July 4th, 2015

Celebrate Independence Day — And Remember our History

American USA Flag

Today, July 4th, we are celebrating a special birthday — the launching of a new nation that would become the world’s greatest exemplar of freedom and democracy. It is easy to lose sight of the challenges that faced our fore-fathers, and the continuing burdens we all share, as Americans, to maintain freedom at home and stand as an example to other peoples engaged in the struggle for democracy. It is more important than ever that we remember the ideals on which the nation was founded, and remember that our nation became great through the efforts and talents of a free citizenry.

It’s easy to think of fun, sun, and relaxation over the 4th of July weekend. Ball games, picnics, and fireworks may be foremost in our minds on July 4th, but we should take the time to contemplate the real significance of this day.

The Founding Fathers launched an incredibly risky and radical undertaking in 1776 — breaking away from English rule, and challenging the forces of the British Empire, the most powerful political entity the world had ever known.

Study the Revolutionary War, and you’ll learn that America’s bid for independence was a “long-shot” endeavor — the odds of success were poor. On the battlefield, our revolutionary armies were defeated many times by the British, and Gen. George Washington himself believed the Revolution was a lost cause on many occasions. In celebrating the 4th of July, we should honor the courage and dedication of those who fought for independence. We should also take time to consider the principles set out in the Declaration of Independence itself. Have we, as a nation, remained faithful to these tenets?:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, that whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

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July 4th, 2015

Need Powder? Check out Midsouth Shooters Supply

reloading Powder Sale Midsouth discount

It’s July 4th, that means fireworks displays. What better time to order up some gunpowder. We’re pleased to report that Midsouth Shooters Supply has received some big shipments from the major powder makers. In stock now at Midsouth are many of the most popular accuracy powders, including: Hodgdon 4198, Hodgdon 4831, IMR 4166, IMR 8208 XBR, Vithavuori N133, Accurate LT30 and LT32, Norma 203B, Alliant AR Comp, and many more. Sorry Midsouth doesn’t have Varget or H4350, but Midsouth has the vast majority of the propellants our benchrest and precision shooters favor.

Hodgdon H4198 and LT30 are great for the 30BR, AR Comp and CFE 223 are excellent for Service Rifle shooters, VV N133 is a top choice for the 6PPC, Norma 203B (nearly identical to Reloder 15) is great in the 6mmBR and Dasher, IMR 8208 XBR is very accurate in the .308 Win, and Hodgdon 4831 is an excellent choice for the .284 Winchester and 7mm WSM.

All these popular Powders (and many more) are in stock:

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July 4th, 2015

Discount Codes for Precision Reloading

Precision Reloading July 4 independence day discount code sale

As an Independence Day Special for shooters, Precision Reloading is offering signficant savings on web orders. Use Coupon Code 4PR1 to save $10 on orders of $100 or more, or use Coupon Code 4PR2 to save $25.00 on orders of $250 or more. These promo codes are valid through midnight on July 5th (Sunday), 2015. To order, visit PrecisionReloading.com.

Precision Reloading (800-223-0900) has a large selection of inventory for hand-loaders, including Berger bullets, Hodgdon and IMR powders, and Lapua brass and bullets. Valid on regular priced in-stock internet orders only — No Backorders. Offer expires 07-31-2015.

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July 3rd, 2015

Leupold VX-6 7-42x56mm Scope Test by Target Shooter UK

Leupold Competition scope Nightforce 7-42x56mm scope optic F-TR F-Class lifetime Warranty

Our friend Vince Bottomley has reviewed the Leupold VX-6 7-42x56mm scope for Target Shooter Magazine, a UK-based webzine. Vince put Leupold’s new 7-42X through its paces, testing its suitability for F-Class competition. Vince liked the scope. The glass was bright and the clicks were repeatable. Point of impact did not change after zooming from 7X all the way out to 42X. Finding the view “crystal-clear and sharp” at 42X, Vince concluded that “the Leupold would be very shootable at max power.

