July 27th, 2016

DJ’s Brass Can Anneal, Turn Necks, Hydro-Form Cases and More

DJ's Brass Restoration Service

Bench Source Annealing machineWith the price of premium brass topping $1.00 per case for popular match cartridges, it makes sense to consider annealing your brass to extend its useful life. You don’t want to chuck out brass that costs a buck a case (or more)! Forum member Darrell Jones offers a full range of brass prep, brass forming, and brass restoration (annealing, ultra-sonic cleaning) at very affordable prices. Starting at just $20 per 100 cases ($25/100 for magnum cases), Darrell’s company, DJ’s Brass, will anneal your used brass using state-of-the-art Bench-Source annealing machines. Annealing plus ultrasonic cleaning starts at $35 per 100 cases ($45 for magnum cases). For a bit more money Darrell can also uniform the primer pockets and chamfer the case necks.

Custom Neck-Turning Services
Another great service DJ’s Brass provides is precision neck-turning. Darrell can neck-turn any size case to your specified neck-wall thickness. The price starts at $60.00 per hundred for standard cases or $75.00/100 for magnum size with a $25.00 minimum order. And if you’ve got a bucket of brass to neck-turn, that’s fine with Darrell — he recently neck-turned 1500 pieces of brass for one customer!

DJ’s Brass can process everything from .17 Fireball all the way up to the big magnum cases. And the job gets done quickly. Darrell normally offers a 10-day turn-around. For most jobs, Darrell tells us, he gets the processed brass to the Post Office within three business days. For more info, visit DJsBrass.com or call Darrell Jones at 205-461-4680. IMPORTANT: Contact Darrell for shipping instructions BEFORE sending any brass for processing. ALL BRASS MUST BE DE-PRIMED before you send it.

DJ's Brass Restoration Service

• Anneal Case Necks Only ($20.00/100 normal or $25.00/100 magnum)
• Ultrasonic Cleaning, Check Necks, and Annealing ($35.00/100 normal or $45.00/100 magnum)
• Full Service: Uniform primer pockets, Chamfer case mouths, Ultrasonic cleaning and Polishing, Anneal case necks (Starting at $50.00/100 call for quote)
• Neck Turning or trim-to-length Custom Order Service (Starting at $60.00/100 for standard cases and $75.00/100 for magnums)
• Hydro-Form Specialty cases (such as Dasher) $0.60 (sixty cents) each minimum of 100 pieces plus actual return shipping cost
• Expand Case Necks and Anneal brass (Call for Price)
• Create False Shoulder for Fire-Forming (Call for Price)
• Ultrasonic Cleaning of Muzzle Brake, $5.00 plus actual shipping

Hydro-Forming Cartridge Brass
Hydro-forming by Darrell costs $0.60 per case with a minimum order of 100 pieces. After hydro-forming, Darrell can also neck-turn the case for an additional charge (call for combined quote).

hydroforming hydro-form Dasher 6mmBR PPC Darrell Jones

With Darrell’s hydro-forming service you don’t have to buy any special dies or other equipment. Darrell says: “Simply send me the brass you need or have it dropped-shipped to me along with a fired case that has not been sized. If you need formed brass for a new build (gun not yet fired), let me know and I will size the brass to fit within .001″ of a PT&G GO gauge.”

DJ’s Brass Offers Specialized Custom Services
Darrell tells us: “At DJ’s Brass, we can handle all your brass refurbishing needs. From ultrasonic cleaning to custom annealing for specific wildcat cartridges. We can expand your necks from .22 caliber to .30 caliber and anneal shoulders for consistent bump-back. We can turn your case-necks and trim the brass to your specs. For some cartridge types, I can pre-form cases to assist in fire-forming a wildcat cartridge. We also remove the carbon build-up in muzzle brakes. Don’t lose your accuracy by having carbon build up and close off the clearance required for the most accurate bullet release through a muzzle brake.” Note: Extra charges apply for neck-turning and neck expansion operations, or specialized cartridge-forming operations. Please call Darrell at 205-461-4680 for special services pricing.

DJ's Brass Restoration Service

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading Post comment »
July 27th, 2016

Smith & Wesson Acquires Crimson Trace for $95 Million

Crimson Trace CTC Smith & Wesson Holding Company S&W acquisition Oregon Wilsonville

Here’s big news in the gun industry. In a $95 million cash deal, Smith & Wesson Holding Company (Nasdaq: SWHC) will acquire Crimson Trace Corporation (CTC), the industry leader in firearms laser sights and tactical lighting. Once the acquisition is finalized, CTC will operate as Smith & Wesson’s new Electro-Optics Division, headed by Lane Tobiassen, CTC’s current President and CEO. Jeffrey Buchanan, Executive VP and CFO of Smith & Wesson, stated, “We intend to complete the purchase of Crimson Trace with cash on hand and we expect the transaction to close in three to six weeks.”

Lane Tobiassen Crimson Trace CTC Smith & Wesson Holding Company S&W acquisition Oregon WilsonvilleThis deal makes sense for both parties. In the past 12 months, CTC earned $44 million, with a quarter of that coming from Smith & Wesson. CTC President/CEO Lane Tobiassen will serve as President of S&W’s new Electro-Optics Division. The Crimson Trace management team and workforce, as well as its base of operations, will remain in Wilsonville, Oregon after the acquisition. Smith & Wesson Holding Corporation (SWHC) will purchase all of the outstanding stock of Crimson Trace for $95.0 million in cash.

Two Decades of Innovation and Growth for CTC
Founded 22 years ago, Crimson Trace is now the firearms industry leader in laser sighting system and tactical lighting. CTC currently offers more than 225 products, including: Lasergrips®, Laserguard®, Rail Master® platforms, Defender Series®, Lightguard®, and the new LiNQ™ wireless activation system. With its ever-expanding product line, CTC has generated a 10-year compound annual revenue growth rate in excess of 10%.

