or IF YOU CHANGE SEATING DEPTHS.

Remember that bushing size alone does not tell us all we need to know about the neck’s true “holding power” on a bullet, or the energy required for bullet release. True bullet grip is a more complicated phenomenon, one that is affected by numerous factors, some of which are very hard to quantify.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
November 17th, 2018

Get FREE Reloading Data Sheets and Ammo Box Label Templates

Reloading Data Form Ammo Box Template printing labels chronograph data sheet

Redding Reloading offers handy Handloader’s Data Sheets in printable PDF format. This FREE form allows hand-loaders to document their tool settings, bushing size, powder charge, load specs (COAL etc.), and case prep status. In addition, the form allows you to enter your load testing information, complete with chronograph data, group size, zero range, and wind/temp conditions. With this single, handy form you can document all the vital information for your particular cartridges and loads. We suggest you print these out, 3-hole-punch ‘em, and then keep them in a three-ring binder.

Download FREE Handloader’s Data Sheet (PDF)

We’ve seen various reloading log templates, but this Redding form (shown below) is better than most because it combines both reloading data AND range-test data in one place. You can see all key details of the reloading process (tool settings etc.) plus the end results — how the load actually performed over the chronograph and on paper. This form allows the user to capture a large amount of information for later use, while accurately track load development. Go to Download Page.

Reloading Data Form Ammo Box Template printing labels chronograph data sheet

FREE Ammunition Box Label Template
Reloading Data Form Ammo Box Template printing labels chronograph data sheetRedding Reloading has also developed a printable template for your ammo boxes (see photo at top of article). This lets you put all vital load info on your ammo boxes. There are fields for: Date, Cartridge, Powder, Grains, Bullet, Weight, Primer, Case type. Designed for Avery 5260 (or similar) label sheets, this template allows you to print 30 labels at one time. You can purchase the Avery 5260 peel-off printable label sheets at any office supply store.

Download Box Label Template (PDF)

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »
November 17th, 2018

Make Your Own Ammo Caddy with Wood Knife-Holder Block

Wood Knife Holder ammo caddy

Forum member Alex W. (aka “zfastmalibu”) came up with a clever adaptation of an item you may already have on your kitchen counter. By drilling a few strategically-placed holes in a wood knife-holding block, Alex created a handy, 20-round ammo holder for the bench. We’re not sure the wife will appreciate the new holes in her kitchen accessory, but we think this is a smart invention. Alex asked fellow Forum members: “What do you think, is there a market for it?” We think there is. Of course, with a ruler and an electric drill you could probably make your own version easily enough.

Get a Solid Wood Knife Block for under $25.00
Hardwood Knife blocks can be purchased for under $25.00 through Amazon.com. They are also available in bamboo ($18.14), beechwood ($39.95), acacia ($49.95), and solid walnut ($59.95).

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November 16th, 2018

SAF & NRA File Lawsuit Challenging Washington Initiative 1639

lawsuit I-1639 Initiative Washington state lawsuit second amendment foundation NRA

The Second Amendment Foundation and National Rifle Association have filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging gun control Initiative 1639 in Washington State, on several grounds. The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington. In addition to SAF and NRA, plaintiffs include gun dealers and young adults in the affected age group.

The lawsuit challenges the measure on the grounds that it violates the commerce clause by banning sales of rifles to non-residents, and that it unconstitutionally impairs the rights guaranteed by the First, Second and Fourteenth Amendments, and Article I Section 24 of the Washington State constitution by preventing the sale to otherwise qualified adults under age 21 of certain rifles.

“We are also considering additional legal challenges,” SAF Executive Vice President Alan Gottlieb confirmed. “We are disappointed that too many Evergreen State voters were fooled into supporting this 30-page gun control scheme, despite overwhelming law enforcement opposition. This initiative is an affront to the constitutional rights enshrined in the Second Amendment and the Washington state constitution[.]”

“We’re determined to fight this egregious measure because constitutionally-protected rights should never be subject to a popularity vote,” he stated. “The wealthy elitists behind I-1639 want to turn a right into a regulated privilege. This measure was only designed to have a chilling effect on the exercise of a constitutional right by honest citizens while having no impact at all on criminals, and we cannot let it go unchallenged.”

I-1639, over 30 pages in length, is far-reaching. This measure basically defines virtually ALL self-loading long guns as “assault rifles”. This would even include popular .22 LR rimfire rifles such as the Ruger 10/22, Marlin 60, and Remington 597. In addition, I-1639 imposes draconian gun storage requirements, imposes new taxes on gun ownership, creates a state-controlled gun registry, and mandates annual “verification” of gun owners. LEARN MORE HERE.

“The NRA is committed to restoring the Second Amendment rights of every law-abiding Washingtonian,” said Chris W. Cox, executive director of NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action. “I-1639 violates the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens and puts people at risk. This lawsuit is the first step in the fight to ensure that Washingtonians are free to exercise their fundamental right to self-defense.”