Interestingly, the vertical elevation clicks are 1/8 MOA while the horizontal clicks are 1/4 MOA.* Vince found that a bit confusing, but “all other controls — the side-focus [parallax], zoom-ring, and European-style ocular focus-ring are spot-on and moved with a reassuringly precise feel.”

READ Target Shooter Magazine Leupold VX-6 7-42x56mm SCOPE TEST

Here are some highlights from Vince Bottomley’s review:

Initial reaction? It looks right – not as chunky as a Schmidt, not long and slim like the new Nightforce, just right in fact – like the March and the new SV 10-50 Sightron. In line with the new breed of high-end optics, it sports a 34mm body-tube but, weight-wise it’s bang on the money at 26.5 oz – the same as my 8-32 Sightron and lighter than the 28 oz. Nightforce Competition 15-55.

Are odd ounces that important? Yes they are – to weight-conscious F-TR shooters, who may be attracted by this scope as an alternative to the March 10-60X – which is even lighter at a tad under 25 ounces. Putting together an effective F-TR gun is all about making compromises – pick a 10-60 March over the 15-55 Nightforce and you can add an inch to your barrel!

With just 55 MOA of elevation adjustment, the VX-6 isn’t over-generous but of course, tapered scope-rails are now readily available for most rifles if you need more MOA. Windage is adequate at 45 MOA.

Leupold Competition scope Nightforce 7-42x56mm scope optic F-TR F-Class lifetime Warranty

In conclusion, this is a very fine long-range target scope, which should definitely appeal to serious F-Class shooters and must be considered alongside the 10-60 March and 15-55 Nightforce Competition scopes. Also, the Leupold lifetime ‘no quibble’ guarantee is the best in the business – if you can’t make up your mind, this could be the deal-maker.


*Actually, the true click values are closer to 1/8 inch and 1/4 inch (rather than 1/8 MOA and 1/4 MOA). To calibrate the true click values, Vince took a baseline shot then wound on 20 MOA “up” vertical. His second shot impacted 19.875″ higher. One MOA is 1.047 inches, so 20 MOA should have measured 20.94″ inches. So his 20 MOA was off by about 1 inch, or 5%. This variance is not unusual, and it demonstrates why you should always verify your true scope values before shooting a match.

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July 3rd, 2015

Download Free 2015 Alliant Powders Reloading Guide

Alliant powder ATK Vista Outdoors Reloder Reloading Guide

You can quickly access loads for Alliant powders via Alliant’s Online Reloader’s Guide. There you’ll find hundreds of recipes for rifle loads, pistol loads, and shotshell loads. While it’s handy to use the Alliant website when you have a live connection, you can also download the Alliant Reloaders’ Guide in PDF format for off-line viewing. That way you can archive the Guide on your computer, or keep the file on a mobile device for use in the field or workshop.

CLICK HERE to DOWNLOAD ALLIANT RELOADER’S GUIDE (PDF format).

Alliant powder ATK Vista Outdoors Reloder Reloading Guide

Popular Alliant Rifle Powders

Alliant 2400
1200-R
2000-MR
4000-MR
AR Comp
Reloder 7
Reloder 10X
Reloder 15
Reloder 17
Reloder 19
Reloder 22
Reloder 23
Reloder 25
Reloder 26
Reloder 33
Reloder 50
Varmint

CLICK HERE for eZine Version of Guide

Alliant’s 116-page PDF Reloader’s Guide includes recipes for shotgun, pistol, and rifle. This guide includes important safety instructions, plus reloading data for most popular cartridges. The guide includes Alliant’s new Reloder 23, 26 and Power Pro powders. Most of the listed rifle loads are for Speer bullets, but there are also loads with Barnes, Berger, Hornady, Nosler and Sierra bullets.

Get FREE Print (Paper) Alliant Reloader’s Guide
You can also get a FREE PRINT VERSION of the 2015 Alliant Powder Reloader’s Guide. Just CLICK HERE and fill out your name and address. Allow 3-4 weeks for delivery.