Crimson Trace CTC Smith & Wesson Holding Company S&W acquisition Oregon Wilsonville
CTC offers cutting-edge technology, including LiNQ™, the world’s first wirelessly-controlled laser + white light system. LiNQ™ combines a green laser sight and 300-Lumen LED white light for AR-Type Modern Sporting Rifles. The laser and light are controlled wirelessly via handgrip buttons.

Top Crimson Trace and S&W Executives Speak Out:
CTC President/CEO Lane Tobiassen said: “It is a great honor to lead Crimson Trace into this exciting new chapter in our history by joining the Smith & Wesson team. Since 1994, we have designed and brought to market more than 225 products[.] As the new Electro-Optics Division of Smith & Wesson, we believe that our capabilities, combined with inorganic opportunities to acquire related technologies, will expand the reach of our existing market footprint. This makes us a great fit for Smith & Wesson, a legendary company with an iconic brand[.]”

James Debney, Smith & Wesson President and CEO said, “Crimson Trace provides us with an exceptional opportunity to acquire a thriving company that is completely aligned with our strategy to become a leader in the market for shooting, hunting, and rugged outdoor enthusiasts. As the undisputed leader in the market for laser sighting products, Crimson Trace serves as an ideal platform for our new Electro-Optics Division.”

Permalink News, Optics Post comment »
July 27th, 2016

Ruger Gives $4 Million to NRA-ILA and Pledges $1 Million More

Ruger NRA-ILA donation 2 million gun

Ruger has donated $4,000,000.00 to the NRA-ILA (Institute for Legislative Action), based on Ruger’s pledge to donate $2.00 for every new Ruger firearm sold between the 2015 and 2016 NRA Annual Meetings. Ruger called this the “2 Million Gun Challenge”.

Ruger met the challenge goal of selling two million new firearms, thereby generating a total donation of $4,000,000. Ruger CEO Mike Fifer and President Chris Killoy presented Chris Cox, NRA-ILA’s Executive Director, with a check for $4,000,000 at the 2016 NRA Annual Meetings in Louisville, Kentucky. Cox praised Ruger’s Challenge Program: “The funds raised from this program will help us in both our fight to protect America’s Second Amendment and our effort to educate voters and get them to the polls this crucial election year.”

During the challenge period, one of the largest distributors of Ruger firearms, Davidson’s / Gallery of Guns, also pledged to donate $1.00 for each new Ruger firearm sold through its distributorship. Davidson’s effort added more than $350,000 to the NRA-ILA cause.

Ruger 2 Million Gun Challenge Becomes 2.5 Million Gun Challenge

Ruger NRA-ILA donation 2 million gun

Both Ruger and Davidson’s have pledged to extend the challenge period through the end of October, to ensure continued support up until the election. Ruger hopes to sell another 500,000 new firearms (by the end of October 2016) with a $2.00 donation per gun. If Ruger meets its challenge, that would generate another $1 million in NRA-ILA donations, for a total of $5,000,000 for the 2015-2016 period.

For more information on the Ruger 2.5 Million Gun Challenge, visit Ruger.com/2Million.

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July 26th, 2016

Optics-Equipped Service Rifles Dominate President’s 100 Match

President's 100 match

President's 100 match March Optics 1-4.5x24mm Service Rifle

When the NRA and CMP issued new rules allowing the use of 4.5X optics for Service Rifles, some asked: “will scopes really make a difference?”. The answer is a resounding “Yes”, based on match results just in from Camp Perry. In the prestigious National President’s 100 Match fired July 25th, the first-, second-, and third-place finishers all had scopes. Keith Stephens won the match, SFC Evan Hess took second, and Hugh Reich finished third — an all-optics Podium. Both winner Keith Stephens and third-place Hugh Reich were running March 1-4.5x24mm scopes on their rifles. And there were many other optics users among the Top 20 competitors in the President’s 100 Finals. (The President’s 100 Match concludes with a single 10-round shoot-off at 600 yards, fired by the best 20 shooters from the prelims.)

March Service Rifle Optic scope 1-4.5x

The March 1-4.5x24mm scope was designed expressly for Service Rifle competition and tactical applications (it will focus down to 10 yards). This first-focal-plane optic features 1/4″ MOA clicks and optimal eye relief for AR-type rifles. March’s optics experts tell us: “This scope was specifically designed for the Service Rifle match shooter. Oversized tactical turrets allow for easy windage and elevation adjustments. High-quality ED (low distortion) lenses provide superior image resolution”. Current retail price for this scope is $2338.00 from Bullets.com.

That is a significant investment to be sure. But if you asked President’s 100 Match Winner Keith Stephens, he’d probably tell you his March 1-4.5x24mm scope was worth every penny…

Permalink Competition, Optics 8 Comments »
July 26th, 2016

Women and Firearms — Growing Numbers of Female Shooters

Women NRA Gun Firearms statistics infographic 2016

Did you know that American women are the fastest-growing segment of gun owners? Whether it’s for self-protection, hunting, or target shooting, women are showing more interest than ever in owning firearms. Moreover, women are taking steps to train and educate themselves, and to get involved in hunting, recreational shooting, and firearms competition. This is now a significant trend — women are becoming an important and vital part of the shooting community. Nearly one-quarter (23%) of American women now own at least one firearm.

The numbers of women participating in the shooting sports has grown dramatically in recent years. in fact, in the decade from 2001 to 2010, the number of female target shooters has risen 43.5%:

Women NRA Gun Firearms statistics infographic 2016

Women and Firearms Infographic (CLICK HERE):

Women NRA Gun Firearms statistics infographic 2016

Story and images courtesy NRABlog.com.