“The NRA will fight to overturn this unconstitutional initiative. We will not sit idly by while elitist anti-gun activists attempt to deny everyday Americans their fundamental right to self-defense,” concluded Cox.

lawsuit I-1639 Initiative Washington state

The Second Amendment Foundation (www.saf.org) is the nation’s oldest and largest tax-exempt education, research, publishing and legal action group focusing on the Constitutional right and heritage to privately own and possess firearms. Founded in 1974, The Foundation has grown to more than 650,000 members and supporters and conducts many programs designed to better inform the public about the consequences of gun control.

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November 16th, 2018

Find Rimfire Ammo Bargains at AmmoSeek.com

Ammoseek.com

In the “good old days”, if you needed rimfire ammo for fun shooting, you could just head over to Walmart (or a local sporting goods store) and find a wide variety of offerings, including low-cost bulk packs from Federal, CCI, and Remington. In recent years, affordable .22 LR has been harder to come by. But thankfully, starting in 2017, we have seen rimfire ammo supply catch up with demand. Plus there has been less hording by nervous buyers. That means .22 LR ammo prices have become more reasonable and much more product is on the shelves. Still, you want to comparison shop to get the best deals.

One of the most efficient ways to locate rimfire ammunition nationwide is to use Ammoseek.com, a specialized search engine. On its home page, Ammoseek has a handy 22LR PAGE link. With just one click you can search dozens of ammo vendors.

If you click Ammoseek’s 22LR Page link, Ammoseek instantly calls up current ammo inventories from dozens of vendors. Then Ammoseek plots ALL the available rimfire ammo, sorted from least expensive to most expensive. Here are search results from this morning, November 16, 2018. We found some Remington 40gr LRN for just 2.4 cents per round (in 500-rd bulk pack). That’s a heck of a deal.

Ammoseek rimfire ammo ammunition .22 LR 22LR

SK Rebate Now Through December 31, 2018
SK makes excellent rimfire ammo, and now there’s a Holiday Special that makes SK even more attractive. Now you can get $5 cash back per 500-rd brick, up to $100. The offer is valid on qualifying SK rimfire ammunition brick purchases from November 15 to December 31, 2018.

SK .22 LR Rimfire ammo deal holiday rebate

To take advantage of this offer, get the REBATE FORM at your local SK retailer or download the rebate form at www.Capstonepg.com/skrebate. The clip the UPC/Lot codes from the SK ammo box and mail them, along with the original sales receipt, no later than January 31, 2019. This deal is good for purchases through the end of the year. Additional conditions apply — see Capstone website for details.

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November 16th, 2018

Cheap Tricks — Ten Handy Budget Items For Hand-Loaders

Budget reloading items

Useful reloading gear does not have to be costly. Here are ten handy (and very inexpensive) items that belong on your loading bench or in your range kit.

magnifying glassMagnifying Glass – We use a flat, 2″x2″ pocket 4x-8x magnifier. This folds up on itself. Very handy, we use it to inspect bullets and brass. Use this to check your flash holes for burrs, and check the meplats of your bullets before loading.

Clear 35mm Film Cannister – Use this to transfer the thrown powder charge to the little measuring cup that sits on your scale. That way you don’t get any kernel splash. Also if the charge weight is obviously off, it’s easy to dump back in the measure. A film canister works pretty well as a trickler too.

Compressed Air in a Can -- Get these at office supply stores. Use the can (with tube attached) to blow crud out of cases after cleaning the neck with a brush, and blast loose debris out of primer pockets.

Pin Vise – A simple $7.00 pin vise with a #53 bit is perfect for deburring Lapua PPC and BR flash holes without reaming the flash-holes any larger. The Lapua PPC/BR flash-hole diameter is 1.5 mm, or 0.059″. Amazon.com sells a handy $6.99 pin vise kit with ten (10) bits, including the ideal 1.5mm bit. Other vendors offer a #53 pin vise bit that measures .0595″ or .060″ (depending or source). You can find pin vises and bits at hobby stores.

pin vise 1.5mm Lapua Flash hole

Bounce Dryer Sheets – The common dryer sheets eliminate “static cling” on your plastic reloading parts such as powder measure cylinders, powder funnels, and reloading press plastic bins. Thanks to Doc76251 for this tip.

BallistolBallistol Aerosol – Try using this versatile lubricant/solvent for full-length sizing. Spray some on a patch and you can wipe the carbon of your case necks. Then, continue to apply a very small amount of Ballistol on the case bodies — just thin sheen is all you need. Ballistol is super slippery, and easy to remove. For general full-length sizing (on small cases) it works great and doesn’t leave a gooey, waxy, or chalky residue. For heavier case-forming jobs, we recommend Imperial Die Wax.

Shotgun Mop – Stick this in the chamber when using Wipe-Out foaming bore cleaner. This will seal off the chamber so the foam doesn’t flow into your action. For long chambers screw on one section of cleaning rod to aid extraction.