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July 2nd, 2015

The .300 Lapua Magnum (30-338) — Big Power for Big Game

.300 Lapua Magnum 30-338 .30-338 Elk Hunting Rifle

Not many folks are familiar with the .300 Lapua Magnum, but this big boomer is an official CIP-certified cartridge for which Vihtavuori offers load data. This necked-down version of the .338 Lapua Magnum makes one heck of a hunting cartridge. In our article on the .300 Lapua Magnum (aka 30-338 LM), you’ll find expert advice on forming the cases from .338 Lapua Magnum brass plus tips on selecting powder and bullets. The story also features some great photos of a 30-338 custom Richard Franklin built for a California client. That rifle is designed as an Elk Gun, shooting the 190gr Berger VLDs with Reloder 22 powder. The laminated stock is made from exhibition-grade Claro Crotch Walnut and Dennis Smith (aka the Stock Doctor) provided beautiful checkering and a hand-rubbed oil finish.

30-338 Elk Rifle

.300 Lapua Magnum

Ultimate Varmint Cartridge?
Franklin has also pioneered an ultra-high-velocity varmint version of the 30-338 LM. This cartidge achieves amazing 30-Cal velocities using long, very slow-twist barrels. Richard tells us: “I use 15- to 17-twist barrels with both the 300 WSM Varminter and the 30-338 Lapua Varminter. The 300 WSM easily gets 3900 fps with the Nosler 125gr Ballistic Tip and the 30-338 Lapua will do 4150 fps easily with the same 125gr B-Tip. In the 30-338 LM, the 130gr Barnes, a “ringed” bullet with grooves to reduce bearing surface, will get another 150 fps, topping out at 4300 fps. I find the 17-twist does a good job with the light bullets in the 30-338 but I’m going to try an 18-twist and a 19-twist to see if high velocity is a little more easier to obtain. I believe the 19-twist will beat any thing I’ve built to date for velocity and I also believe it’s going to be very accurate.”

The “Official” .300 Lapua Magnum
While nearly every 30-338 you see in the USA is a wildcat, manually formed by necking-down the .338 Lapua brass, there was an “official” version, the “.300 Lapua Magnum”. This was a factory 30-caliber cartridge based on the .338 Lapua Magnum parent case. Lapua produced enough factory ammo to get the .300 Lapua Magnum sanctioned as an official CIP-certified cartridge. QuickLOAD includes the .300 Lapua Magnum in its load database, and QuickDESIGN has complete CIP cartridge specifications. Unfortunately, the .300 Lapua Magnum is no longer in production. For you cartridge collectors, we’re not even sure if Lapua ever produced brass with a distinctive “300 Lapua Magnum” headstamp. However Vihtavuori does include .300 Lapua Magnum load data in the current Vihtavuori Load Manual. That reloading guide shows the .300 Lapua Magnum can drive a 220gr HPBT Sierra MatchKing at 3044 fps with a max charge of VV 24N41 powder. The .300 Lapua Magnum can push the 30-caliber 155gr Lapua Scenar at nearly 3500 fps with VV N170 powder. That’s impressive performance indeed!

CLICK HERE to download Current Vihtavuori RELOADING MANUAL (35-page .pdf file).

300 Lapua Magnum CIP

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July 2nd, 2015

New .338 Lapua Magnum Target Rifle from Savage

Savage Model 112 .338 Lapua magnum

Want to go big…on a budget? Then check out the new Savage Model 112 in .338 Lapua Magnum. MSRP for this new rifle is just $1177 and “street price” should be considerably lower. That’s tempting. Most factory target rifles chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum are quite expensive (and you could easily spend four grand or more on a full custom .338 LM). The new single-shot Model 112 Magnum Target from Savage Arms provides a much more affordable platform for the powerful cartridge. (In the photo below at the bottom of this story, you can see the .338 LM compared to .308 Win and 6mmBR. The .338 LM is definitely a brute of a cartridge.)