Permalink News, Shooting Skills Post comment »
July 26th, 2016

Handy Magnifiers Help Old Eyes with Reloading Tasks

Magnifying lens LED light relaoding

pocket fold-out magnifierWhat is the most-used piece of equipment on this editor’s reloading bench? No it’s not my Rock-Chucker press, or even my calipers. The one item in near-constant use is a small, folding magnifying glass. Mine folds into a square case and offers 4X viewing with an 8X bifocal insert. With this handy tool I can inspect case mouths for burrs, check primer pockets, inspect meplats, and look for flaws on bullet jackets. I also use the magnifier to see rifling marks on bullets seated into the rifling, or check my bolt for galling. The number of uses is nearly endless. I keep one magnifier at my reloading bench and another in my range kit.

Folding magnifiers are so handy yet inexpensive that you should own a couple spares (including one in the range box). I bought my magnifier in a book-store, but you can also find them on the web at FoldingMagnifier.com and WidgetSupply.com starting at just $1.95. To see the finest details, Widget Supply offers a powerful 9X/18X slide-out magnifier with a built-in, battery-powered LED light. With that gadget, you can easily see any minute flaws in your barrel crowns. That’s important because crown damage can cause hard-to-diagnose accuracy issues. We’ve known guys who spend weeks tinkering with loads, when the real problem was a worn-out or damaged crown.

Permalink Gear Review, Reloading Post comment »
July 25th, 2016

Bargain Finder 45: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

1. Amazon — Caldwell Long Range Target Camera System, $367.70

Amazon Caldwell Precision Long Range Target System Cam Camera

Forum members have purchased this Caldwell Target Cam System and they’ve found that it works reliably, providing a clear signal to any WiFi-enabled mobile device (smartphone, iPad, Laptop). One member specifically tested the unit at 1000 yards and it functioned fine. NOTE: This system does NOT have a zoom camera lens, so you need to position the camera within 10 yards or so of the target. But if you place it to the side a bit, this shouldn’t be a problem. This system comes with a nice, fitted carrying case that holds camera, transceivers, antennas, and stands. You get a very capable system for under $370.00 (Amazon price includes free shipping for Prime members). You can also get this system from Midsouth for $357.02 (shipping extra).

This video shows system set-up and actual Target Cam output on a WiFi-enabled tablet:

2. Grafs.com — $99.99 Electronic Earbud Headset 31dB NRR

Walker Razor-X Headset Earbuds Electronic

This is a totally new kind of hearing protection. Walker’s Razor-X and Razor-XV operate like electronic muffs — allowing you to hear commands and conversations while still blocking gunshots and other loud noises. The Razor-X combines a collar unit (containing the electronics) with retractable, foam-tipped ear buds. Unlike conventional earmuffs, the Razor-X system doesn’t interfere with your cheek weld. The patent-pending earbuds allow the user to be in loud environments without damaging their hearing, providing an impressive 31dB of noise reduction.

Walker Razor-X Headset Earbuds Electronic

The kit includes two different styles of noise-reducing foam tips (in various sizes) to ensure a good fit for maximum noise reduction. The Razor-X is equipped with an auto-shut off after 4 to 6 hours. An AC wall adapter with USB port and a one-meter micro USB cord is provided.

TECH NOTE: Grafs.com shows a 29dB NRR in the product title. However, the manufacturer (and all other retailers) list a 31dB Noise Reduction Rating for the Razor-X and Razor-XV.

3. EuroOptic — Leupold 12-40×60 Spotter + Red Dot + SLICK Rail

Leupold Spotting Scope MK4 Slick Rail Delta-Point

Here’s a super deal on a premium Tactical spotter package. Right now you can get a Leupold MK4 TMR 12-40x60mm spotting scope, PLUS a Delta-Point Pro 2.5 MOA Red-dot (for quick aiming), PLUS a Badger SLICK mount for under $1500.00. The Leupold MK4 12-40 spotter sells for $1399.00 by itself elsewhere. So this is like getting the Delta-Point and SLICK mount for $100.00 (or free — read about $1400 special below). CLICK HERE for Package Deal.

The unique SLICK mount is definitely worth having. This lets you add a laser rangefinder or other accessory and have the LRF aligned (collimated) perfectly with your spotting scope.

Jason tells us: “This is the best value I have seen on gear in a long time. On top of that, we are offering AccurateShooter.com readers a FURTHER discount to $1400 shipped for pre-ordering (pre-payment required)”. NOTE: to get the Special $1400.00 Pre-Order price, call EuroOptic at (570) 368-3920 and ask for Jason Baney.

4. Sportsmans Outdoor — Ruger American Predator, $359.99

AccurateShooter Deal Week Sale Rugers American Predator 6.5 Creemoor Tactical

Here’s a nice little 6.5 Creedmoor rifle from Ruger with good features at a very attractive price, just $359.99. This Predator model features a heavier-contour 22″, 1:8″-twist barrel threaded 5/8″-24 at the muzzle for brake or suppressor. The action, which features a 70° three-lug bolt, and Picatinny-style scope rail, sits in an aluminum bedding block. The trigger is crisp and adjusts down to 3 pounds. The 6.5 Creedmoor chambering is well-suited for both hunting and tactical/practical games. The rifle weighs 6.5 pounds without optic. For real tactical work you’ll want to replace the stock — but with only $360 into the gun you can easily afford a better stock/chassis.

5. MidwayUSA — Magpul 700 Black Stock, $219.99 on Sale

AccurateShooter Deal Week Sale Magpul Rem 700 Hunter Stock bedding block

The new Magpul Remington 700 Hunter Stock offers an aluminum bedding block, plus adjustable length of pull and comb height. Compatible with all Remington 700 Short Actions, this stock requires no bedding and is a true “drop-in” solution. Also available (separately) is Magpul’s Bolt Action Magazine Well, which allows the rifle to be used with detachable box magazines without the need for custom inletting. NOTE: to see the $219.99 Sale price, you must select the black version in your Midway USA Shopping Cart. This price includes stock only; magazine and and bottom metal are NOT included.

