May 30th, 2008

6XC Performs Well for High Power and Long-Range Shooters

The 6XC cartridge was developed by David Tubb, and it has captured multiple Camp Perry Championships. Now that Norma brass is available, the 6XC is an outstanding choice for shooters looking for an ultra-accurate, easy-recoiling cartridge that offers more “horsepower” than the 6BR or 6BR Improved. Team Norma, shooting factory-loaded 6XC ammo, captured last year’s 300m world championship. This was the first time in many years that a cartridge other than the 6BR has won “all the marbles” in international 300m competition.

Forum members and 6XC shooters Mudcat and German Salazar are both very happy with their choice of chamberings. German tells us:

“The 6XC is a great long-range cartridge, it needs no excuses and can hold its own against any other LR cartridge. I prefer to use Norma 6XC brass, but 22-250 brass can be used by running through a 6XC full-length die and then fire-forming. It will look pretty nasty at first, but it will shoot just fine even fire-forming. I have an article in the May 2007 issue of Precision Shooting that covers this and other 6XC matters.

I principally use the 6XC for 1000-yard prone shooting (sometimes at 600). The main bullet I use is the Berger 115 VLD (in a 30″ Krieger with 1:7.5″ twist). The best powder I’ve found for the Berger 115 in the 6XC is H4831sc. Velocity is in the 3000 fps range. I haven’t pressure tested this combination so I’m reluctant to publish exact loads, sorry.

Whether the 6XC is ideal for any given person depends on a lot of factors. I tend to shoot fast and keep the rifle in my shoulder. Accordingly, a low-recoil cartridge suits me because it doesn’t require any repositioning of the rifle or rebuilding of position during a 22-shot string. I know how to read wind, so whether a cartridge drifts a few inches more or less than another isn’t really a concern to me, I learn the cartridge’s behaviour and work with what I’ve got. The 6XC shines because it is ACCURATE at 1000 yards and without that, you’ve got nothing.

Accuracy, low recoil, reasonable wind drift, good component availability, decent barrel life, what else is there to want in a long-range cartridge?”


Mudcat concurs that the 6XC is a great cartridge for High Power Competition:

“I am not sure there really are ‘downsides’ for the 6XC. Well, maybe barrel life, if you are used to shooting a 223 or 308. I have fired about 15,000 rounds of 6XC over the last couple of years and havent really found a negative. My 6XC barrels get an easy 2,000 rounds. In fact, most get upwards of 3,000 before I move them to strictly off-hand and rapid-fire use. (I am a High Power shooter, not a Benchrester.)

Propellant — Powder choices are excellent. However, contrary to what German has found, I can’t get H4831sc to get me the velocity that the H4350 can. I have found only two powders that deliver more speed than H4350.

Cases — Just use Winchester 22-250 cases as they last 20+ firings and you never have to trim them. I use Winchester 22-250 brass rather than any of the Tubb or Norma offerings — they are just too soft for my liking. With the Winchester, I know what I am dealing with and know I will get at least 20 firings out of it, on average. And, I never have to trim it. While I have a Giraud power trimmer, I would just as soon not do it.

Bullets — Well, 6mm bullets are out there for about anything you want to shoot.

Velocity — The 6XC offers plenty of speed. Is 3000+ fps with a 115 enough for you? I certainly hope so.

Accuracy — I can’t out shoot the 6XC round. About any decent load will work just fine. Shoot, all my 300-yard and less ammo is loaded on a Dillon 650! Overall, I agree with German, the 6XC will definitely hold its own and I am not sure that my 6.5×284 running 142s at 2950 fps actually drifts much less than the 115 VLDs.”

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May 30th, 2008

Garand Walnut Stocks on Sale

Many of our readers enjoy classic military rifles as well as precision BR rigs and varmint rifles. Now through June 30th, MidwayUSA has Boyd’s M1 Garand replacement stocks on sale for just $89.99, marked down from $104.99 (item 107223). Boyd’s Garand stocks are fully-inletted and crafted from quality American Walnut. Very slight trimming and sanding may be required, but otherwise this is a “drop-in” stock.

There is a superb article by Jamie Magnum on SurplusRifle.com that explains how to install a Boyd’s Walnut stock on your Garand. The author provides complete step-by-step instructions showing how to remove the old stock, and attach the new stock. Through a series of 75 photos, the article covers every aspect of the job, including inletting, and making sure all the metal connectors are attached properly.

CLICK HERE for Downlodable .PDF version of Garand Article.

SurplusRifle.com is an online service of Tennessee Gun Parts, Covington, TN, 1-866-472-4986.

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May 30th, 2008

Rare Tikka 595 with Select Wood on Auction Arms

Most of the Tikka 595s that made it to the States came with a synthetic stock or rather ordinary wood stock. Right now, on Auction Arms, there’s a very clean Tikka 595 with a really nice stock in highly-figured walnut with contrasting forearm tip. Chambered in 22-250, it’s a very handsome rifle, and the 595 action is slick and strong. We’re hoping one of our regular readers snags this gem. Current bid price is $625.00. Forum member Fireball tells us the Tikka 595 22-250 magazines will also feed 6BR and 22BR cartridges well if you plan to re-barrel this rifle and chamber a different cartridge. We’d just shoot it “as is”, at least until the barrel wore out.

Tikka 595 Walnut

Tikka 595 Walnut

Tikka 595 Walnut

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