May 24th, 2017

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56 PM II 2FP Scope Review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56mm PM II SFP Review
Test conducted by RifleShooter.com
For police and military use, the Schmidt & Bender PM II (Police Marksman) is the gold standard of extreme use rifle optics. Other high end scopes aspire to the PM II’s level of durability, optical clarity, repeatability, and performance. With our assistance, RifleShooter.com recently conducted an in-depth test of Schmidt & Bender’s 5-25×56 PM II, Second Focal Plane (SFP) version. Here are the results…

» READ FULL 5-25x56mm PM II Scope Review (LONGER VERSION)

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The test scope is a 5-25×56 PM II (SKU: 677-911-995-A8-A2) with a Second Focal Plane (SFP) P4FL2-MOA reticle; double-turn elevation with rotation indicator; single turn windage; 1/4-MOA click values; illuminated reticle; and side adjustable parallax from 10 meters to infinity. This is an impressive beast — a big, sturdy, well-made optic.

Schmidt & Bender scopes have sophisticated features and a wide array of available options. The many options and features of the 5-26x56mm PM II are explained in this Schmidt & Bender video:

Second Focal Plane (SFP) Reticles
The Second Focal Plane (SFP) reticle design works well for long-range target shooters, benchrest shooters, hunters, and law enforcement. Often, SFP reticles are associated with Minute of Angle/MOA-based reticles. For target shooters who like to dial-in the elevation corrections, frequently SFP is the preferred reticle type. Also, these reticles are offered with thinner lines and markings to aid in target shooting, by not covering up as much of the target area, which is absolutely necessary in such cases as F-Class and Benchrest shooting. With a SFP reticle the size/width of the reticle lines stay constant at all magnifications.

Tall Target and Box Tests

Commentary by Rifleshooter.com Editor
To get an idea of how the PM II tracked I wanted to conduct a tall target and box test. I set up a couple of ISPC targets at 100 yards (below).

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The target on the left is for the tall ladder test, the target at the right is for the box test.

With the scope zeroed* I set up a tall target test at 100 yards. I placed a 1″ orange dot on a pair of targets (above, left). We then used a four foot level to draw a plum line moving up from the dot and fired the three shot group below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

I dialed 30 MOA of elevation on the scope and fired another group. Measuring the distance between the two groups, would indicate how well the scope is tracking.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Since 1 MOA is 1.047″ at 100 yards, 30 MOA would be 31.41″ (30 x 1.047″ = 31.41″), looking at my tape measure, everything checked out (above).

Next I conducted a quick box test and set up an IPSC target with a orange paster at 100 yards. To do this I first Fired one round with the scope zeroed, then…

Dialed 6 MOA left, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA up, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA down, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA left and fired one round

After this, you want to see two holes close to each other on the first target, as well as the correct spacing dialed in between each hole, so how did the PM II do?

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Well, it worked like a champ! The rest of my time with the PM II has been equally impressive.

SUMMARY — Our Assessment of the 5-25×56 PM II

Here are our key conclusions from testing the Schmidt & Bender PM II 5-25×56 SFP:

— It’s a lot of scope. The PM II is pretty much the best scope you’ll be able to buy anywhere in the world. There is a reason they are in such widespread Military and Law Enforcement use, it has earned its reputation.

— Great zero stop. The PM II has the easiest-to-adjust turret and zero stop system I have ever used. On the PM II, Schmidt & Bender’s exclusive “Sub Zero Stop” system allows movement below zero. On the test scope it was 1.75 MOA. This is a great feature if you switch ammunition or elevation and need to bump your zero down.

— Tracks well. This was to be expected with its widespread use by military units throughout the world.

— Crisp, precise adjustments. The tactile feel of the knobs is exceptional.

— Crystal clear glass. Great light transmission and reticle.

This Schmidt & Bender catalog page shows reticle options for the 5-25×56 PM II:

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review
Click image to zoom

Turrets and Controls — How They Work

On the right side of the optic, you’ll notice a .250 MOA single-turn windage adjustment knob. On the top you’ll note the .250 MOA elevation adjustments. The tactile feel of each “click” is impressive — crisp and precise. A large parallax knob is located on the left side of the turret. The smaller knob located closer to the eyepiece is the adjustment knob for the illuminated reticle.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Here the view from behind the scope. Note the DT (double turn) elevation turret. At its current setting in the photo above, it is still on the first revolution (.250 MOA below 0) and as adjustments within the first revolution are made, you’d read the white numbers. During the second revolution, the windows in the top of the turret turn yellow, as shown below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Test Rifle — .300 Win Mag in Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
For testing and evaluation purposes I mounted the PM II in Spuhr ISMS mount on a custom made .300 Winchester Magnum rifle. Testing was done with handloaded ammo: Sierra’s 195-grain Tipped MatchKings over Norma brass and Hodgdon H4831SC powder.

This is the test rifle I used. It was built primarily with parts from Brownells.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

  • Stiller action
  • Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
  • Shilen Select Match barrel, #7 1:10″ twist
  • Badger Ordnance FTE brake
  • Spuhr ISMS mount
  • Jewel HVR trigger
  • Aimpoint T1 micro sight
  • Sierra 7 bipod
  • Here is the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56mm PM II SFP (foreground) alongside three other S&B products:
    5-25×56 PM II FFP (Desert Tan), 12-50×56 PM II, 3-20×50 PM II

    Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

    Better Pricing, Better Warranty, Better Availabilty
    In addition to increased production and availability, Schmidt and Bender has reduced retail pricing on PMII models 14-19% depending on the model. S&B Marketing Director Kyle Brown commented, “S&B improved its warranty in the USA for 2017, and now offers a USA 20-Year Transferable Limited Warranty. We have reduced our pricing to be competitive; and have greatly increased our on-hand inventory levels to supply our customers with complete and on-time deliveries.”

    Schmidt & Bender has made an effort to support the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brown said “for 2017 we have made a very hard push to become more active in PRS with our brand and with our products.”.

    To learn more about Schmidt & Bender optics, CLICK HERE.


    * Zeroing Process for PM II: The zero stop and turret settings are controlled by set screws. Zeroing is a breeze. You don’t have to move caps, insert shims, move clutch mechanisms, and so on. Simply loosen the screws, swing the turret back to “0” and you are all set. To establish a 100-yard zero, I hung a target at 50 yards, fired one round, dialed a correction, fired a confirmation shot and moved back to 100 yards. I fired one round at 100, made a correction and was zeroed. That’s it, three rounds, done.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 2 Comments »
    May 24th, 2017

    Optimize Neck Tension with Bushings, Expanders, and Annealing

    Case Loading Neck Tension Sierra Bullets Paul Box

    by Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Paul Box
    One thing that plays a major role in building an accuracy load is neck tension. I think a lot of reloaders pretty much take this for granted and don’t give that enough thought.

    So, how much neck tension is enough?

    Thru the years and shooting both a wide variety of calibers and burn rates of powder, I’ve had the best accuracy overall with .002″ of neck tension. Naturally you will run into a rifle now and then that will do its best with something different like .001″ or even .003″, but .002″ has worked very well for me. So how do we control the neck tension? Let’s take a look at that.