Free Floating: Free-floats Remington barrels including aftermarket profiles up to a Medium Palma
Bottom Metal: Compatible with all stock Remington bottom metal
Weight: 2.9 lbs without action and bottom metal

6. Natchez Shooters Supply — 325 Rounds .22 LR Ammo, $22.99

AccurateShooter Deal Week Sale Bargain .22 LR Federal Bulk Ammo

This Federal .22 LR ammo is just 7 cents per round — the kind of pricing on bulk rimfire ammo we used to see in the “good old days”. Act quickly, this Federal .22 LR Ammo deal won’t last long. Also, note that seller Natchez has a 2-piece maximum order per day.” So you may order two boxes per day, which will total 650 rounds. The bullets are 40 grains, solid lead.

7. Cabela’s — Lyman TurboSonic Cleaning Machine, $49.99

Lyman Turbosonic Cleaning Machine Week Deal Bargain

If you have brass or small parts to clean an ultrasonic cleaning machine really comes in handy. This Lyman machine was a good deal at $69.99 before. Now it is an awesome deal at $49.99 from Cabela’s. Plus you may even be able to get it for less. One buyer said you can get this item for $44.99 including shipping if you use code “16CAVE” at check-out. Worth a try.

8. Natchez — Hornady 22-Cal Varmint Bullets, $9.99 Per 100

AccurateShooter Deals of the Week Hornady VArmint .223 .224 bullets 55 grain

Headed out for a varmint safari soon? Need inexpensive bullets for your .223 Rem or 22-250? Then check out this deal on Hornady 55-grainers from Natchez. Get 100 Soft Point .224-Caliber FB bullets for just $9.99. At that price, it doesn’t hurt so much when you shoot 1000+ rounds over a weekend. With good expansion, these bullets work great on prairie dogs and other small critters. Note: These sale bullets ship in a bag, not the box as shown.

Permalink Gear Review, Hot Deals, Optics Post comment »
July 25th, 2016

National President’s 100 Rifle Match at Camp Perry


Troy Lawton won the President’s 100 Rifle Match in 2013.

Our friend Dennis Santiago is at Camp Perry, where today (25 July) he is shooting the National President’s 100 Rifle Match — a competition steeped in history. First fired in 1878, this match was incorporated into the National Match program in 1903. The President’s Match was modeled after the famous British Queen’s Prize Match. Originally, the Match winner received a letter of congratulations from the President of the United States.

National President's 100 Match Camp Perry 2016 Dennis Santiago

In the President’s Rifle Match, all competitors fire 10 shots standing, 10 shots rapid prone, and 10 shots prone slow fire to determine who makes the President’s 100 list. The top 20 shooters then advance to a final where they fire a 10-shot stage at 600 yards. This 20-marksman Finals Shoot-off now concludes the President’s Rifle Match.

CLICK HERE for Results of President’s Match and Other National Trophy Matches.

Origins of the President’s Match
The President’s Match originated in 1878 as the American Military Rifle Championship Match. In 1884, the name was changed to the President’s Match for the Military Rifle Championship of the United States. It was fired at Creedmoor, New York until 1891. In 1895, it was reintroduced at Sea Girt, New Jersey. Today, the match is held at Camp Perry, Ohio.

Dunfey USAMU President's MatchThe President’s Match was patterned after an event for British Volunteers called the Queen’s Match. That British competition was started in 1860 by Queen Victoria and the NRA of Great Britain to increase the ability of Britain’s marksmen following the Crimean War.

The tradition of making a letter from the President of the United States the first prize began in 1904 when President Theodore Roosevelt personally wrote a letter of congratulations to the winner, Private Howard Gensch of the New Jersey National Guard.

After a hiatus in the 1930s and 1940s, The President’s Match was reinstated in 1957 at the National Matches as “The President’s Hundred”. The 100 top-scoring competitors in the President’s Match are singled out for special recognition.

CLICK HERE for history of the President’s Match.

Videos from Camp Perry 2016

Relay Four of the President’s 100 Rifle Match. Shooting offhand, 150 guns at a time.
Rain, thunder, lightning, storm cells. “Load and be ready!” — Not.
Permalink - Videos, Competition Post comment »
July 25th, 2016

Power User Tips for Ultrasonic Cleaning Machines

Ultrasonic Cleaning RCBS Ultrasound .308 Winchester 7.62x51 brass casings

Tumblers and walnut/corncob media are old school. These days many shooters prefer processing brass rapidly with an ultrasonic cleaning machine. When used with the proper solution, a good ultrasonic cleaning machine can quickly remove remove dust, carbon, oil, and powder residue from your cartridge brass. The ultrasonic process will clean the inside of the cases, and even the primer pockets. Tumbling works well too, but for really dirty brass, ultrasonic cleaning may be a wise choice.

READ FULL UltimateReloader.com Article on Ultrasonic Case Cleaning.

Our friend Gavin Gear recently put an RCBS Ultrasonic cleaning machine through its paces using RCBS Ultrasonic Case Cleaning Solution (RCBS #87058). To provide a real challenge, Gavin used some very dull and greasy milsurp brass: “I bought a huge lot of military once-fired 7.52x51mm brass (fired in a machine gun) that I’ve been slowly prepping for my DPMS LR-308B AR-10 style rifle. Some of this brass was fully prepped (sized/de-primed, trimmed, case mouths chamfered, primer pockets reamed) but it was gunked up with lube and looking dingy.”

UltimateReloader.com Case Cleaning Video (7.5 minutes):

Gavin describes the cleaning exercise step-by-step on UltimateReloader.com. Read Gavin’s Cartridge Cleaning Article to learn how he mixed the solution, activated the heater, and cycled the machine for 30 minutes. As you can see in the video above, the results were impressive. If you have never cleaned brass with ultrasound before, you should definitely watch Gavin’s 7.5-minute video — it provides many useful tips and shows the cleaning operation in progress from start to finish.