Colored Sharpie Marking Pens – Mark your bullets ahead of the bearing surface, and the color transfers to the target. This way you can shoot multiple loads at the same point of aim and discern which load shoots the tightest. (Recommended for 300 yards and beyond). With colored bullet tips you can test multiple loads “round robin” to equalize wind effects. When testing seating depths for example, you can mark the longer-seated set of bullets red and the shorter-seated set green and shoot them during the same sequence. Just look at the colored marks on the target to see which grouped better.

Sharpies Pens

Thin Latex Gloves – You should keep a box of inexpensive, disposable latex gloves (the kind doctors use) in your loading room. These will prevent contamination of primers or powder kernels that you handle directly. Also, use the gloves when handling fine blued tools or firearms to prevent transfering body oils and salts that promote rust.

Plastic Washers for Neck Mic – If you use a Sinclair Neck-wall Micrometer Gauge with integral stand, you can use thin plastic washers to adjust the height of the case on the mandrel. This makes it much easier to measure the same point on the case neck every time. Thanks to MikeCR for this tip (and photo).

Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip Post comment »
November 15th, 2018

Love at First Shot Season 5 — Top Ladies ‘Shoot Like a Girl’

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

Many of the nation’s top female shooters are featured in the NRA video series, “Love at First Shot”. Now entering its fifth season, the series introduces a new competition this season — the Pro-Am Challenge. This new event matches top female pros with amateur ladies in action shooting competitions, testing both their shooting skills and their teamwork in 2 on 2 pair competition.

Season Five premieres Friday November 16 on the NRA Women Facebook Page at 8:00 PM Eastern Time. There will be six episodes total, running six weeks through December 21, 2018. After each episode airs on Facebook, you can watch the show on NRAwomen.TV.

Watch Love at First Shot Season 5 Trailer (Plenty of Action):

Get a sneak peek at the season premiere of Love at First Shot featuring host Natalie Foster and Julie Golob of Team Smith & Wesson Corp.

Eight women. Four teams. Love at First Shot Season 5 pairs pro shooters with amateur shooters in a Pro-Am Challenge that provides for great competition and comraderie. Hosts Natalie Foster and Julie Golob lead the lady shooters through five challenging stages. Each course of fire was created by world-champion shooter Golob to test skill, accuracy, speed and teamwork.

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

The talented Season 5 cast members have a wide variety of backgrounds:

Breann Bates
Conservative student activist

Kaitlin Clark
Social media strategist

Cheyenne Dalton
Rimfire and 3-Gun competitor

Annette Evans
USPSA, 3-Gun and IDPA competitor

Alisha James
Former law enforcement officer

Janna Reeves
3-Gun competitor

Emily Valentine
Creator of Style Me Tactical

Becky Yackley
3-Gun competitor

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

The Season Premiere of Love at First Shot is Friday, November 16, and the episode will air live on the NRA Women Facebook page at 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT. New episodes will debut on Facebook live every Friday at the same time for six straight weeks, concluding on Friday, December 21. After each episode airs live on NRA Women Facebook, it will then become available for viewing on NRAWomen.TV, NRATV.com, and Apple TV and Roku via the NRATV app.

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November 15th, 2018

Sectional Density of Bullets — What You Need to Know

Bullet projectile sectional density formula Sierra Bullets

by Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Paul Box
All of us who have been in reloading and shooting for any period of time have read how sectional density has been regarded as a bullet’s ability to penetrate. Back before high velocity came along and modern bullet design, the easiest way to get more “power” and penetration was by increasing the diameter and mass. After all, a bowling ball will hurt more than a golf ball, right?

Let’s take a closer look at sectional density.

The formula for calculating sectional density is pretty simple and straight forward. Take the bullet weight and divide by 7000. This number is then divided by the bullet diameter squared. Two bullets of equal weight and the same diameter will have equal sectional sectional density. No regard is given to the bullet construction. This is where the fly hits the soup in considering sectional density as far as penetration is concerned.

Section Density Formula: (Bullet Weight divided by 7000) divided by Bullet Diameter squared.

Bullet construction is the biggest factor in how it is able to penetrate. The best example I can think of here is to look at the Sierra .224 55 Gr. FMJBT GameKing #1355 compared to the 55 Gr. BlitzKing #1455. Both are .224 and weigh 55 grs. Both have a sectional density of .157. But there is a huge difference in their construction. The FMJ has a thick jacket and is designed to penetrate. The BlitzKing is designed for fast and rapid expansion with little concern for how deep they will penetrate.

The next time you’re choosing a bullet, look at the construction and less at the sectional density number. It’s all about the construction anyway. If you have any questions or would like to discuss sectional density or bullet penetration further, please give us a call at 800-223-8799 or shoot us an email at sierra@sierrabullets.com.