    First of all, if you’re running a standard sizing die with an expander ball, just pull your decapping rod assembly out of your die and measure the expander ball. What I prefer is to have an expander ball that is .003″ smaller than bullet diameter. So for example in a .224 caliber, run an expander ball of .221″. This allows for .001″ spring back in in your brass after sizing, and still gives you .002″ in neck tension. If you want to take the expander ball down in diameter, just chuck up your decapping rod assembly in a drill and turn it down with some emery cloth. When you have the diameter you need, polish it with three ought or four ought steel wool. This will give it a mirror finish and less drag coming through your case neck after sizing.

    Tips for Dies With Interchangeable Neck Bushings
    If you’re using a bushing die, I measure across the neck of eight or ten loaded rounds, then take an average on these and go .003″ under that measurement. There are other methods to determine bushing size, but this system has worked well for me.

    Case Loading Neck Tension Sierra Bullets Paul Box

    Proper Annealing Can Deliver More Uniform Neck Tension
    Another thing I want to mention is annealing. When brass is the correct softness, it will take a “set” coming out of the sizing die far better than brass that has become to hard. When brass has been work hardened to a point, it will be more springy when it comes out of a sizing die and neck tension will vary. Have you ever noticed how some bullets seated harder than others? That is why.

    Case Loading Neck Tension Sierra Bullets Paul Box

    Paying closer attention to neck tension will give you both better accuracy and more consistent groups.

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading Post comment »
    May 23rd, 2017

    MPA Chassis Finds Favor with PRS and Tactical Competitors

    MasterPiece Arms MPA BA tactical PRS Comp Competition Chassis

    According to a Precision Rifle Blog survey, the MasterPiece Arms (MPA) chassis system is the second most popular stock in the PRS game, and it’s gaining ground fast. MPA was second only to Manners Stocks in popularity among the top 100 PRS shooters. Remarkably, the MPA chassis experienced a nine-fold increase in use in 2016 over the previous year. This thing is really catching on.

    MasterPiece Arms MPA BA tactical PRS Comp Competition Chassis

    Here MPA President Phil Cashin Shows How to Set Up the MPA BA Chassis:

    2015 PRS Champion David Preston (who is currently ranked #1 in Precision Rifle Series standings) favors MPA Chassis systems: “I chose the MPA BA Chassis because of its adjustability, versatility, and company’s willingness to adapt to shooters needs and suggestions. It’s the most comfortable and reliable stock on the market.”

    MasterPiece Arms MPA BA tactical PRS Comp Competition Chassis

    One reason the MPA Chassis works so well is that MPA’s president, Phil Cashin, is an active PRS shooter who regularly tests out features in competition. He also gets feedback from other PRS competitors: “We’re always implementing feedback and suggestions from shooters into our products. In fact, the idea for our EVG grip, which has a rest on it to better support your trigger finger, came directly from a suggestion that David Preston, 2015 PRS Champion, gave me at a match.”

    New MPA BA Competition Chassis

    The “latest and greatest” MPA stock system is the MPA BA Competition Chassis. This offers the best features of the original MPA BA Chassis system plus some new, notable enhancements. With the elimination of the monopod, weight is reduced. A movable barricade stop comes standard. The buttstock offers full adjustability for length-of-pull, cheek height, and buttpad height/cant.

    MasterPiece Arms MPA BA tactical PRS Comp Competition Chassis

    Rotating, Multi-Position Barricade Stop — Aids stability when shooting on a variety of barricades.
    Trinity Rail System — Allows closer bipod when shooting off oil drums or similar props.
    Modified Magazine Well — This “Ryan Castle” magwell allows fast side-loading of mags into chassis.
    Rear Bag-rider Attachment — Improves tracking/stability in rear sandbag.

    MPA Production Class Rifle with Savage Action

    Along with its chassis systems, MPA offers a complete rifle for the PRS Production Division:

    Masterpiece arms MPA Production Rifle PRS MPA PCR Savage BA Lite

    To fit PRS Production Class Rules (PCR), MPA has developed the new $1999.99 BA Lite PCR Competition Rifle built around a Savage Model 12 short action. The Savage action is upgraded with a Rifle Basix 2-lb trigger, and the adjustable, MPA BA Lite Chassis offers a bag rider, barricade stop, and even a built-in bubble level. Bipods can be attached up front to a rail, with optional spigot mount. MPA PCR Rifles come with stainless Bergara barrels, 22-26 inches in length, fitted with MPA muzzle brakes. Chamberings offered are: 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6-6.5×47 Lapua, 6.5×47 Lapua, .243 Win, and .308 Win. The PCR rifle includes a 10-round AICS-type magazine.

    Permalink Competition, Tactical Post comment »
    May 23rd, 2017

    Tuning Tips — Pressure, Powder Fouling, and Temperature

    Pressure Temperature Fouling Tech Tips Tommy Todd Sierra Bullets

    by Tommy Todd, Sierra Bullets Chief Ballistician for Sierra Bullets Blog
    I have shot several disciplines of shooting competitions over the years and have learned a few things regarding ammunition and bullet function during this time. Frequently the matches I shoot require 40 to 100 shots before a person gets a chance to clean his rifle. Just as frequently, a good shooting match rifle will still shoot very good scores and groups with that many rounds fired through them. However, those guns do not deliver the same accuracy as when they were clean, but the drop-off in accuracy is not a huge change unless a set of accumulative issues arise.

    In one situation, very dirty powder created more serious problems…

    Pressure Issues — Extraction Problems Caused by Bad Fouling

    Problem: Pressures Increased as Powder Fouled Barrel and Carbon Ring Formed
    Solution: Clean Barrel Every Ten Rounds.

    I witnessed a set of problems that occurred with a fellow competitor’s rifle at a recent F-Class match. He was using a large case capacity cartridge for the bore diameter and he was shooting a powder that was burning extremely dirty. As the match progressed, the carbon buildup caused most likely a carbon ring in the throat of the rifle and pressures kept increasing to the point that the cases were hard to extract, bolt lift was excessive, and eventually he quit shooting the rifle due to these issues. Accuracy also suffered as could be evidenced by the gun’s performance on target. This load looked fine when he was developing it, none of the excessive pressure signs appeared when he worked the load up, but he was cleaning the gun every ten shots.

    When he was shooting multiple, 20-shot strings during the match is when the issues appeared. He was able to give the gun a thorough cleaning and the issues went away, for several rounds and then the pressures started appearing again. These pressure signs were not due to ambient temperatures as it was a cool spring morning and the temperature was in the low 40° range.

    Accuracy Issues — Tune Lost with Higher Ambient Temps

    Problem: Accuracy Lost When Outside Temp Much Hotter than When Load Developed
    Solution: Pull Bullets, Reload Ammo with Lighter Charge

    A couple of years ago, I attended a match early in the shooting season and it was unusually hot for that time period. I heard a competitor worrying before the match about his gun “blowing up”. At first I was concerned, but after thinking about what he had said I realized that he meant his “accuracy” blowing up, meaning he knowingly had loaded his ammunition at the top end of an accuracy tune that he established via a ladder test. The next day I asked him how his scores were and he said the gun was not shooting very well initially, but he had found enough equipment from friends that were at the match and had pulled the bullets, reduced the powder charge by a few tenths of a grain and re-seated the bullets and his gun was now shooting normally. The temperature difference between his home range the weekend before when he established his load and the match conditions was about 30 degrees and that was enough to cause an accuracy change at 1000 yards.

    Ammo cool storage

    Bosch Insulated tool caseTo learn more about how ambient temperature (and primer choice) affect pressures (and hence velocities) you should read the article Pressure Factors: How Temperature, Powder, and Primer Affect Pressure by Denton Bramwell. In that article, the author uses a pressure trace instrument to analyze how temperature affects ammo performance. Bramwell’s tests yielded some fascinating results.