The RCBS ultrasonic cleaning machine features a large 3-liter capacity, 60 watt transducer, and 100 watt ceramic heater. The RCBS ultrasonic machine can be found under $140.00, and this unit qualifies for RCBS Rebates ($10 off $50 purchase or $75 off combined $300.00 purchase). RCBS also sells 32 oz. bottles of cleaning concentrate that will make up to 10 gallons of Ultrasonic Solution.

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading Post comment »
July 24th, 2016

Phillips Video Shows Highlights of King of Two Miles Competition

Mitchell Fitzpatrick Team Applied Ballistics King of Two 2 Miles KO2M long range .375 Berger Bullets Kelly McMillan

Extreme Long Range — 2477 Yards
Notably, two Applied Ballistics team shooters made hits at 2477 yards. Just how far is that? Take a look at the photo above — that shows the location of the 2477-yard target with the firing line in the far distance. Now THAT is truly long range!

By Paul Phillips
I wanted to share a video that I made. This was from the King of 2 Miles event held recently in Raton, New Mexico. I was fortunate enough to be apart of an amazing team with Bryan Litz and Mitchell Fitzpatrick. We had some awesome sponsors: Berger Bullets, Nightforce Optics, McMillan Group International, Lethal Precision Arms LLC and Applied Ballistics LLC. Team Applied Ballistics took First, Second, and Fourth places out of 38 teams in this competition. Our Team highlight was working together to make first-round hits on a 24×36 inch plate at 1.4 miles. With me as coach, both Mitchell and Bryan made their first-round hits at 1.4 miles (2477 yards to be exact).

Video Shows Team Accomplishing Hits at 2477 Yards in Raton, NM

This event has been a personal goal of mine for a long time and I wanted to thank Bryan Litz and Mitchell Fitzpatrick for having me on the team. I call them quiet professionals. I also wanted to thank Kelly McMillan for sponsoring our team and being involved. Kelly has been an amazing sponsor and advocate for shooting sports and providing stocks and rifles for our military snipers for the past 40 years. I can’t forget to thank Ian Klemm for loaning me his Vortex Spotting scope with the MOA milling reticle. It worked great and was very fast to make corrections along with good glass.

Mitchell Fitzpatrick Team Applied Ballistics King of Two 2 Miles KO2M long range .375 Berger Bullets Kelly McMillan

Mitchell Fitzpatrick won the KO2M finals to earn the title “King of Two Miles”. He had a dominant performance shooting a .375 Lethal Precision Arms LLC rifle loaded with prototype solid 400gr Berger bullets. Mitchell built this rifle himself using a McMillan A5 Super Mag stock. Note: Berger has no current plans to market this .375-caliber bullet — it is still in the prototype stage.

Editor: Paul Phillips asked to make a special dedication, remembering a family member: “My brother Daniel Phillips passed away with brain cancer last year and this event was one that he wanted to video for me. I know he is smiling in heaven.”

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills 2 Comments »
July 24th, 2016

A Short History of the .220 Swift Cartridge

Sierra Bullets 220 .220 Swift Cartridge powder loading Hodgdon

A History of the .220 Swift Cartridge

by Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Paul Box
Sierra Bullets 220 .220 Swift Cartridge powder loading HodgdonThis cartridge was introduced by Winchester in 1935 in their model 54 rifle. A year later, it was added as a standard cartridge in the model 70. What might not be common knowledge to some reloaders is that the prototype for the Swift was developed in 1934-35 by Grosvenor Wotkyns by necking down the 250 Savage case, but in the end, Winchester chose the 6mm Lee Navy case for the foundation for this cartridge.

This cartridge was far ahead of its time and for that reason it received a lot of bad press. We’ve all read the horror stories through the years. Many of those stories were just simply repeated from previous articles even the wording was just slightly different. So how bad was the Swift? Let’s take a deeper look.

Some of the early Swifts had soft barrel steel and some of the rare ones even had barrels that were .223 in bore size. This stemmed from the fact that the .22 Hornets prior to the end of World War II were .223 in bore size and some of these barrels were chambered in the Swift. It was rumored that the Swift peaked in pressure far too quick. I’ll bet they did with a turkey extra full choke barrel.

Burn rates of powders were limited at that time as well, so the Swift was limited in its true ability due to that. It was almost like building a funny car for drag racing when only kerosene was available.

One of the longest lasting black eyes was that it shot barrels out so fast. If you get the barrel branding iron hot and fail to clean it often this can happen. Common sense will go a long ways here. Keep the barrel as cool as you can and properly clean it every fifteen rounds or less will go a long way to improving accuracy life of a Swift.

Sierra Bullets 220 .220 Swift Cartridge powder loading Hodgdon

So what is the real truth about this cartridge? I’m glad you ask. I’ve been shooting the .220 Swift for over 43 years now. It is one of the best varmint cartridges I’ve ever owned. It is not hard to load for, it doesn’t suddenly peak in pressure and it isn’t the barrel burner that you’ve heard. Hodgdon powders once reported a Remington 40-X with over 3,000 rounds of full power loads averaged .344” for five, 5-shot groups. My findings have been the same. It isn’t as hard on barrels as it has been made out to be.

I’ve also read that down loading it slightly will help in barrel life. This is true, but if you buy a thoroughbred you want him to run. Barrels are threaded on the end for a reason. If you have enough fun to shoot out a Swift barrel, just rebarrel it.

The bottom line is enjoy the .220 Swift for what it was meant to be. The popularity of the Swift has slipped in the last twenty years and few factory rifles are now available in this caliber. There is no reason for this and I know the Swift will always have a strong and loyal following.

Sierra Bullets 220 Swift Cartridge Guide

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting 5 Comments »
July 24th, 2016

Zediker Book Helps with Build-You-Own AR-15 Projects

AR15 Varmint rifle AR gunsmithing robert whitley

AR15 construction guideMany of our readers use AR-type rifles for Service Rifle matches, varmint hunting, 3-Gun competition, or defensive use. AR-platform rifles can be configured in a multitude of ways to suit the application. But if you plan to put together your own purpose-built AR rifle, how do you get started?