Sierra Bullets reloading tips

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November 15th, 2018

Tool Time: Sinclair Cartridge Case Neck Sorting Tool

Case Neck thickness sorting gauge Sinclair accurateshooter.com

He who dies with the most toys wins — right? Well Sinclair has another interesting gadget you can add to your reloading bench. The Sinclair Case Neck Sorting Tool lets you quickly sort brass by neck-wall thickness. For those who shoot “no-turn” brass, this can improve neck-tension consistency. Large variances in neck-wall thickness can cause inconsistent neck “grip” on the bullet. Generally, we’ve found that more consistent neck tension will lower ES and (usually) improve accuracy. We know some guys who shoot no-turn 6mmBR brass in competition with considerable success — but their secret is pre-sorting their brass by neck-wall thickness. Cases that are out-of-spec are set aside for sighters (or are later skim-turned).

Watch Case Neck Sorting Tool Operation in Video

Case Neck thickness sorting gauge Sinclair accurateshooterHow the Case Neck Sorting Tool Works
Here’s how the Sinclair tool works. Cases are rotated under an indicator tip while they are supported on a case-neck pilot and a support pin through the flash hole. The unit has a nice, wide base and low profile so it is stable in use. The tool works for .22 through .45 caliber cases and can be used on .17- and .20-caliber cases with the optional carbide alignment rod. The MIC-4 pin fits both .060 (PPC size) and .080 (standard size) flash holes. Sinclair’s Case Neck Sorting Tool can be ordered with or without a dial indicator. The basic unit without dial indicator (item 749-006-612WB) is $59.99. The tool complete with dial indicator (item 749-007-129WB) for $89.99. IMPORTANT: This tool requires caliber-specific Sinclair Case Neck Pilots which must be ordered separately.

Editor’s Comment: The purpose of this Sinclair tool is rapid, high-quantity sorting of cartridge brass to ascertain significant case-neck-wall thickness variations. Consider this a rapid culling/sorting tool. If you are turning your necks, you will still need a quality ball micrometer tool to measure neck-wall thickness (to .0005) before and after neck-turning operations.

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November 14th, 2018

Brawl at Rifles Only on Shooting USA TV This Week

ShootingUSA Bushnell brawl Impossible Shots

This Wednesday, November 14th, Shooting USA TV features The Brawl at Rifles Only, a tactical competition that draws top long-range shooters from military, law enforcement and civilian shooting communities. The match is held at the famed Rifles Only range in Kingsville, Texas. The Brawl is a one-of-a-kind physical and mental challenge that tests shooters’ abilities to read wind, figure ballistics, and adapt to difficult shooting scenarios. There is even a helicopter stage. This Shooting USA episode airs on the Outdoor Channel at 9:00 pm Eastern and Pacific, 8:00 pm Central.

ShootingUSA Bushnell brawl rifles only Impossible Shots

Helicopter Stage at 2014 Brawl in Texas:

Shooting from a helicopter, shooting off of a wire, and shooting from the physically demanding maze called the Mouse Trap. These are just a few of the unique courses of fire at the Bushnell Brawl, part of the PRS series. Over the course of two days, competitors tackle more than a dozen stages. In addition, Bushnell hosted a special one-day event for the new PRS Production Class. This new division should attract new shooters by limiting the cost of equipment — making PRS competition more affordable.

This image is from The Brawl Barricade Stage (CLICK HERE to Watch Barricade Video):
Bushnell Brawl PRS tactical texas barricade

PRS Production Division — Lowering the Cost of Entry

The Production Division is a new PRS classification. Under Production Division rules, the rifle must not exceed $2000.00, and rifle + scope combined must not exceed $4000.00. All other accessories, such as bipod, support bag, and the sling, can be added at the shooter’s own discretion. Even with these cost limits, you can put together a great rig: “There’s a lot of gear out there that’s not that expensive,” says Production Division Match Director Jacob Bynum. For example, you can get the new Howa KRG Bravo in 6.5 Creedmoor for $979.99. With an $800 Nikon FX1000 FFP MRAD optic, and $109 Game Changer Bag, you’re good to go for well under $2000.00 complete. Here’s the Howa KRG Bravo:

Howa 1500 krg bravo tactical rifle

Shooting USA Hour on Wednesday Primetime

9:00 PM Eastern and Pacific
8:00 PM Central Time

Permalink - Videos, Competition, Tactical 1 Comment »
November 14th, 2018

Get NRA Life Membership for $600 or Save 33% on 5-Year Plan

NRA discount $600 free life member membership offer Shooting USA

Here’s a good deal if you have been considering an NRA Life Membership. Right now you can get the NRA Life Membership for $600.00 — that’s a $900 savings over the regular $1500.00 NRA price.

This a special offer through our friends at Shooting USA television. NOTE: The shorter term 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year NRA memberships are also discounted. For example the 5-year membership is discounted 33% to $100.00, a $50 savings, while the basic 1-year membership is discounted to $30.00, a $15 savings.

CLICK HERE for $600.00 NRA Life Membership Offer »

No FREE NRA Insurance — That’s a Change
Please note, the NRA membership no longer includes $2500.00 in free ArmsCare Insurance for your firearms. The NRA stopped offering this insurance earlier this year, some time in May as best as we can determine. The NRA has not issued an explanation for the change in insurance availability. However it may be related to actions by the State of New York. The NRA is suing New York, claiming state officials coerced banks and insurance companies to withhold services from the NRA. (READ Story Here).