    For example, barrel temperature was a key factor: “Both barrel temperature and powder temperature are important variables, and they are not the same variable. If you fail to take barrel temperature into account while doing pressure testing, your test results will be very significantly affected. The effect of barrel temperature is around 204 PSI per F° for the Varget load. If you’re not controlling barrel temperature, you about as well might not bother controlling powder temperature, either. In the cases investigated, barrel temperature is a much stronger variable than powder temperature.”

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading Post comment »
    May 23rd, 2017

    Precision Acrylic Loading Blocks from Bullets.com

    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    High-quality loading blocks precisely sized for your cartridge types make the reloading process easier. Bullets.com now offers acrylic loading blocks that set new standards for this kind of product. Precision CNC-machined from solid acrylic, these beautiful loading blocks were designed by a member of the U.S. Shooting Team. Dimensions are ultra-precise and these blocks even have a primer recess in each hole so the cases sit perfectly. You can order blocks for a variety of rifle cartridge types: .223 Rem Family, .308 Win Family, .308 Tall (.30-06), RSAUM and WSM Magnum, Magnum Tall, .338 LM Family, .50 BMG. In addition, there are blocks for most popular pistol cartridges: .380/9mm, .38 SPL, .38 Super, .40 SW, .44 Magnum, .45 ACP. These blocks are affordable, starting at just $10.95. The popular .308 Win Family blocks are $11.95.

    Click photo to view full-screen image:
    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    Tech Insight — Acrylic Machining Process
    The folks at Bullets.com tell us that machining acrylic is not as easy as it seems. Making precision blocks is a multi-stage process involving special equipment. Solid slabs are first machined flat so they are parallel. Then several custom cutters are used to craft precisely-arranged holes with nice chamfers on each hole as well as the outside edge. Every hole bottom has a milled, secondary primer pocket so the primers don’t contact the bottoms. The see-through blocks are finished to a nice sheen.

    Permalink Gear Review, Reloading Post comment »
    May 22nd, 2017

    Kevin Nevius — Smallbore Champion and Master Rifle-Builder

    On the Shooting Sports USA website, there’s a great profile of Kevin Nevius, one of America’s leading competitive marksmen. Kevin is best known for his smallbore success but he has also an impressive record in long-range centerfire competition — In 2005 and 2006 he won the Sierra Trophy at Camp Perry in 1000-yard competition. This was followed by smallbore National Championships in 2008, 2010, and 2014. This story, penned by gunwriter Hap Rocketto, covers Kevin’s career, which has included multiple championships and many records.

    “My brother got me into long range varmint hunting and I started building my own guns very early,” Nevius told Dan Holmes in a Pronematch.com interview. “I had a hunting friend who shot indoor smallbore who started me in three position and I was hooked.”

    » READ Kevin Nevius Profile in Shooting Sports USA

    Here are highlights from Hap Rocketto’s Profile of Kevin Nevius:

    Shooting Sports USAChampion shooter Kevin Nevius grew up in a household that did not allow firearms, an unlikely beginning for one of the United States’ premier prone rifleman and gunsmiths. Once out on his own he fell in with his brother who enjoyed long-range varmint hunting. His natural bent for things mechanical (he is a professional structural engineer) soon had him tinkering with rifles, which eventually led him to building his own.

    Everything fell into line for him in smallbore during the 2008 season. After shooting a series of training matches in which he was most successful, he arrived at Camp Perry at the peak of performance and won his first National Smallbore Rifle Conventional Prone Championship. Kevin came back strong in 2010, winning the inaugural individual National Smallbore Rifle Metric Prone Championship, as well as the team title at Bristol, IN. [Kevin then won the Smallbore Conventional Prone Championship in 2014 with a practically perfect score of 4799-390X (LINK).]

    Along the way, Nevius has won some impressive national records. In conventional competition he co-holds the 1200-shot metallic sight aggregate record of 1200-102X. He was just one shot short of perfection in the 480 aggregate, where he holds the civilian record of 4799-412X, just one point behind, and 11 Xs ahead of, Joe Hein’s 4800-401X open record.

    Kevin Nevius hopes to build a smallbore rig capable of 3/8-MOA at 100 yards.
    Kevin Nevius smallbore gunsmith

    Building the Ultimate Rimfire Prone Rifle
    Kevin is not just a great trigger-puller. He also smiths his own rifles. His current goal as a gunsmith is to build a rimfire rifle that will shoot 3/8″ groups at 100 yards. That’s a big challenge — 3/8-MOA represents very good accuracy for a centerfire rifle with handloaded ammo. But if any rimfire smith can build a rifle that will shoot that well at 100, it’s probably Kevin.

    Permalink - Articles, Competition 1 Comment »
    May 22nd, 2017

    Bargain Finder 87: AccurateShooter’s Deals of the Week

    Accurateshooter Bargain Finder Deals of Week

    At the request of our readers, we provide select “Deals of the Week”. Every Monday morning we offer our Best Bargain selections. Here are some of the best deals on firearms, hardware, reloading components, and shooting accessories. Be aware that sale prices are subject to change, and once clearance inventory is sold, it’s gone for good. You snooze you lose.

    1. Brownells — Rock Chucker Supreme Reloading Kit, $199.99

    Deals of Week RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Kit

    Everything you see above can be yours for just $199.99, after manufacturer’s rebate. Right now, Brownells is selling the Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit for $269.99. That’s a great deal considering all the hardware you get. Heck, the Rock Chucker press alone is worth $150.00+. Next, you can save $20.00 and get Free Shipping with Brownells CODE M3T. (We confirmed that code works on 5/20/17). So the Brownells delivered price is $249.99 (using Code M3T). But here’s the real incentive — this Rock Chucker Supreme Kit qualifies for a Buck$ or Bullets Rebate — choose either $50 or 500 Speer bullets. If you take the fifty bucks ($50), that reduces your net cost to just $199.99 for the entire RCBS Reloading Kit. That’s a total steal.

    Deals of Week RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Kit

    2. EuroOptic — Vortex Viper 6-24x50mm PST FFP, $799.00

    Eurooptic Vortex Viper FFP EBR First Focal tactical Scope Sale

    Here’s a “killer deal” if you need a high-quality scope for PRS and tactical games. This Vortex Viper PST 6-24x50mm scope features an illuminated EBR-2C reticle with Mil-based hash marks. The tactical-style turrets have 0.1 Mil clicks with zero-stop. The 6X low-end magnification is wide enough for closer targets, while the 24X top end is plenty of magnification for long range. The 23 oz. scope, which features a rugged, 30mm one-piece main tube, carries Vortex’s full warranty. Note this is a First Focal Plane (FFP) scope. You can save hundreds with this deal — this optic sells elsewhere for up to $1049.00. NOTE: This item is showing “back-order”, but EuroOptic.com is expecting a big shipment this week — so place your orders now.

    3. Amazon — Plano Double Rifle Case with Wheels, $114.92

    Plano double scoped rifle case with wheels

    This Plano Double Scoped Rifle Case is an Amazon Best Seller for good reason. It offers the functionality and durability of an SKB-type hard case for HALF the money. This is under $115.00, while the equivalent SKB is around $240.00, so you can buy two Planos for the price of one SKB. The 51.5″ interior will fit most scoped competition rifles up to about 29″ barrels (measure your own rifle to make sure). The handles are convenient and beefy and the wheels make this case easy to move through airports and parking lots. This is a very tough, roomy case for the money. Plus Amazon is offering FREE Shipping.