Savage Model 112 .338 Lapua magnum

.338 Lapua Magnum Savage .308 Winchester 6mmbrThe new rifle features a single-shot Magnum Target Action coupled to a 26″ heavy barrel fitted with a big muzzle brake. The Target AccuTrigger adjusts to a minimum pull-weight of 6 ounces. Rifle weight, without scope, is 12 pounds. The gray/brown laminated stock features a near-vertical grip with a moderate amount of drop in the buttstock. We’ve used this same-type stock on other Savages. It is comfortable and works well with a bipod. However, you may want to add a “bag-rider” in the rear for better tracking.

More .338 Lapua Options from Savage
The new Model 112 Magnum in .338 Lapua Magnum is currently offered in a right-hand, single-shot version only. If you prefer a .338 LM rifle with a magazine, Savage offers three other rifles chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum which all feature 5-round detachable box magazines:

1. Model 110 BA, Law Enforcement Series, $2638 MSRP.
2. Model 10/110 FCP HS Precision Stock, $1726 MSRP.
3. Model 11/111 Long Range Hunter, $1380 MSRP.

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July 2nd, 2015

Use Stub Gauge to Check Shoulder ‘Bump’ and Seating Depth

Forum member Rich DeSimone uses a handy “Stub Gauge” for setting shoulder “bump” and seating depth. The gauge is made from a section of barrel lopped off when the muzzle is crowned. The chambering reamer is run in about 1/4 of the way, enough to capture the neck and shoulder area of the case. Rich then uses his full-length die to “bump” a master case with the ideal amount of headspace for easy feeding and extraction. He takes that case and sets it in this Stub Gauge, and measures from the front of the gauge to the rim. He can then quickly compare any fired case to a his “master” case with optimal headspace. Since the gauge measures off the shoulder datum, this tells him how much to bump his fired brass.

In addition, the Stub Gauge can be used to set bullet seating-depth. Rich has a channel cut transversely on one side of the gauge, exposing the throat area. Since the interior of the gauge is identical to the chamber in his gun, this lets him see where a seated bullet engages the rifling. He can tinker with bullet seating length until he gets just the right amount of land contact on the bullet, confirmed visually. Then he measures the case OAL and sets his seating dies accordingly. This is much handier than using a Stoney Point Tool to measure distance to the lands. As your barrel’s throat wears, you may seat your bullets out further to “chase the lands”, but the gauge provides a constant land engagement point, in the barrel’s “as new” condition. By measuring the difference between the land contact point on the gauge and the actual contact point on your barrel, you can determine throat “migration”.

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July 1st, 2015

Nearly a Third of Americans Own Guns

Gun Ownership Study 2015 Columbia Injury Prevention

As an American firearms owner, you’re in good company. A new Columbia University Study indicates that nearly 30% of American adults own at least one gun. As you might expect, state gun ownership rates varied greatly. States with low population density showed a higher percentage of gun owners. The Top Five gun-owning states were: Alaska (61.9%), Arkansas (57.9%), Idaho (56.9%), West Virginia (54.2%), and Wyoming (53.8%). As you’d expect Montana (52.3%) and New Mexico (49.9%) were in the Top Ten, but to our surprise Texas, at 35.5%, was not. Must be those Yuppies in Austin …

Two East Coast micro-states were at the bottom of the scale, with gun ownership rates under 6%. Delaware, at 5.2%, had the lowest percentage of gun owners, followed by Rhode Island (5.8%).

The gun ownership study, published on the Injury Prevention website, showed that 29.1% of Americans over age 18 own firearms. Results were based on a web survey of a representative sample of 4000 persons from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. CLICK HERE to Read Full Study.

Gun Ownership Study 2015 Columbia Injury Prevention

Gun Culture Supports Firearm Ownership
The study also tried to assess the impact of “gun culture” on gun ownership rates. Not surprisingly, where family and social group attitudes favored gun ownership, more people owned guns: “Gun ownership was 2.25 times greater among those reporting social gun culture. Exposure to social gun culture was robustly associated with gun ownership and to our knowledge, this is the first study to establish empirical evidence of the relation between social gun culture and gun ownership.” However, “we cannot infer whether exposure to social gun culture predisposes one to gun ownership or whether the latter increases likelihood of participation in the former.”