We wish the NRA would issue an official statement about insurance. However, we advise our readers to please take note that you will NOT get free Armscare insurance with any newly purchased NRA membership, even a Life Membership. Got that?

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November 14th, 2018

Winter Reminder: Check the Batteries in Your GunSafe Keypad

If the battery on your safe’s electronic lock is
more than a year old, or if it is not giving you the
right voltage, replace it today!

safe battery gunsafe sargent greenleaf

Gunsafe safe keypad control battery batteriesThis time of year, many of our readers are putting their guns away in a safe for the winter. It’s easy to just tuck the guns away and forget about them. But there’s something you should do before you shut the safe door. If you have a safe with an electronic keypad, you should replace the battery every year as a precautionary measure. Trust us, you don’t want to come back in a few months and find that the keypad memory is kaput, and you’re locked out. That can lead to frustration and an expensive locksmith visit.

Here’s a true story. I have one safe with a Sargent & Greenleaf (S&G) keypad. A couple years back, in early December, I went to get into the safe. I punched in the correct combination, but all I got was a rapid “beep, beep, beep, beep” after I finished the last combination entry. I tried again to ensure I entered the combination correctly (I did). But again, the locking system responded with multiple rapid beeps indicating something was wrong. And the safe would not open. Now I was worried….

I popped out the battery holder (which slides in from the bottom of the keypad housing on the door). I removed the battery and tested it with a volt-meter. The 12-month-old Duracell 9-volt battery only registered 6.1 volts.

Low voltage was the problem. I went down to the store and got a couple new 9V batteries. I tested the new batteries and both measured 9.4 volts output. I slipped one of the new 9V batteries into the keypad housing, punched in the combination and everything worked OK again. Eureka.

Most electronic locks for safes WILL “remember” the combination for a period of time even when the battery is low (and the keypad’s “brain” should retain the combination when you remove the battery for replacement). However, a dead battery, or extended periods of low voltage can give you problems. Don’t rely on wishful thinking…

Permalink News, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
November 13th, 2018

CZ 455 .22 LR Varmint Precision Trainer in Manners Stock

CZ  455 rimfire precision PRS trainer .22 LR smallbore video TFBTV manners stock

Rimfire cross-training allows PRS competitors to build their skill sets without breaking the bank (or burning out nice custom barrels). One great .22 LR option for cross-training is offered by CZ (Česká Zbrojovka), the Czech arms-maker. The TFBTV video below spotlights the CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer (VPT), a smooth-running .22 LR bolt action. This factory rifle was designed specifically as a training tool for precision long-range competition. It boasts a Manners composite stock and 20.5 or 24-inch heavy barrel. The 0.866″-diameter tube is threaded and suppressor-ready. The model 455 VPT is mag-fed and comes with a crisp trigger that adjusts to two pounds. Street price is around $830. That’s pricey for a rimfire — but you’re getting a premium Manners stock that would cost $534 by itself.

Field Testing the CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer

.22 LR Rimfire from 50 to 300 Yards
CZ  455 rimfire precision PRS trainer .22 LR smallbore video TFBTV manners stockThe CZ 455 VPT proved accurate, recording half-inch groups at 50 yards with SK ammo: “[we] shot CCI standard, Federal match, and SK match through the rifle. It liked the SK ammo the best.” One goal of this test was to see how a .22 LR could perform beyond typical rimfire ranges, so reviewer Joel Wise (Precision Rifle Network) tested this rifle all the way out to 300 yards. Groups were about 1″ at 100 yards, but opened up considerably at 200 and 300. Joel concluded 300 yards was a practical max. We know that some tactical rimfire matches set targets out that far, but we think 200 yards might be a better practical limit for matches run with smallbore rifles. It’s not just the problem of running out of elevation in your scope. At 300 yards the effect of the wind is huge.

CZ  455 rimfire precision PRS trainer .22 LR smallbore video TFBTV manners stock

The CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer (VPT) features a mag-fed CZ 455 action, with .866″-diameter heavy barrel, in a rigid, high-tech Manners Composite stock. Feeding was very reliable.

CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer

The 455 VPT offers the same look and feel of a full-size tactical rifle. This 455 uses a Manners MCS-T4 stock assuring a rock solid platform for the 455 barreled action. The outer shell of the MCS-T4 is made with carbon fiber and fiber glass in multiple layers. The stocks can be custom-ordered with a heavy fill to match your current rifle weight to truly duplicate its feel.

Manners VPT Stock Available for Other Rimfire Platforms
Manners Composite Stocks offers versions of the CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer stock design that can be used with other barreled actions: “The 455 VPT stock is based on our MCS-T4 design. We offer this, fully inletted with pillars, for a variety of rimfire actions: Sako Quad, Savage Mark II, CZ 452, CZ 453, along with the 455.”