    4. Amazon — Steiner AX830 8x30mm Binoculars, $126.30

    Steiner AZ830 binoculars 8x30 Military Marine sale Amazon $114.49

    Need a good set of rugged, affordable binoculars for hunting or varmint work? Then check out the Steiner AZ830 at $126.30. These are essentially identical to the respected Steiner Military Marine binoculars which sell for $220 or more. The only differences are the color and the packaging. The AZ830s are a black “house brand” created for Amazon by Steiner. Other than the color (black vs. OD Green) everything is the same. Same bright glass, same auto focus system, some tough rubber armor, same rock solid Steiner Heritage Warranty. We highly recommend these AZ830 binoculars. For under $130.00, you can’t beat them.

    Editor’s Note: With these AZ830 Steiner binoculars, once you adjust the eyepieces, everything from 20 yards to infinity is in focus. This is a huge advantage in the field. I own the virtually identical Steiner 8×30 Military Marine model which has the same focus system.

    5. Aero Precision — Upper & Lower Kit, FDE Cerakote, $193.49

    AR AR16 Upper and Lower Aero Precision Kit

    Thinking of putting together an accurate AR for the new PRS Gas Gun series (or 3-Gun matches)? Here’s a good place to start. Aero Precision now offers a $193.49 kit with stripped Upper and Lower Receivers — both with a durable Flat Dark Earth (Magpul FDE) Cerakote finish. Just add barrel, buttstock, trigger group, controls, and your bolt carrier group. Note: This Kit will work with the .223 Rem and similar-length, larger-caliber cartridges such as the 6mmAR and 6.5 Grendel. If you want to shoot a 6.5 Creedmoor, you’ll need an AR10 platform rifle.

    6. Midsouth — Hornady LnL Auto Charge Scale/Dispenser, $159.99

    Hornady Lock and load auto charge scale powder dispenser sale discount

    The Hornady Lock N Load Auto Charge Electronic Scale/Dispenser is now on sale for just $159.99 at Midsouth Shooters Supply, discounted way down from the regular $226.24 price. That’s the lowest price we’ve seen on this product in a long time, making this a real bargain. If you are looking for an affordable, combo digital scale and powder dispenser, this is a great deal. By comparison, the new RCBS ChargeMaster Lite sells for around $250.00 and is back-ordered at many vendors. That means you can save at least $90.00 by buying RED instead of GREEN.

    7. CDNN — Remington RP9 9x19mm Pistol, $249.99 with Rebate

    Remington RP9 9mm pistol handgun service Rebate sale discount

    Here’s a killer deal on a modern, full-size, 9mm pistol. The striker-fired Remington RP9 is similar to Smith & Wesson’s popular M&P9, but we prefer the Remington’s grip ergonomics, and the RP9 is much less expensive. The RP9 comes with three (3) grip inserts and two (2) 18-round magazines. CDNN’s retail price is $299.99, but this pistol qualifies for a $50 mail-in Rebate from Remington. That knocks your net cost down to $249.99. That’s a heck of a bargain for a nicely-designed, American-made pistol. We’ve shot this Remington RP9 pistol and definitely prefer its ergonomics/controls over those of the full-size 9mm Glock 17.

    8. Bass Pro — Federal Value Pack .22 LR, 325 Rds for $19.99

    Federal .22 LR Rimfire Ammo ammunition auto-match Target Grade bulk pack

    This Federal Auto-Match .22 LR ammo is just 6.2 cents per round — the kind of pricing on bulk rimfire ammo we used to see in the “good old days”. Act quickly, this $19.99 Federal .22 LR Ammo deal at Bass Pro Shops won’t last long. Each box contains 325 rounds — enough ammo for many sessions at the range. The bullets are 40 grains, solid lead.

    9. Home Depot — 72″ Wood Workbench for $75.36

    Folding Wood Work Bench Home Deport Reloading

    This patented Home Depot workbench assembles in a few minutes. Simply unfold the legs, pop in the shelf, and you are ready to start your project. Made from Premium 2×4 Hemlock fastened with glue and screws, this workbench is a great value. The bench (72″ wide x 35″ high x 22″ deep) can easily be stored when not in use. NOTE: The wood is unfinished (can be painted or stained).

    Permalink Hot Deals, Optics, Reloading 1 Comment »
    May 22nd, 2017

    Accurate Cartridges — The .284 Shehane, an Improved .284 Win

    F-Class Reloading .284 Winchester Win Shehane Accuracy

    If you look at that 5-round group you might think it was shot with a 6 PPC or maybe a 6mmBR. But no, this was done with heavy 180gr Berger Hybrid bullets and the .284 Shehane, an improved version of the .284 Winchester. In fact, this impressive sub-quarter MOA group was shot while fire-forming with a very well-worn barrel!

    Gun builder Ryan Pierce of Piercision Rifles explains:

    Here’s a 5-shot 0.191″ group at 100 yards with my .284 Shehane fireforming loads. This barrel has 2200 rounds through it. It had 2000 as a straight .284 Win and then I set it back to .284 Shehane to form brass with. This was the first five rounds through it after I cleaned it after the last match. [The load was] 180 Hybrids with 54.0 grains of H4831 SC.

    Ya, I figured why not I had some old barrels laying around so I just chopped 2″ off the back and 1″ off the front and chambered it up as a Shehane. Had 1000 pieces to fireform and didn’t want to do all that on a brand new barrel.

    My fireform loads are going 2765 FPS. I have a 29″ barrel also though since it’s a setback. Once you get it formed I would push it faster than that or I wouldn’t even bother with the Shehane. My old straight .284 load at 2890 fps had ES spread in single digits for 10 shots. I figured if I get it up to 2935-2950 fps that will be a point or two saved in a several day match.

    .284 Winchester Shehane Reamer Print PT&G

    Fellow .284 Shehane shooter Erik Cortina notes that the .284 Shehane has a velocity edge over the straight .284 Win because it holds more powder: “The Shehane has more capacity than the .284 Winchester. Ryan is using 54.0 grains simply as a fire-forming load. Typical load for a Shehane is around 57.0 grains of Hodgdon H4831 SC.” By blowing the sidewalls out 0.010″, the .284 Shehane picks up about 3.3 grains of extra case capacity. That enhancement makes a BIG difference. The extra boiler room is enough to drive the 180s at 2900-2950 fps with H4831sc, with long barrels.

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, Reloading Post comment »
    May 21st, 2017

    Electronic Targets Impress Competitors at CMP Eastern Games

    CMP eastern games creedmoor cup electronic targets

    The CMP Eastern Games were a huge success, thanks in no small part to the mobile electronic target system. The event, which drew 360+ competitors, took place April 28 – May 2 at Camp Butner in North Carolina*. The Kongsberg electronic targets allowed the CMP to run relays more efficiently, and the targets eliminate the need for competitors to do pit duty. GSM Matches, which typically run four relays each day, saw days with a total of nine and 10 relays during its scheduled times, while the Vintage Sniper and other matches finished in record time.

    “The electronic targets are phenomenal,” said brothers Richard and Jonathan Mast, who attended the Eastern Games along with other family members. Jonathan added, “It was the best shooting experience I’ve ever seen as far as immediately finding out where you’re shooting – best I’ve ever had.”