General Findings
The study summarized its findings as follows: “A strong association between gun ownership and being a part of a social gun culture was observed, even after adjusting for significant covariates. The other individual covariates independently associated with gun ownership were age > 55 years, not black, male, income > $25 K, ever married/partnered and medium/high violence exposure.” Worthy of note is that the lead statistician for this project, Dr. Bindu Valesan, is a Vice-President of the Gun Violence Survivors Foundation (GVSP). She works as an Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University.

Because of Valesan’s association with the GVSP, some have challenged this study’s conclusions regarding “gun culture” and the reasons Americans own firearms. Nonetheless the findings regarding the percentage of Americans who own guns are noteworthy. These numbers show the importance of firearms to a huge segment of our society. If anything, the Columbia University Study numbers support the NRA’s claims that nearly half of American households own guns. In 2010, 39% of Americans surveyed by the Gallup Poll said they had a gun in their home. Infoplease.com states that the percentage of U.S. households with firearms: “has been fluctuating between 38% and 42% in polls taken since 2000, and has ranged between 36% and 51% since polling began in 1959.”

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July 1st, 2015

AR Brass Catcher — Great Accessory for Under Ten Bucks

Caldwell ar16 ar-15 ar brass casing bag net catcher

If you shoot an AR-platform rifle, you could probably use one of these gadgets. A brass-catcher keeps your brass in good shape and saves you the hassle of picking up fired cases. Moreover, nearby shooters no longer have to fear being pelted with your hot brass.

Caldwell ar16 ar-15 ar brass casing bag net catcher

We use a brass catcher whenever possible when shooting AR-platform rifles. These things are great when you’re bench-testing your AR, and they are also handy on a squirrel safari or prairie dog trip. You don’t have to dig around in the dirt to find your brass.

Right now the Caldwell AR Brass Catcher is just $7.99 on Amazon.com, with free shipping for Prime members. At that low price, AR shooters may want to give this a try. Keep your brass in better shape, avoid annoying brass recovery chores, and keep nearby shooters happy.

Watch this video to see how the brass catcher installs in seconds. A Velcro-secured collar wraps around the fore-arm. Spent cartridges are easily removed via a zipper at the bottom of the mesh bag which holds roughly 30 .223 Rem (5.56x45mm) cases.

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July 1st, 2015

The 6mm Super LR — .243 Winchester Made Better

6mm Super LR Gun

In our Forum recently, there was a discussion about “improved” cartridges based on the .243 Winchester parent case. One popular such cartridge is the Super LR, a 30° long-necked wildcat. The 6mm Super LR was developed by Robert Whitley, who wanted something similar to the 6XC, but with “more boiler room” to push the 115-grain bullets comfortably at 2950-3050 fps.

To illustrate the Super LR for interested readers, we dug into our archives and found a report on a 6mm Super LR varmint rifle belonging to Barry O. (aka “TheBlueEyedBear”), a long-time AccurateShooter Forum member. A few years back, Barry put together an impressive 6mm Super LR long-range varminter on a BAT SV action. Barry actually sourced many of the components for this rifle through our AccurateShooter Forum Free Classifieds. CLICK HERE to read all about Barry’s Super LR BAT-Actioned varmint rifle, featured in our popular Gun of the Week Series.

CLICK Photo to Read Full Story
BlueEyedBear Gun

The Richard Franklin walnut LowRider stock (above) for Barry’s rifle came from fellow Forum member “Preacher”, who also did most of the metal work. The gun is chambered as a 6mm Super LR.

6mm Super LR .243 Varminter

Super LR Whitley BlueEyedBear

6mm Super LR Cartridge Design and Loading Advice
by Robert Whitley, AR-X Enterprises
Conceptually, the 6mm Super LR is like a long-bodied 6XC (case body about .120″ longer). The Super LR has a long neck (.321″ vs. the .263″ long neck of the parent .243 Winchester case). The Super LR also has a 30° shoulder angle vs. the 20° shoulder angle of the .243 Winchester parent case. The Super LR has about 54 grains of H20 capacity, compared to 55 grains for the .243 Win and 49 grains H20 for the 6XC.