CZ 455 Varmint Precision Trainer

Inletting is complete, so this will be a drop-in solution if you already own one of the listed rimfire rifles. Tom Manners notes: “With this stock, some guys will bed the rear area of their action, but that’s not necessary — you can pretty much bolt ‘em in and go”.

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Tactical 1 Comment »
November 13th, 2018

Gun Laws By State — FREE Detailed Guides to State Regulations

Gun Laws by State PewPewtactical.com Pew Pew Byran Ciyou attorney book

Gun Laws by State PewPewtactical.com Pew Pew Byran Ciyou attorney bookWill you be traveling to other states this winter? Are you concerned about the laws that might apply when you are transporting firearms across state lines? Or are you puzzled about the requirements for obtaining a carry permit in your own state? If you have any of these (and related questions) you should definitely get some expert guidance on State statutes and regulations controlling firearms. To do that, you can purchase Attorney Bryan Ciyou’s comprehensive Gun Laws by State reference book. This is worth the money, and the $20 cost also includes access to an online legal database and other services.

If you don’t want to spend the twenty bucks, there is a good FREE alternative. There’s a very helpful set of State Law Summaries on the web, presented by PewPewTactical.com. Despite the silly name, the PewPewTactical website has an abundance of information that is particularly beneficial for pistol shooters and CCW holders.

One of the best features of PewPewTactical.com is the Gun Laws by State online reference guide. We looked through four of these State Law Summaries (including our home state California) and were impressed by the depth of the coverage. But we caution — if you have specific legal questions, particularly with recently enacted statutes, you will want to consult a licensed attorney for your state (or the state to which you will travel). Below are links to state law articles from PewPewTactical.com. To access any State summary, simply click the State name below:

Gun Laws by State — FREE Law Summaries

CLICK state name to access each article.

Alabama Gun Laws

Alaska Gun Laws

Arizona Gun Laws

Arkansas Gun Laws

California Gun Laws

Colorado Gun Laws

Connecticut Gun Laws

Delaware Gun Laws

Florida Gun Laws

Georgia Gun Laws

Hawaii Gun Laws

Idaho Gun Laws

Illinois Gun Laws

Indiana Gun Laws

Iowa Gun Laws

Kansas Gun Laws

Kentucky Gun Laws

Louisiana Gun Laws

Maine Gun Laws

Maryland Gun Laws

Massachusetts Gun Laws

Michigan Gun Laws

Minnesota Gun Laws

Mississippi Gun Laws

Missouri Gun Laws

Montana Gun Laws

Nebraska Gun Laws

Nevada Gun Laws

New Hampshire Gun Laws

New Jersey Gun Laws

New Mexico Gun Laws

New York Gun Laws

North Carolina Gun Laws

North Dakota Gun Laws

Ohio Gun Laws

Oklahoma Gun Laws

Oregon Gun Laws

Pennsylvania Gun Laws

Rhode Island Gun Laws

South Carolina Gun Laws

South Dakota Gun Laws

Tennessee Gun Laws

Texas Gun Laws

Utah Gun Laws

Vermont Gun Laws

Virginia Gun Laws

Washington Gun Laws

West Virginia Gun Laws

Wisconsin Gun Laws

Wyoming Gun Laws

Washington, D.C. Gun Laws

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November 12th, 2018

Bargain Finder 164: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, optics, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Kentucky Gun Co. — T/C Compass Rifle $209.99 After Rebate

Kentucky Gun Thompson Center T/C rifle discount rebate

How would you like to get a proper hunting rifle for $209.99? That’s not a misprint. Right now Kentucky Gun Company is selling Thompson Center (T/C) Compass rifles for $259.99 in seven popular chamberings: .204 Ruger, .223 Remington, .22-250, 6.5 Creedmoor, 7mm-08, .308 Winchester, and .30-06 Springfield. But it gets even better — these rifles qualify for a $50.00 T/C factory rebate. That lowers your net cost for the T/C Compass to $209.99 — less than you might pay for a barrel alone. This rifle is perfectly capable of harvesting game, and carries a strong factory warranty backed by Smith & Wesson. Put the dollars you save into optics and ammo.

2. Bruno’s — Norma 6mm Dasher Brass (Gen 2) $114.95/100

Norma 6mm Dasher brass cartridge cases Bruno Shooters supply Bruno's

The 6mm Dasher was originally a wildcat cartridge. To make Dasher brass you had to fire-form (or hydro-form) 6mmBR brass. That all changed a couple years ago when Shiraz Balolia (of Grizzly.com) signed a deal with Norma to produce rifle-ready 6mm Dasher brass. Norma’s Dasher brass features a longer neck offering more seating flexibility (and slightly more capacity). The latest Dasher brass is very good — capable of winning benchrest matches. If you have an older Dasher chamber, just trim the necks. Thanks to Lester Bruno, Norma Dasher brass is now available again. This is premium GEN 2 Dasher brass with the standard rim thickness. We believe Bruno’s is now the exclusive supplier of Norma Dasher brass. The brass is in the USA and will ship soon. Get this Norma-made 6mm Dasher Brass while you can. Price is $114.95 per 100 pieces. Factor in the savings (in bullets, powder, and time) by avoiding fire-forming, and you see why this brass is very popular.