    CMP eastern games creedmoor cup electronic targets

    Throughout the event at Camp Butner, competitors had the opportunity to fire on CMP’s mobile electronic highpower target range. The Kongsberg targets contain internal microphones that locate shot position. The scores are instantly calculated by computer and then wirelessly transmitted to portable, tablet monitors on each firing point.

    CMP eastern games creedmoor cup electronic targets

    The new targets were well received. Competitors observed that the targets simplify the process for the shooter and provide immediate feedback and scoring. Shooter Caleb Mast noted: “This makes it easier for people who don’t have equipment, like a scope, to get in. All you pay is the registration fee, and I just brought what I’m wearing and was still able to score well enough to get my feedback on the monitor.”

    CMP eastern games creedmoor cup electronic targets

    *The Eastern Games ran April 28 through May 2, 2017. The Creedmoor Cup Marches were held May 3-7, 2017, following the Eastern Games. SEE Match Schedule.

    Permalink Competition, News 3 Comments »
    May 21st, 2017

    Review Shooting Fundamentals with Ryan Cleckner Video

    Still Tac30 action tactical rifle Ryan Cleckner book
    Photo by Forum member GAT. Chambered in 6-6.5×47 Lapua, this rifle features a Stiller TAC30 action, Krieger barrel, Harrells brake, Konohawk Stock, and Sightron SIII 6-24x50mm scope.

    Ryan Cleckner has created many good shooting videos for the NSSF, such as his excellent Understanding MOA Video. Ryan is noted for his ability to explain complex topics in an easy-to-comprehend manner. This video, covering the fundamentals of shooting, has been viewed over 1.6 million times. It’s worth watching, particularly for guys getting started in PRS/practical competitions.

    In this video, Ryan Cleckner reviews proper technique for rifle shooters. A stable platform, sight alignment, sight picture, and trigger control are key fundamentals to shooting properly. This is basic stuff, but Cleckner presents it in a clear, logical fashion. This is a good video for novice shooters.

    Tip on Viewing Your Reticle:
    Cleckner: “Sometimes it can be difficult to focus between the target and the reticle, even with the parallax adjusted properly. I recommend you focus only on the reticle. Just like the front sight on a rifle or a handgun, that reticle is what you can control, and it’s what matters. Focus on a crisp, clear reticle, in a stable platform, and all that’s left is trigger control.”

    Tip on Trigger Control:
    Cleckner: “Trigger control is pretty straightforward, as long as you think about it as a continuous process, and not just one thing that happens. I like to think about it as drawing a line in the dirt. I like to think about this constant pressure that I’m adding as I draw this line straight back, and then… continuing to draw that line even as the rifle goes off. That’s the good follow-through you’ll need.”

    Long Range Shooting Handbook — A Good Resource
    Cleckner has authored a book, the Long Range Shooting Handbook, which expands on the topics covered in the above video. You can view Sample Chapters from Ryan’s Book on Amazon.com.

    Ryan Cleckner’s new book is designed as an intro to important fundamental concepts such as MOA vs. Mils, External Ballistics, and Environmental Effects. Included are personal tips and advice based on Cleckner’s years of experience as a sniper instructor and special operations sniper.

    The Long Range Shooting Handbook is divided into three main categories: What It Is/How It Works, Fundamentals, and How to Use It. “What It Is/How It Works” covers equipment, terminology, and basic principles. “Fundamentals” covers the theory of long range shooting. “How to Use It” gives practical advice on implementing what you’ve learned, so you can progress as a skilled, long range shooter.

    As a long-range shooting expert, Ryan Cleckner has impressive credentials. Cleckner was a special operations sniper (1/75 RGR) with multiple combat deployments, and he has served a U.S. Army sniper instructor. Currently he works as a firearms industry executive and attorney.

    Permalink - Videos, Shooting Skills, Tactical Post comment »
    May 21st, 2017

    Cartridge Comparison Guide is Great Resource

    Cartridge Comparison Guide

    Cartridge Comparison GuideA unique, comprehensive Cartridge Comparison Guide is available as a 340-page, spiral-bound book. Covering over 250 cartridges, the updated Second Edition of the Cartridge Comparision Guide is the product of many years of labor by Andrew Chamberlain, a Utah-based hunter. Andrew says his $36.95 Guide “compares every factory available cartridge from the 17 calibers up to the 50 caliber cartridges”. (Sorry, most wildcat cartridges are not covered.) Chamberlain’s Guide also compiles cartridge data from major ammunition manufacturers such as Barnes, Federal, Hornady, Norma, Nosler, Remington, Sierra, Swift, Weatherby, and Winchester. It shows the optimal velocity achieved for each bullet weight and calculates bullet energy, recoil, and powder efficiency. Large color photos illustrate handgun and rifle cartridges.

    The Cartridge Comparison Guide provides data for thousands of cartridge/bullet/velocity combos. Quick reference data sheets and ballistics charts cover Trajectory, Velocity, and Energy out to 500 yards. The Cartridge Comparison Guide also offers a firearms lexicon, plus Appendices covering Cartridge Selection for Game Animals, Bullet Selection/Design, Bullet Expansion, Wound Channel Characteristics and more.

    New Content in Second Edition of Cartridge Comparison Guide
    The Cartridge Comparison Guide (Second Edition) costs $36.95 plus shipping and tax. CLICK HERE to visit the Online Store where you can order the 340-page book. Here’s what’s new in the Second Edition:

    • Addition of Shotgun Ammunition (Both Slug and Shot loads).
    • Momentum Calculation for all Rifle, Shotgun and Handgun loads.
    • Integration of Shotgun Slug Ammunition with Center Fire Rifle Data Tables.
    • Factory Load Summary Added (Shows manufacturers and loads produced).
    • One factory load and one hand load for every bullet weight available in each cartridge.
    • Over 90 pages of additional ballistics content (roughly 35% more than in First Edition).

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hunting/Varminting Post comment »
    May 20th, 2017

    How to Prematurely Kill a Barrel — .243 Win Fast Firing Test

    barrel life test rapid fire cooling

    Can sustained rapid-fire shooting with no cool-down period wear out a quality barrel more quickly? The answer is “Yes” according to Forum member LCazador, who did an interesting comparison test with two .243 Winchester barrels. He started off with two, identical, match-grade HV taper stainless barrels. Both were NEW at the start of testing, and LCazador shot the same load through each: 95gr match bullets with 38 grains of Hodgdon Varget. After giving both barrels the same, gentle 20-round break-in, 300 rounds were then fired through each barrel — in very different ways. Barrel condition and wear were monitored with a borescope.

    Barrel One — Slow Fire, Cool Down Periods, Cleaning Every 50 Rounds
    At the end of the 300-round test, Barrel One looked brand new. There was none of the severe fire cracking found in Barrel Two. This barrel was shot no more than 10 times without a cool down and firing was done at a much slower pace. Cleaning for this barrel was done every 50 shots.

    Barrel Two — Fast Firing, No Waiting, Cleaning Every 100 Rounds
    The second barrel, which received hard use and minimal cleaning, was severely damaged with severe fire cracking at the leade and throat. As a result, the barrel had to be re-chambered. This barrel was shot 100 rounds at time without cleaning and was shot up to 20 times in succession without a cool down.

    LESSON LEARNED — Heat Kills Barrel Life
    Don’t let your barrel get too hot, and keep it clean. One afternoon can ruin a barrel!