The Super LR has sufficient case capacity to shoot the 115gr 6mm bullets in the 2950 – 3000 fps range without being “on the edge” of maximum pressure. If you do not need to run sustained fire in long strings, you can “hot rod” things more. Testing has shown that the Super LR can run the 115s up around 3100 fps without issues. With the 105-108 grain 6mm bullets, the 6mm Super LR can push them up in the 3150-3200 fps range with the right powders. In addition, if you like to shoot the 105-108 grain bullets close to the lands, or engaging the lands, the Super LR cartridge case neck is long enough to give most of them a good bearing surface purchase, even if the chamber is throated for the 115gr bullets. That gives the 6mm Super LR cartridge great versatility.

The 30° shoulder angle of the 6mm Super LR is another good feature of the Super LR. Not only does it help to avoid the throat-torching effect that people associate with the .243 Winchester (because of the .243’s short neck and 20° shoulder angle), but the 30° shoulder angle has also been a hallmark of some very accurate cartridges such as the 6 PPC, 6mm BR, 6XC, and 6.5 x 47, to name a few.

6mm Super LR Whitley

The 6mm Super LR wildcat is easy to make. Robert Whitley figured out how to reform domestic .243 Win brass with one simple pass through a Redding 6mm Super LR full-length sizing die. Robert has commissioned these dies from Redding. Call Robert at (215) 348-8789 to order.Learn more about the 6mm Super LR on Whitley’s www.6mmAR.com website.

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June 30th, 2015

Yanks Win Creedmoor Cup Match in Ireland

2015 Creedmoor Cup F-Open F-Class Tullamore Dublin Ireland 2015 1875

Way to go Team USA! The American F-Class squad won the prestigious Creedmoor Cup competition held June 28-29 at the Midlands National Shooting Centre in Tullamore, Ireland. This is a competition with a rich history, going back to the original Challenge Match in 1874 between American and Irish Teams in Creedmoor, New York. (Read Match History)

2015 Creedmoor Cup F-Open F-Class Tullamore Dublin Ireland 2015 1875
Photo by Matthew Schwartzkopf.

Phil Kelley wrote: “I never knew when planning for this trip the wonderful history that is the Creedmoor Cup, Ireland and U.S. rifle competition, and the hunger of the Irish for freedom. It is one of many things that has made this trip so enjoyable. J.P. Craven [opened] the Creedmoor competition with John Sigler, previous President of the NRA. John had the honor of the first shot with a rifle used to help gain Irish independence. The Irish, like Americans, have a rich history that ties the rifle and independence together. It has been an honor to be part of this event, with each and every individual that is part of it.”

Read the rest of this entry »

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June 30th, 2015

Season 4 of NRA All Access Television Begins July 1st

Jessie Duff NRA All Access Television Outdoor Channel
One episode features target shooting with an Eliseo Tube Gun.

Season 4 of the NRA All Access television series kicks off July 1st, on the Outdoor Channel. This season the popular show will feature many competitive disciplines, including 3-Gun, High Power, Vintage Rifle, Action Pistol, and Trap/Skeet. The show also includes many hunting segments. In addition, NRA All Access will feature inspirational profiles on shooters who have overcome handicaps. Watch the Season 4 Premiere Wednesday, July 1 at 7:00 pm ET on the Outdoor Channel.

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June 30th, 2015

California’s Lead Ammo Hunting Ban Goes into Effect

California lead ammo hunting ban certified nonlead ammunition lists CDFW

If you’re hunting in California, you better start using lead-free ammo. Starting July 1, 2015, “certified” non-lead ammunition will be required when hunting on all California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) lands and for all Nelson bighorn sheep hunts anywhere in the state.

CDFW reminds hunters who plan to hunt bighorn sheep or at any CDFW wildlife area or ecological reserve to acquire nonlead ammunition. California’s bureaucrats also state: “Hunters are also encouraged to practice shooting nonlead ammunition to make sure firearms are sighted-in properly and shoot accurately with nonlead ammunition. Nonlead ammunition for some firearm calibers may be in short supply so hunters should plan accordingly.”