3. TCK LLC — LabRadar Chronograph $60 Off Nov. 15 – Dec. 9

LabRadar Radar Doppler chronograph summer sale $50 off chrono lab-radar Bruno shooters Creedmoor

If you’ve been wanting to get a LabRadar Chronograph, here’s your chance. Starting Thursday 11/15/2018, you can save $60 on this very advanced piece of technology — probably the most sophisticated chronograph system ever offered to the general public. That’s notable because you almost never see this discounted below the $559.95 MAP price. Get the LabRadar for $499.95 with this Special Sale which starts on November 15 and extends through December 9, 2018. NOTE: you may be able to get the same deal from other vendors such as Creedmoor Sports, Bruno Shooters Supply, and Midsouth Shooters Supply, but you need to check. Right now we can only confirm the deal through TCK LLC on BuyMyLabradar.com. Check with other vendors on 11/15/18.

4. 21st Century Shooting — 10% Off with Code FALLNOV10

21st Century Shooting Fall november 10% off discount code

21st Century Shooting offers some of the best precision loading tools on the market. Our editors own and use many 21st Century products, including neck-turning lathe, concentricity gauge, hydro bullet seater (arbor press), and priming tool. You’ll also see these tools in the reloading rooms of National and World Champion shooters. Now you can get this world-class 21st Century gear at a significant discount. Through the end of November, save 10% off many 21st Century products with CODE FALLNOV10. Use that code at check-out. When you’ve filled out your order, type the code in the Coupon Field, then click the button labeled “Redeem Coupon”. That will confirm “10% off all online orders”.

5. Field Supply — Nikon Refurbished Scopes up to 65% Off

Nikon refurbished scopes deal Field Supply

You won’t find a better deal on Nikons anywhere. These are Nikon-certified, factory-refurbished scopes. This is a good choice if you’re looking for big-name quality at rock-bottom prices. Good option for a hunting or varmint rifle. The savings on Nikon optics are up to 65% off retail. NOTE: all these Nikon refurbs have been refurbished to Nikon Factory specifications by Nikon, Inc. and are covered by a 90-day limited warranty. Sale refurb optics start at under $80.00.

6. MidwayUSA — Lyman 8-Station Turret Press, $159.99

lyman brass smith MidwayUSA 8-station all american turret press reloading

Right now you can get Lyman’s new All-American 8-station turret press for just $159.99. That’s a great price. This high-capacity turret press sells elsewhere for up to $229.99. The Lyman offers more die stations than the 6-station RCBS Turret and the 7-station Redding T-7. It also has a strong rear support that minimizes head flex. NOTE: Priming on the Lyman turret is done in the front; the image above shows the priming station but not the vertical tube which holds stacked primers.

7. RCBS — Save 25% on Select Dispenser/Scales, Progressive Presses, Prep Centers, and Ultrasonic Machines

RCBS 25% off sale November discount savings

RCBS wants you to “buy green” in November. Now through November 30, 2018 you can get 25% Instant Savings on a variety of RCBS’s most popular products, including the ChargeMaster Lite, ProChucker Progressive Presses, and both the Trim Mate and Universal Case Prep Centers. Ultrasonic cleaning machines are also discounted. This is easy-peasy — no forms to fill out and no waiting on rebates. Just shop at your favorite retailer, and you’ll find qualifying products 25% cheaper than last month.

Credit EdLongrange for finding this deal.

8. Midsouth — Tipton 13-Piece Jag set, $11.99

Midsouth Shooters supply tipton 17 6mm 22 .308 9mm 338 6.5mm .45 caliber jag kit

Here’s a great, budget-priced Jag Kit ideal for someone who shots many different calibers. This kit will cover just about any rifle or pistol bore size. Get 13 jags in a handy, clear-top fitted caddy for just $11.99. The kit covers everything from 17 caliber up to .45 caliber, with 17, 20, 22, 243/6mm, 25/6.5mm, 270/7mm, 30/32, 338/8mm, 35/9mm, 375, 40, 44, and 45 jags. The storage box features marked cavities for each caliber. The small .17 cal and .20 cal jags have a 5-40 threads, while all the remaining 11 larger jags have the standard 8-32 thread size.

9. GunBuyer — Mossberg 12ga Tactical Shotgun, $299.00

Mossberg model 500 20

A strong argument can be made that the best home defense firearm is a 12 gauge shotgun. This Mossberg 500 is a reliable 12ga pump-gun with useful upgrades including ghost-ring sights and barrel heat-shield. This Model 500 Tactical boasts an 8-shell capacity and weighs 7 pounds unloaded. Order now from GunBuyer.com for $299.00. Owners love this serious-looking shotgun: “This unit… fires smooth, and operates perfectly out of the box. There’s an odd beauty to the tactical pump that is hard to describe. The action is smooth and repeatable.”