    Hawkeye Borescope imageMonitoring Barrel Wear with Borescope
    Some folks worry too much about what their borescopes reveal — many barrels do not have to be “squeaky clean” to perform well. In fact some barrels run better after ten or more fouling shots. However, a borescope can be very helpful when your barrel starts losing accuracy for no apparent reason. Forum member FdShuster writes:

    “A borescope is a positive way of backing up your suspicions when the rifle starts to throw an occasional (soon followed by more frequent) wild shot. Using the scope is also an excellent way to determine that the cause is barrel wear and not simply a need for a concentrated cleaning session to remove built up copper and more importantly, carbon fouling.

    I’ve had a few barrels that gave every indication of being shot out. But I ‘scoped them out and found the cause to be nothing more than requiring a good cleaning. They then returned to their usual performance. There’s no guessing involved when you are able to get ‘up close and personal’ using the scope. The borescope also provides an excellent view of the all-important condition of the crown. My borescope is one of the most valuable investments I’ve ever made.”

    Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
    May 20th, 2017

    Short-Range Benchrest Game Captured on Video

    We know that many of our readers have never personally participated in a short-range (100/200 yard) benchrest match. That’s understandable — moving backers are required in registered 100/200 benchrest (for group) matches, yet only a small percentage of ranges have that equipment. If you’re curious about the “point-blank” benchrest game, but haven’t had the chance to see it first-hand, check out this video created by youtuber “Taofledermaus”. On his YouTube Channel, you’ll find many other interesting shooting videos, including slow-motion target impact clips. This video shows the LV and HV guns, the flags, the gun-handling, the reloading set-ups, and of course, tiny little groups on targets.

    Registered 100/200 Benchrest Match

    Viewer Comments on the Video:

    “There is a lot more to this game than just pulling the trigger. Record targets are 5-shot groups, 5 averaged together for an Aggregate. Most times the winning Agg is under .250″ for 25 shots at 100 yards. Rifles weigh 10.5 pounds for LV class. Used rifles can be had for about $1500. Then add in another $1000 for rest, bags, loading tools, bullets, powder, not to mention windflags.” — Vmhtr

    “Benchrest shooting is sort of an ‘academy of shooting’. Lots of academic thought and measurements, handloading made with anal attention at detail. It’s much more thought than action. Most of those people made their tools themselves. [There are] It’s plenty of seniors because it takes patience, lots of patience. Sure a teenager ain’t gonna bother it.” — THP

    “I was surprised they did all their hand loading right there on the spot. — I think you nailed it. It’s a super-precise sport. It’s expensive, it’s slow, and it requires a lot of travel, so it’s well-suited for retired folks. It’s gotta beat golfing!” — Tao

    “I used to shoot 6mm PPC in a BR rifle. I spent so much time at the reloading bench that I just gave up on it all and switched to 22 rimfire gallery matches. Saved a lot of my sanity doing that….” — Walt

    Permalink - Videos, Competition 2 Comments »
    May 20th, 2017

    Field Skills: Reading the Wind When Hunting

    On LongRangeHunting.com, you’ll find a good article by Shawn Carlock about wind reading. Shawn is a veteran law enforcement marksman and a past USPSA national precision rifle champion. Shawn offers good advice on how to estimate wind speeds and directions using a multitude of available indicators — not just your wind gauge: “Use anything at your disposal to accurately estimate the wind’s velocity. I keep and use a Kestrel for reading conditions….The Kestrel is very accurate but will only tell you what the conditions are where you are standing. I practice by looking at grass, brush, trees, dust, wind flags, mirage, rain, fog and anything else that will give me info on velocity and then estimate the speed.”

    Shawn also explains how terrain features can cause vertical wind effects. A hunter on a hilltop must account for bullet rise if there is a headwind blowing up the slope. Many shooters consider wind in only one plane — the horizontal. In fact wind has vertical components, both up and down. If you have piloted a small aircraft you know how important vertical wind vectors can be. Match shooters will also experience vertical rise when there is a strong tailwind blowing over an up-sloping berm ahead of the target emplacements. Overall, Shawn concludes: “The more time you spend studying the wind and its effect over varying terrain the more successful you will be as a long-range shooter and hunter.”

    Permalink - Articles, Hunting/Varminting, Shooting Skills 2 Comments »
    May 19th, 2017

    In Remembrance of Dick Grosbier, IBS Vice President

    Obituary Richard Dick Grosbier 2017 White Horse

    Obituary Richard Dick Grosbier 2017 White HorseWe are sad to announce that Richard (Dick) Grosbier, who served as IBS Vice President and webmaster, has passed away. He died unexpectedly at his home last Friday, May 12, while recovering from neck fusion surgery. He was 72. A memorial service was held on May 16th. We offer condolences to Carol, his wife of 38 years, and to his family members.

    Dick Grosbier was one of the stalwarts of the International Benchrest Shooters (IBS) who gave countless hours to our sport. Jeff Stover, IBS President, notes: “Dick was serving as the 1st VP of IBS and was the Match Chairman. Dick worked tirelessly on behalf of our sport. Dick was very well known in benchrest, especially in the Score discipline. He has been the IBS webmaster from Day One. He was a central figure in the IBS and Benchrest as a whole.” Jeff adds that Dick’s passing leaves “a pronounced void in the world of Benchrest. He was a good man. We shall miss him.”

    Many benchrest competitors have expressed their sadness at Dick’s passing:

    “He was one of the most helpful and concerned people I have met in benchrest, an enthusiastic and helpful shooter with as big a heart as anyone I have ever met. I thoroughly enjoyed my numerous phone conversations with him over the years. He will be sadly missed by all his Maine friends.”– Greg P.

    “Dick did a lot for the sport. It’s going to be hard to replace a man like him.” — Dick Wright

    “We are truly diminished. He will be missed. My condolences to family and friends.” — James Mock

    “I had met Dick several times as I traveled around in my shooting career. Dick gave freely of his talents and time to support the sport he dearly loved. Dick made a difference in the World. It’s a better place for him having been here.” — Al Nyhus

    Honoring Dick Grosbier at the White Horse Range in West Virginia
    The day after he died, Dick’s friends and fellow shooters honored him. On May 13th, at the 1000-yard match held at the White Horse Range in West Virginia, Stanley Taylor, David Matthew and the other competitors all took one shot at a special target placed at 1000 yards, which they all signed. The group then said a prayer and held a moment of silence for Dick. It was a thoughtful and fitting tribute to a fellow shooter. The match directors are planning a Memorial match for Grosbier later this year.

    Obituary Richard Dick Grosbier 2017 White Horse

    R.I.P. Richard Roland Grosbier
    Dick Grosbier was a man of many talents and interests. Here is a quote from his Obituary in the Frederick (MD) News-Post:

    After high school Dick joined the Air Force, from 1965-1967 serving as an Aircraft Electronics Navigational Equipment repairman. This training enabled him to begin his life’s work in the electronics field, first with Heathkit Electronics in Rockville, and later with Industrial Photo of Silver Spring.

    Dick enjoyed many varied activities. He met [his wife] Carol at a sports car club, and they participated in many car rallies. He was very interested in computers[.] He was Vice-President of the International Benchrest Shooters and enjoyed benchrest target shooting at many rifle ranges up and down the east coast. He was also very involved in model railroading[.] Dick loved to travel and with his wife made several coast-to-coast trips across the U.S., visiting almost all the lower 48 states, and Hawaii.