CLICK HERE for List of CDFW-Certified Nonlead Ammunition.

Why is lead-free ammo now required? Thank the California Legislature. In October 2013, Assembly Bill 711 was signed into law requiring the phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting anywhere in the state by July 1, 2019. This is the 2015 phase, which applies to CDFW lands and Bighorn sheep hunts. The restrictions will become tougher each year, with a complete ban going into effect in four years.

More information on the phase-out of lead ammunition for hunting in California can be found at: https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Hunting/Nonlead-Ammunition.

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June 29th, 2015

Applied Ballistics Tests 50+ Types of .22 LR Rimfire Ammo

.22 LR Rimfire Ammunition testing Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Eley
Photo shows Bryan Litz (on right) and tester Mitchell Fitzpatrick. Bryan said: “Only 2,445 rounds to go! We’re testing over 50 ammo types in five different twist barrels… science can be exhausting!”

Do you know the actual BC (Ballistic Coefficient) of your rimfire ammunition? Well Applied Ballisitics will soon have answers for you. Bryan Litz and his team of testers have been working on a Herculean project. They’ve been testing over fifty types of .22 LR ammo, using five different twist-rate barrels.

.22 LR Rimfire Ammunition testing Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Eley

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June 29th, 2015

Stangskyting — Amazing Bolt Action Rifle Speed Shooting

How fast can you shoot a bolt-action rifle? We doubt you can out-pace the ace “Stangskyting” shooters from Scandinavia. Some of these guys can run more than two rounds per second, including mag changes! That’s impressive. Bulletin reader C. Lemmermann from Denmark told us: “In Scandinavia we have this competition called ‘Stangskyting’. It’s similar to the ‘Mad Minute’ but we only have 25 seconds to hit the target [at] 200-300m distance with a 6.5×55 [target rifle].” In the Stangskyting video below a shooter named Børklop puts 16 rounds on target in just 25 seconds. (He starts with a round in the chamber and cycles through three, 5-round magazines). Børklop’s performance, with just a sling and iron sights, is impressive. He’s shooting a Sauer 200 STR target rifle with 5-round magazine. Note that Børklop manipulates the Sauer’s bolt with his thumb and index finger, while pulling the trigger with his middle finger. As good as Børklop is, some Stangskyting competitors are even better. Roy Arne Syversrud from Oslo, Norway tells us: “The best shooters in Norway can do 21 shots in 25 seconds, changing the mag three times.”

This Guy Could Break the “Mad Minute” Record
Børklop’s rate of fire, 16 rounds in 25 seconds, is the equivalent of 38.4 rounds in 60 seconds. That’s a notable number because the record for the “Mad Minute”, a British Army marksmanship drill, is 38 rounds in one minute. That record was set in 1914 by Sergeant Instructor Alfred Snoxall, and still stands. So as you watch Børklop, keep in mind that Snoxall shot that fast for a full minute with a Lee-Enfield nearly 100 years ago!

Børklop has an average cycling time of 1.56 seconds per shot, starting with a round in the chamber. To beat the record of 38 rounds, he would need to make seven mag changes in sixty seconds. All those mag swaps could reduce his average time per shot, making it difficult to achieve 38 hits in a minute. But, if Børklop could use 10-round mags with his Sauer STR, this guy has the skills to break the record.

Sauer 200 STR Target Rifle

To emphasize the capabilities of the WWI-era British shooter who set the record, Snoxall shot as fast as Børklop does, but Snoxall reloaded with stripper clips. Snoxall’s SMLE (Lee-Enfield) rifle also had relatively crude open sights and the stock was far less ergonomic than Børklop’s Sauer STR stock.

Here’s another Stanskyting video showing John O. Ågotnes shooting rapidfire with his Sauer 200 STR (Scandinavian Target Rifle) chambered in 6.5×55. By our count, Ågotnes manages 17 shots within the 25-second time period. That rate of fire (17 in 25 seconds) equates to 40.8 rounds in one minute!