For AR Do-It-Yourselfers, we suggest reading Glen Zedicker’s book, the Competitive AR-15 Builders Guide. Following on Zedicker’s New AR-15 Competitive Rifle book (2008), the Builders Guide provides step-by-step instructions that will help non-professional “home builders” assemble a competitive match or varmint rifle. This book isn’t for everyone — you need some basic gun assembly experience and an aptitude for tools. But the AR-15 Builders’ Guide provides a complete list of the tools you’ll need for the job, and Zedicker outlines all the procedures to build an AR-15 from start to finish.

One of our Forum members who purchased the AR-15 Builders Guide confirms it is a great resource: “Much like any of the books Mr. Zediker puts out this one is well thought-out and is a no nonsense approach to AR building. I can not stress how helpful this book is from beginner to expert level.”

Along with assembly methods, this book covers parts selection and preparation, not just hammers and pins. Creedmoor Sports explains: “Knowing how to get what you want, and be happy with the result, is truly the focus of this book. Doing it yourself gives you a huge advantage. The build will honestly have been done right, and you’ll know it! Little problems will have been fixed, function and performance enhancements will have been made, and the result is you’ll have a custom-grade rifle without paying custom-builder prices.” Creedmoor Sports sells this Zediker AR-15 book and many other excellent shooting books. Visit www.creedmoorsports.com/category/Books or call 1-800-CREEDMOOR.

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
July 23rd, 2016

New Tikka TSR-1 Precision Rifle for PRS Competition

Tikka TSR-1 T3 Precison Rifle Series Beretta McCrees Precision Modular Stock PRS Production Class

Here’s good news for Precision Rifle Series (PRS) competitors. Tikka will offer a new, modular T3-based Precision Rifle for the PRS Production Rifle Class. This new, sub-$2000 Precision Rifle is a joint project between Beretta U.S.A. and McRees Precision. Tikka’s new, limited edition TSR-1 Precision Rifle combines the barrel and action of the Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle with a modular aluminum chassis from McRees Precision. Tikka TSR-1 production will be limited to 400 pieces and will have a $1995.00 MSRP. Initially, chamberings will be .260 Remington or .308 Winchester.

According to RecoilWeb.com: “The TSR-1 features a McRee’s Precision G10 folding rifle stock with an M-LOK compatible fore end, adjustable LOP and cheek riser, McRee’s M-LEV integrated cant indicator, upper and lower Picatinny rails, QD sling swivel sockets, and a sniper grey Cerakote finish.” The T3 action is fitted with a +20 MOA Mountain Tactical Scope rail, and the barrel comes with a 5/8×24 threaded muzzle. Beretta even includes one of McRee’s Rear Stock Packs.

Phillip Jones, Beretta’s Product Manager for Rifles, says: “Combining the … Tikka T3 Compact Tactical Rifle with McRee’s combat-tested chassis offers the long distance and precision shooting enthusiast an accurate and reliable rifle that is priced aggressively to be eligible for the Production Division of the PRS Series.” Under PRS rules, Production Class rifles may cost no more than $2000.00 (without optic):

PRS Production Class Cost Limits
Production Division combined rifle and scope MSRP as listed on the company’s website shall not exceed $3,000 USD, the rifle shall not exceed $2,000 USD and the optic not exceed $2,000 USD. [Editor: For example, you could have a $2,000 rifle with a $1000.00 scope or vice-versa. The total system cannot exceed $3000. Rifle alone cannot exceed $2000.00 retail sale price.]

Production Division rifles are not permitted to be altered or improved in any way from the original factory configuration”

Tikka TSR-1 T3 Precison Rifle Series Beretta McCrees Precision Modular Stock PRS Production Class

In developing the Tikka TSR-1, Beretta was no doubt inspired by the huge success of the Ruger Precision Rifle, which sold out its initial production run. Scott McRee, owner of McRees Precision, is enthusiastic about how the market will respond to new Tikka TSR-1: “I am confident that the sport shooting, tactical run and gun competitor, as well as the law enforcement community will enjoy this offering. It’s an honor to be working with Beretta U.S.A. and to be helping them provide another superb product to the American market.”

Permalink Competition, New Product, Tactical 5 Comments »
July 23rd, 2016

Maggie’s Drawers at Camp Perry

Ever wonder what “Maggie’s Drawers” means? Well, in the shooting community it means a complete miss on the target, as originally indicated by a large red flag. In this 1957 photo, the U.S. Army brought the targets to the students at the annual Small Arms Firing School. Wheeled carts with “demo” targets were positioned at the firing line, between shooting stations, so trainees could better see the procedures. Soldiers demonstrated firing a shot, scoring the target and scorecard on the Camp Perry firing line. Targets in use at the time were the “V” type. In this demonstration shot, the pit worker waves a red flag, known as “Maggie’s Drawers”, signifying a miss. This old photo comes from the Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) Archives.

CMP Maggie's Drawers Camp Perry AccurateShooter.com

If you click the gray tab to view the photo full-screen, you can see something extra. Look carefully at the horizon below the muzzle of the M1 Garand held by the shooter in the foreground. If you look carefully, you can see a crane being used to erect the beach tower that now watches over Lake Erie and the ranges when they are “hot”.

Origin of ‘Maggie’s Drawers’ Term
CMP Maggie's Drawers Camp Perry AccurateShooter.comHap Rocketto, noted shooting historian, has explained the etymology of “Maggie’s Drawers”. This term “refers to the red flag waved vigorously across the face of the target to signify a complete miss of the target during practice”. The term came in use in the early 20th Century (prior to WWI) when flags were used to signal shot locations on long-range rifle targets.