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November 12th, 2018

Optics Expertise: MIL and MOA Terminology Defined

Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series
Visit PrecisionRifleBlog.com for a discussion of MIL vs. MOA.

Many guys getting started in long range shooting are confused about what kind of scope they should buy — specifically whether it should have MIL-based clicks or MOA-based clicks. Before you can make that decision, you need to understand the terminology. This article, with a video by Bryan Litz, explains MILS and MOA so you can choose the right type of scope for your intended application.

This March-FX 5-40x56mm Tactical FFP scope features 0.05 MIL Clicks.
Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series

You probably know that MOA stands for “Minute of Angle” (or more precisely “minute of arc”), but could you define the terms “Milrad” or “MIL”? In his latest video, Bryan Litz of Applied Ballitics explains MOA and MILs (short for “milliradians”). Bryan defines those terms and explains how they are used. One MOA is an angular measurement (1/60th of one degree) that subtends 1.047″ at 100 yards. One MIL (i.e. one milliradian) subtends 1/10th meter at 100 meters; that means that 0.1 Mil is one centimeter (1 cm) at 100 meters. Is one angular measurement system better than another? Not necessarily… Bryan explains that Mildot scopes may be handy for ranging, but scopes with MOA-based clicks work just fine for precision work at known distances. Also because one MOA is almost exactly one inch at 100 yards, the MOA system is convenient for expressing a rifle’s accuracy. By common parlance, a “half-MOA” rifle can shoot groups that are 1/2-inch (or smaller) at 100 yards.

What is a “Minute” of Angle?
When talking about angular degrees, a “minute” is simply 1/60th. So a “Minute of Angle” is simply 1/60th of one degree of a central angle, measured either up and down (for elevation) or side to side (for windage). At 100 yards, 1 MOA equals 1.047″ on the target. This is often rounded to one inch for simplicity. Say, for example, you click up 1 MOA (four clicks on a 1/4-MOA scope). That is roughly 1 inch at 100 yards, or roughly 4 inches at 400 yards, since the target area measured by an MOA subtension increases with the distance.

one MOA minute of angle diagram

MIL vs. MOA for Target Ranging
MIL or MOA — which angular measuring system is better for target ranging (and hold-offs)? In a recent article on his PrecisionRifleBlog.com website, Cal Zant tackles that question. Analyzing the pros and cons of each, Zant concludes that both systems work well, provided you have compatible click values on your scope. Zant does note that a 1/4 MOA division is “slightly more precise” than 1/10th mil, but that’s really not a big deal: “Technically, 1/4 MOA clicks provide a little finer adjustments than 1/10 MIL. This difference is very slight… it only equates to 0.1″ difference in adjustments at 100 yards or 1″ at 1,000 yards[.]” Zant adds that, in practical terms, both 1/4-MOA clicks and 1/10th-MIL clicks work well in the field: “Most shooters agree that 1/4 MOA or 1/10 MIL are both right around that sweet spot.”

READ MIL vs. MOA Cal Zant Article.

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November 12th, 2018

Wind Wizardry — How to Use a Kestrel Correctly

Kestrel Wind Meter Direction Vane Applied Ballistics

A lot of folks use a Kestrel Wind Meter every time at the range. That’s a good thing. However, many Kestrel owners may not be employing the Kestrel properly when seeking wind direction.

A Kestrel Wind Meter will record wind speed with its impeller wheel. However, to get the most accurate wind velocity reading, you need to have your Kestrel properly aligned with the wind direction. To find wind direction, first orient the Kestrel so that the impeller runs at minimal speed (or stops), and only then turn the BACK of the Kestrel into the wind direction. Do NOT simply rotate the Kestrel’s back panel looking for the highest wind speed reading — that’s not the correct method for finding wind direction. Rotate the side of the Kestrel into the wind first, aiming for minimal impeller movement. The correct procedure is explained below by the experts at Applied Ballistics.

How to Find the Wind Direction with a Kestrel Wind Meter

Here is the correct way to determine wind direction with a Kestrel wind meter when you have no environmental aids — no other tools than a Kestrel. (NOTE: To determine wind direction, a mounted Wind Vane is the most effective tool, but you can also look at flags, blowing grass, or even the lanyard on your Kestrel).

Step 1: Find the wind’s general direction.

Step 2: Rotate the Wind Meter 90 degrees, so that the wind is impacting the side (and not the back) of the wind meter, while still being able to see the impeller.

Step 3: Fine-tune the direction until the impeller drastically slows, or comes to a complete stop (a complete stop is preferred). If the impeller won’t come to a complete stop, find the direction which has the lowest impact on the impeller.

Step 4: Turn the BACK of the Kestrel towards the direction from which the wind is blowing. Then press the capture button, and record your wind speed.

Do NOT simply point the Kestrel’s back into the wind until you get the highest wind speed — that’s not the correct method.

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