    Permalink Competition, News 2 Comments »
    May 19th, 2017

    Make Your Own Threaded Case for Measuring Length to Lands

    Hornady Stony Point Tool OAL O.A.L. gauge bullet seating length ogive checker

    In this video, Forum member Erik Cortina shows how to create a custom modified case for use with the Hornady Lock-N-Load Overall Length Gauge (formerly the Stoney Point Tool). While Hornady sells modified cases for many standard cartridges, if you shoot a wildcat such as the 6mm Dasher or .284 Shehane, you’ll need to create a custom modified case*. And even if you shoot a standard cartridge such as the .308 Winchester you can get more consistent measurements if you make a custom modified case from a piece of brass fired in your chamber.

    The process is straight-forward. Take a piece of brass fired in your chamber and full-length size it (with about .002″ shoulder bump). Then you need to drill out the primer pocket. Erik uses a mini-lathe for the operation, but this general process can be done with a drill press or other tools. Erik shows how to do this with a 0.290″ HSS (High Speed Steel) drill bit on a mini-lathe. After drilling the hole comes the tricky part — you need to tap the case with the precise 5/16″ x 36 threads per inch (tpi) right-hand thread that matches the male thread on the O.A.L. Gauge. This 5/16″ x 36 tpi tap is pretty uncommon, but you can order it from Amazon.com if you can’t source it locally.

    Hornady Stony Point Tool OAL O.A.L. gauge bullet seating length ogive checker

    If you use a mini-lathe, Erik suggests loosening the tailstock slightly, so it can float while cutting the threads. Erik also says: “Make sure you get the tap on pretty tight — it’s going to want to spin.” Erik turns the case at about 100 rpm when tapping the threads. Once the case and tap are rigged, the actual tapping process (see video at 6:00) takes only a few seconds. While the mini-lathe makes the tapping process go more quickly, the threading can also be done with other systems.

    TIP: Don’t just make one modified case, make three. That gives you one for your range kit, one for your home reloading bench, plus a spare (since you WILL eventually lose or misplace one).


    Here’s the Stuff You Need

    Hornady Stony Point Tool OAL O.A.L. gauge bullet seating length ogive checker

    5/16″-36 TPI Threading Tap
    The required thread is somewhat uncommon. You need a 5/16″ – 36 tpi Right Hand Thread Tap. If you can’t find it locally, Amazon.com carries the correct tap. Erik notes: “The 5/16-36 tpi tap is not a common size. I think Hornady did this on purpose to make it more difficult for the average guy to make his own modified cases.”

    0.290″ Drill Bit
    Erik uses an 0.290″ HSS “L” drill bit. (This “L” Letter Gauge code designates a 0.290″ diameter bit). A close metric equivalent would be 7.3 mm (0.286″). Erik says: “A 9/32″ drill will also work but it will be harder to run the tap in since the hole will be .281″ instead of .290″ with the Letter Gauge L bit.”

    Tips for Using O.A.L. Gauge with Modified Case
    We’ve noticed that many folks have trouble getting reliable, consistent results when they first start using the Hornady O.A.L. Gauge (formerly the Stoney Point Tool). We’ve found this is usually because they don’t seat the modified case properly and because they don’t use a gentle, consistent method of advancing the bullet until it just kisses the lands.

    Here is our suggested procedure for use the O.A.L. Gauge. Following this method we can typically make three of four measurements (with the same bullet), all within .001″ to .0015″. (Yes, we always measure multiple times.)

    1. Clean your chamber so there is no build-up of carbon, debris, or lube. Pay particular attention to the shoulder area.

    2. Screw the modified case on to the O.A.L. Gauge. Make sure it is seated firmly (and doesn’t spin loose). Note, you may have to re-tighten the modified case after insertion in the chamber.

    3. Place your selected bullet so that the ogive (max bullet diameter) is behind the case mouth. This prevents the bullet from “snagging” as you insert the tool in the action.

    4. Insert the O.A.L. Gauge into your chamber smoothly. Push a little until you feel resistance. IMPORTANT — You need to ensure that the shoulder of the modified case is seated firmly against the front of your chamber. You may have to wiggle and twist the tool slightly. If you do not have the modified case seated all the way in, you will NOT get a valid measurement.

    5. Advance the bullet slowly. (NOTE: This is the most important aspect for consistency!). Push the rod of the O.A.L. tool gently towards the chamber. DON’T shove it hard! Easy does it. Stop when you feel resistance.

    6. IMPORTANT. After gently pushing on the rod, give the end of the rod a couple forward taps with your finger. If your bullet was slightly skewed, it may have stopped too far back. Adding a couple extra taps will fix that. If the bullet moves after the taps, then again push gently on the rod. NOT too much! You just want to push the bullet until it just “kisses” the lands and then stops. Do NOT jam the bullet into the rifling. If you do that you will never get consistent results from one measurement to the next.

    * For a $15.00 fee, Hornady will make a custom modified case for you if you send two fired pieces of brass. Send two fired cases and $15.00 check to: Hornady Manufacturing, Attn: Modified Cases, 108 S. Apollo St., Alda, NE 68810. More Info HERE.

    Permalink - Videos, Reloading, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
    May 19th, 2017

    Great Promo — Get 25% Off Champion Products

    Midsouth Champion Targets 25% Rebate

    Here’s a great money-saving Rebate Offer from Champion Targets. Now through May 31, 2017 you can get 25% Off a wide selection of Champion products including paper targets, reactive targets, hearing protection, sand bags, bipods and more. Getting a full 25% Off (with no price limit) is a very good deal, and much better than typical $10 or $20 rebates. GET Champion Rebate FORM. (Right Click and “SAVE AS” to download).

    Here are just a few of the many qualifying Champion products, as sold by Midsouth Shooters Supply. With the Champion Mail-In Rebate, your net cost is just 75% of the listed price(s).

    Midsouth Champion Targets 25% Rebate

    Permalink Hot Deals, Hunting/Varminting Post comment »
    May 18th, 2017

    Registration Open for $250K World Shooting Championship

    World Shooting Championship Bruce Piatt Multi-Gun Peacemaker, Glengary West Virginia

    How’d you like to score a check for $25,000? That’s the winner’s pay-out for the 2017 World Shooting Championship (WSC), which runs September 14-16 at the Peacemaker National Training Center in Glengary, WV. This event offers over $250,000 in cash awards and product prizes, making the WSC the richest combined shooting event in the USA (if not the world). This unique 3-day multi-gun match tests competitors’ skills across twelve challenging stages involving nearly every major shooting discipline for rifles, shotguns, and pistols.

    WSC Home Page + Rules | Descriptions of 2017 WSC Stages | 2017 WSC Registration Page

    World Shooting Championship Bruce Piatt Multi-Gun Peacemaker, Glengary West Virginia

    This major match attracts both sponsored Pros and “regular Joes”. For 2017, shooters will be split into two groups: a Professional Division for sponsored shooters, and the Amateur Division for non-sponsored competitors. All firearms, optics, and ammo will be provided by match sponsors for both divisions. “This year the NRA is going back to basics and returning the match to the original format of two divisions for professionals and amateurs, putting everyone on an even playing field”, said Cole McCulloch, NRA Competitive Shooting Director.