Hap writes: “Since [the early 20th Century] the target has changed to the decimal bull and the marking system has been revised several times. Flags are no longer used, being replaced by value panels and chalk boards. However, one term from the flag days has held on with a tenacity that is indicative of the strong traditions of the high power community. If a shooter had the misfortune of firing a miss a red flag was waved across the front of the target. The flag is commonly known as ‘Maggie’s Drawers’ giving us the term now generally used to refer to a miss. The term ‘Maggie’s Drawers’ seems to be based on, as many things are in the military, a bawdy song. Prior to The Great War there was an old music hall song entitled The Old Red Flannel Drawers That Maggie Wore which [was creatively altered], as things tend to be by the troops, into something less delicate than might have been sung in vaudeville in the United States or in British music halls of the day.”

Visit Southwest Rifle Shooting Blog, to read the full story about the origin of Maggie’s Drawers. Hap even includes the naughty lyrics of the old music hall song that gave rise to the expression.

Permalink Competition, News 1 Comment »
July 23rd, 2016

Add a PVC Bag-Rider to Your Stock for Pennies

PVC Pipe Bag-Rider sandbag

We know you guys like do-it-yourself (DIY) projects. And we also know that our readers like anything that helps a rifle sit more securely in the bags, and track better on recoil. Here’s a little accessory you can make yourself for pennies that will help rifles with conventional (non-benchrest) stocks ride the rear bag better.

This DIY Bag-Rider is simple in design and easy to make. The invention of Forum member Bill L. (aka “Nomad47″), this is simply a short section of PVC pipe attached to the bottom of a wood stock with a couple of screws. The back half of the PVC tube is cut at an angle to match the lower profile of the stock. Nomad47 painted the PVC Bag-Rider black for sex appeal, but that’s not really necessary.

In the top photo you can see Nomad47’s bagrider attached to a Savage varminter. In the photo below, the PVC bag-rider tube is fitted to an F-TR style rig with a green, laminated thumbhole stock. This rifle also features a Savage action with a custom barrel and “wide-track” bipod. (Note: to be legal in F-Class competition, the muzzle brake would have to be removed.)

PVC Pipe Bag-Rider sandbag

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July 22nd, 2016

Reiter Becomes First Quadruple Distinguished Shooter in History

Steve Steven Reiter Distinguished marksman quadruple Badges Team Lapua

Steve Steven Reiter Distinguished marksman quadruple Badges Team LapuaQuadruple Distinguished Marksman
You are looking at a very special human being — the world’s only holder of FOUR Distinguished Marksmanship Badges. While competing in the 2016 National Trophy Pistol Matches at Camp Perry, Team Lapua’s Steve Reiter (Tucson, AZ) became the first Quadruple Distinguished Badge Marksman in history. This past week, 74-year-old Reiter received his most recent Distinguished Badge, the new .22 Rimfire Pistol Badge, which has only been in existence since 2015. Before that, Reiter had earned his Pistol Distinguished Badge in 1972, his International Badge in 1973, and his Rifle Distinguished Badge in 1998. Over his four-decade competitive career, Reiter has competed in free pistol, standard pistol, air pistol, and centerfire events as well as rifle.

Earning FOUR Distinguished Badges is a great achievement — something that has never been done before, much less by a Senior shooter. We offer our congratulations to Steve for achieving this first-ever, shooting milestone.

Practice and Hard Work Were Key Says Reiter
Reiter told us: “It’s a big honor, really. When you’re the first at anything, it’s a big honor. It feels great to be the first.” Steve added: “Most people don’t understand how much work it is. And it being a CMP badge … it means something.”

To be a successful marksman, Steve explained, it takes dedication and lots of practice: “You have to work pretty hard. More or less, you have to do a lot of practicing and a lot of dry-firing, and actually work at it. You can’t come out here and just shoot. You’ve got to really work at it, like anything else, to get to the top of your field.”

A former U.S. Army Reserve Team member, Reiter’s list of shooting honors over his 40-year competition career is truly remarkable:

Member of the 1980 Olympic team in Free Pistol
Five-time National Champion at Camp Perry
34 Overall National Championship Titles
44 National Records
40+ Regional Championships
Two-time President’s 100 Champion in Pistol
Two-time National Trophy Individual Match Champion in Pistol
10-time Winner of the National Match High Senior Pistol Trophy
Five-time Winner of Citizens’ Military Pistol Trophy
Canada International Service Pistol Champion
Two-time Free Pistol National Champion
Standard Pistol National Champion
Seven-time Interservice Championship Team Member

In addition to these titles, Reiter also set other numerical scoring records, including the best .22 Aggregate (899), and the best Three-Gun Aggregate Score (2671).

Nammo Reiter Distinguished LapuaTeam Lapua — Supporting Excellence
Lapua, or more officially Nammo Lapua Oy, is part of the large Nordic Nammo Group. Our main products are small caliber cartridges and components. The Lapua cartridge factory was established in 1923. From a modest and practical beginning, Lapua has grown into one of the most respected brands in the industry. The best shooters in the world choose Lapua cartridges and components. In 2014, Nammo acquired the Vihtavuori smokeless powder factory.

Permalink Competition, News 2 Comments »
July 22nd, 2016

CCI Offers Lead-Free .22 LR Ammo with Copper Matrix Bullets

Copper-22 CCI varmint HV ammo 1850 fps polymer ammunition compressed matrix

Now there is a new type of “lead-free” rimfire ammo that can be used in areas where lead is prohibited. CCI’s new .22 LR Copper-22 ammunition features hollow-point bullets made from a compressed copper + polymer matrix. This is a speedy round — Muzzle Velocity (MV) is a blistering 1850 FPS, very fast for a .22 LR round. CCI claims accuracy is excellent. We look forward to testing this new Copper-22 rimfire ammo to confirm CCI’s speed and accuracy claims. Running at 1850 FPS, this looks like it could be a very effective varmint round.

Copper-22 Ammo Features & Benefits:

  • Non-lead bullet suited for plinking, target-shooting and small game hunting.
  • 21-grain hollow-point bullet, with compressed copper-polymer construction.
  • Legal to use in California and other zones where lead is prohibited.
  • 1,850 FPS muzzle velocity with excellent accuracy.