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June 29th, 2015

Fine Furniture for Firearms — Sliding-Top Table Vault

gunsafe table furniture vault hidden storage

Here’s something that will teach unwanted guests some “table manners”. We’ve seen handguns hidden in books, and stowed behind faux baseboard vents, but this hand-crafted, slide-open table takes the cake. We doubt that anyone could sit down at this table and suspect that a shotgun, scoped rifle, two pistols and a knife were stored securely inside. There’s an arsenal hiding in there!

To access the guns under the sliding table-top, first you flip down a wood trap-door on the side. That exposes a key-lock which unlatches the interleaved left and right table segments. These slide open horizontally on metal tracks, exposing the full arsenal underneath. This “table vault” is a very clever design, built with fine craftsmanship.

gunsafe table furniture vault hidden storage

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June 28th, 2015

Cartridge Headspace — Understanding the Basics

Brownells Headspace Gauge cutaway chamber drawing SAAMI ANSI

Do you know what the inside of a rifle chamber (and throat zone) really looks like? Do you understand the concept of headspace and why it’s important? If not, you should read the Brownells GunTech article Gauging Success – Minimum Headspace and Maximum COL. This article explains the basics of headspace and shows how to measure headspace (and length to lands) in your barrels with precision. The article also explains how to adjust your full-length sizing dies to “bump the shoulder” as needed.

Why is headspace important? The article explains: “Controlling headspace and setting proper C.O.L. also represent improved safety and reduced cost of handloading. Excessive headspace can cause case head separation and gases in excess of 60,000 PSI escaping from a rifle’s chamber. Too little headspace can result in a chamber forced bullet crimp and a bullet that becomes an obstruction more than a properly secured projectile. Excessive C.O.L. can result in a rifling-bound bullet, a condition that could result in spikes of excessive pressure.” [Editor’s NOTE: It is common for competitive benchrest shooters to seat bullets into the rifling. This can be done safely if you reduce your loads accordingly. With some bullets we often see best accuracy .010″ (or more) into the lands. However, this can generate more pressure than the same bullet seated .010″ away from initial lands contact. As with all reloading, start low and work up gradually.]

Brownells Headspace Gauge cutaway chamber drawing SAAMI ANSI

How is headspace specified? Most cartridges used within the United States are defined within ANSI/SAAMI Z299.3-4. Brownells explains: “In the case of the .243 Winchester, as an example, there are pressure specifications, cartridge drawings and, as pictured above, chamber drawings. Armed with a chamber drawing, each manufacturer producing a firearm for the .243 Winchester knows the proper standard dimension to cut chambers and set headspace. Notice there are two headspace reference dimensions for the chamber. The upper is a place in the chamber where the shoulder is .400″ in diameter; the “datum” or “basic” line. The lower is the 1.630″~1.640″ minimum – maximum dimension from the breech face (bolt face) to that point in the chamber that measures .400″.”

The actual headspace of any firearm is the distance from the breech face to the point in the chamber that is intended to prevent forward motion of a cartridge.

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June 28th, 2015

Litz on Long-Range Shooting — Accuracy vs. Precision

Applied Ballistics Rounds on Target DVD accurateshooter.com

The NSSF has posted a video featuring Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics. Bryan also serves as Chief Ballistician for Berger Bullets and ABM Ammo. In this short video, Bryan explains the importance of ballistics for precision shooting at long range. Bryan covers key elements — drop, wind drift, angle correction and more. And Bryan also explains the key difference between Accuracy and Precision.

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June 28th, 2015

Excellent Video Covers Handgun Fundamentals

Pistol Fundamentals USAMU

If you shoot a pistol, you should watch this video. It covers the key fundamentals of handgun shooting: stance, arm position, grip, sight alignment, and trigger control. This excellent video features USAMU shooter SGT Shane Coley.

Arm/Elbow Position: You should not lock your elbows says SGT Coley: “Because my elbows are slightly bent, it allows the recoil to transfer into my shoulders, down my core, into my legs and to the ground, allowing me to maintain a flat-shooting gun … on multiple targets.”

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