    WSC Highlight Video with Competitor Interviews:

    What the Competitors Have to Say:
    “We’ve been waiting all our lives for a match like this, so we can come over (from the UK) [and] shoot guns that we can’t even own in the UK, because of the laws. What the NRA has done is really great — this is a ground-breaking type of match.” John C., Amateur Competitor (UK)

    “The main reason I signed up is just the ease of it… I don’t have to have thousands of dollars worth of guns. It’s a good way to try out all the different events.” — M.J., Amateur Competitor

    “What makes this event very unique, especially to a professional shooter, is all the equipment is supplied. You have to leave your ego at home and just try to adapt as best you can to the equipment that you have supplied.” — Jerry Miculek

    Video Shows 2014 World Shooting Champion SFC Daniel Horner in 3-Gun Stage

    Cash Awards, Huge Prize Table, and New Random Drawings
    The NRA World Shooting Championship will offer $250,000 in cash and prizes. Along with the $25,000 winner’s pay-out, there will be fat cash prizes for second and third place overall, High Lady, and High Amateur Junior. Then there are the prize tables — a real treasure trove. The designated Amateur prize table by itself will offer products and certificates topping $100,000 in value.

    NEW Random Drawings — The WSC has added a new type of prize for 2017. Ten (10) Random Draw Prize Winners of $400 will be chosen during the WSC Awards Banquet. These random drawings give every competitor a chance to win cash, no matter what their event ranking.

    How to Register for 2017 WSC

    CLICK HERE for Registration Page

    Match entry fees are $395 for Professionals, $325 for Amateurs and Juniors. All firearms and ammunition are provided, and entry fees include one awards banquet ticket. For more information, visit WSC.NRA.org, call 703-267-1479, or email NRAhighpower@nrahq.org.

    How to Win the World Shooting Championship

    As first published in the NRA Blog, here are competition tips from 2015 NRA World Shooting Champion Bruce Piatt, and Dianna Muller, the top female competitor at the 2015 WSC:

    “The format at the NRA World Shooting Championship is unique in that you don’t know what you have to shoot until you show up, so training for the event is a little difficult. My advice is to pack some good eye and ear protection, bring an open mind, be prepared to listen to the stage descriptions, figure out the best way you can take the guns they provide, and post the best score you can. When the match supplies all the guns and ammo, all you have to do is deal with ‘the performance’. This is the most level playing field in the shooting sports — anyone from around the world can come and play.” — Bruce Piatt

    World Shooting Championship Bruce Piatt Multi-Gun Peacemaker, Glengary West Virginia

    “The [WSC] is such a different breed — it’s really a difficult match for which to prepare! You are tackling disciplines outside your expertise and using guns you aren’t familiar with, and that can really rattle your nerves if you don’t prepare for that mental challenge. But you can use this match design to your advantage. Remove all expectations, because, who is great at ALL the disciplines (besides Jerry Miculek)?! Give yourself some room to be ‘not so great’, focus on the fundamentals and try to enjoy the match. It is kind of liberating throwing everything to the wind and seeing how you stack up against all kinds of shooters!” — Dianna Muller

    Permalink Competition, News Post comment »
    May 18th, 2017

    FREE Shipping Promos at Natchez and Graf & Sons

    Natchez Shooters Supply Free Shipping May 2017

    Natchez Shooters Supply boasts some of the best prices on the web for loaded ammunition, bullets, reloading gear, and optics. And now there’s even more incentive to shop at Natchez. Now through May 21, 2017, you can get FREE Shipping at Natchez for all orders of $100.00 or more. To get this FREE Shipping use Code FSB1705 during check-out, for orders placed through 11:59 pm EST on 5/21/17.

    As you’d expect, there is some fine print — Hazmat charges still apply for powder/primers, oversize charges still apply, and Gun Safes and certain other large/heavy products are excluded. But this is still a very attractive offer, that could easily save you $15-$30 on a typical order.

    Natchez Shooters Supply Free Shipping May 2017

    Above are some of the best deals available at Natchez right now. If you need loaded pistol and rimfire ammo this is a great source. Also the surplus SKB case less than half the price of what a case of this quality normally costs. With inside dimensions of 50″ x 14.5″ x 5″, it is big enough for most match rifles.

    FREE Shipping Offer at Grafs.com

    Graf & Sons, one of our favorite retailers, is running a FREE shipping promo too. Grafs has competitive pricing, a great selection of Lapua brass and premium projectiles, plus top-flight reloading gear, such as the AMP Annealer.

    Graf & Sons Grafs free shipping promo code May Sale

    Now through May 24, 2017 you can get FREE Shipping with orders of $75.00 or more. This way Grafs.com waives its normal regular $7.95 handling fee. As you’d expect, Hazmat fees and oversize charges still apply and close-out items are excluded. CLICK HERE for details.

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Hot Deals Post comment »
    May 17th, 2017

    PRS 101: Practical Shooter’s Guide by Marcus Blanchard

    Marcus Blanchard Practical Shooter's Guide

    Thinking of getting started in the Practical/Tactical shooting game? Looking for ways to be more stable when shooting from unconventional positions? Then you may want to read Marcus Blanchard’s Practical Shooter’s Guide (A How-To Approach for Unconventional Firing Positions and Training). Unlike almost every “how to shoot” book on the market, Blanchard’s work focuses on the shooting skills and positions you need to succeed in PRS matches and similar tactical competitions. Blanchard provides clear advice on shooting from barricades, from roof-tops, from steep angles. Blanchard says you need to train for these types of challenges: “I believe the largest factor in the improvement of the average shooter isn’t necessarily the gear; it’s the way the shooter approaches obstacles and how they properly train for them.”

    Marcus Blanchard Practical Shooter's Guide

    Blanchard also offers good tips on shooting fundamentals. Here’s an example:

    Blanchard on Trigger Control
    “There will always be some amount of wobble when shooting in positions other than prone, and timing the shot to go off when the reticle is within the target is difficult to accomplish when poor trigger techniques are employed. The most common [mistake] I have seen is ‘slapping’ the trigger. The finger is usually hovering off the trigger, and when the shooter determines that NOW is the time to fire, they quickly pull their finger to the rear and ‘slap’ the trigger. The finger never pulls the trigger in the same place and often provokes a sympathetic contraction of the rest of the muscles in the hand, which results in unwanted movement before the bullet exits the muzzle.”

    Author Marcus Blanchard has the credentials. A Marine Corps veteran, Blanchard is a regular Top 10 finisher in Precision Rifle Series events. In 2015 Blanchard was ranked 8th overall (nationwide) in the PRS series at year’s end. In 2016 Blanchard won the New Mexico Precision Rifleman’s Championship.

    Check out the Table of Contents to see the Topics Covered:

    Practical Shooter's Guide Tactical training book
    Click image above to view larger Table of Contents.

    6.5 Guys Recommend Practical Shooter’s Guide
    The 6.5 Guys have reviewed Blanchard’s book and they recommend it highly: “What’s a good book for the beginning shooter who wants to get into long range precision rifle or the intermediate shooter who wants to improve his scores? [The Practical Shooter’s Guide] is particularly useful because it explores firing from various positions and props that are encountered in long range precision rifle [events]. This knowledge is completely missing from more traditional books where the shooter is usually slung up and shooting at a paper target. Marcus… goes into considerable detail about shooting from rooftops, reverse rooftops, side slopes, tank traps, barricades etc. This is the type of information that is very difficult to find. We consider ourselves reasonably knowledgeable shooters and this book provided us with new and useful information.” CLICK HERE for 6.5 Guys REVIEW.

    6.5 Guys Review Marcus Blanchard’s Practical Shooter’s Guide

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