The Copper-22 projectile is constructed from a unique mix of copper particles and polymer compressed into a potent, 21-grain bullet. This non-lead bullet is suited for plinking, target-shooting and small game hunting. Shipments of this Copper-22 ammo (CCI part No. 925CC) are now being delivered to dealers. For more info, visit www.cci-ammunition.com.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting 3 Comments »
July 21st, 2016

Insane Railgun Accuracy — Lozano Sets Two World Records

Benchrest NBRSA Unlimited Railgun Grand Agg World Record, Visalia

You are looking at one of the most impressive examples of precision shooting in history. On each of those five targets is a five-shot group made at 100 yards. This is the best set of five targets ever shot consecutively at 100 yards in the history of firearms competition on this planet. That’s right, nobody has ever drilled a better set of five, five-shot targets. The combined Aggregate for these five targets is a stunning 0.1014″, with the individual groups measuring: 0.102″, 0.168″, 0.123″, 0.053″, and 0.061″. So, two of the five groups were in the Zeros. And the 0.1014″ Agg handily beats existing world records.

Benchrest NBRSA Unlimited Railgun Grand Agg World Record, Visalia

This is an amazing accomplishment that beats both the existing NBRSA and IBS records. The NBRSA Record 100-yard Unlimited 5×5 Aggregate is 0.1242 set by Jerry Lahr in 2012. The IBS Record Heavy Benchrest 100-yard Aggregate (for five, 5-shot groups) is 0.134″, set by R. Howell in 2004.

But there’s more…

Lozano Grand Agg of 0.1226 also Breaks IBS and NBRSA World Records
George Lozano also shot a superb five-target Aggregate at 200 yards: 0.1439. This gave him a combined 100 + 200 Grand Aggregate of .1226 which is also a new world record. NOTE: for the 200-yard Agg, the actual group measurements (in inches) are summed, averaged and then divided by two to provide equivalency with the 100-yard results. Lozano’s actual group measurements at 200 yards were: 0.205″, 0.307″, 0.220″, 0.409″, and 0.298″. As averaged and divided by two, that is 0.1439. When combined with George’s 0.1014 100-yard Agg, Lozano’s 100+200 Grand Agg is a stunning 0.1226.

Benchrest NBRSA Unlimited Railgun Grand Agg World Record, Visalia

Lozano’s 0.1226 Grand Agg breaks both NBRSA and IBS World Records. The current NBRSA Unlimited Grand Agg Record for five, 5-shot groups at both 100 and 200 yards is a 0.133 by Dave Dowd in 2012. The equivalent 100 + 200 IBS Heavy Benchrest Grand Agg Record is a 0.1575 by Lester Bruno in 2004.

Benchrest NBRSA Unlimited Railgun Grand Agg World Record, Visalia

The talented shooter, George Lozano (shown above), was modest about his achievement: “Thanks, guys. I appreciate your very kind compliments. It was a good Father’s Day weekend and a fun match.”

NOTE: These records are pending verification by the NBRSA official records committee. But based on the numbers we’ve seen, it looks like Lozano will soon find his name in the record books.

Technical Details
We don’t know much about George Lozano’s load — either the powder or bullet. We’re told he was shooting a 6PPC cartridge in an Unlimited Benchrest rig, also known as a “railgun”. Here is a photo of a modern benchrest railgun. This is NOT Lozano’s record-breaking rig, but it shows the type of hardware used in the modern Unlimited Class.

Unlimited Benchrest rifle railgun Visalia

For more information, visit the Benchrest Central Forum which has threads on Lozano’s 100-Yard Agg and Grand Agg. Great shooting George — congratulations!

Railgun Record Tip from Boyd Allen. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Competition, News 5 Comments »
July 21st, 2016

.45 ACP Quick Guide — Reloading and 1911 Field Stripping

Do you shoot a .45 ACP? We love this short, fat cartridge because it is inherently accurate, it makes big, easy-to-see holes in paper, and because it it works so well in the classic 1911 series of pistols. It is hard to beat a good, tuned model 1911 when it comes to trigger pull/reset and natural pointing ability.

Once you get the hang of it, 1911-type pistols are also easy to field strip for cleaning. Here is a video showing how to disassemble and reassemble your model 1911:

Model 1911 Field Stripping and Reassembly

.45 ACP Ammunition Loading Guide

If you “roll your own” .45 ACP cartridges, there are many good powder choices. Our favorites are Vihtavuori N320, AA No. 5, and Hodgdon TiteGroup, but there are many other good choices. You’ll find these three recommended powders (plus seven others) in this .45 ACP Reloading Guide from Nosler:

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Handguns, Reloading 1 Comment »
July 21st, 2016

New Rapid Ordering System for McMillan “Inlet Ready” Stocks

McMillan Fiberglass stocks inlet ready order free shipping retail store

With McMillan’s new “Inlet Ready” series of fiberglass stocks, you can get a customized McMillan stock in just two to four weeks. Use the web-based stock selector in McMillan’s online Retail Store.

To get to the Inlet Ready section, from the McMillan Home Page click “Retail Store“, then select “Stocks in Inventory” from the left-hand column. After clicking “Stocks in Inventory” from the left column, select “Inlet Ready” from the sub-menu. This video explains how to order your Inlet Ready stock for delivery in two to four weeks:

Get Free Shipping with Orders Over $400.00
Here’s another way you can save on purchases of McMillan stocks and shooting accessories. Go to McMillan’s online Retail Store. Choose stocks, bipods, gun cases, ammunition, apparel, triggers, and other items offered for sale. Then, during check-out, use Promo CODE mcm16. This will provide FREE Shipping if your total order is $400.00 or more.

NOTE: Free shipping applies to orders over $400, standard ground delivery in the Continental USA. Shipping charges on previous orders will not be reimbursed. This offer cannot be combined with other promotions or offers.

Product and Sale tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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