July 19th, 2009

Rifle Trigger Springs from Ernie-The-Gunsmith

Ernie Paull from California was an active competition shooter for many years. However, his eyesight has declined so he has turned his attention to providing components for shooters and gunsmiths. Through his Ernie the Gunsmith website, Paull sells a variety of useful products including gun trigger springs, pillar-bedding kits, Accu-Risers, and pillar installation tools. This Bulletin post focuses on Ernie’s trigger springs. Ernie offers springs for a wide variety of rifles: Browning (A-Bolt, A-Bolt 22, X-Bolt), CZ (m452), Kimber, Remington (XR100, XCR, 7, 700, 722, 788, 7600 and more), Ruger (77, 77-22, LC6), Tikka (T-3), Weatherby (MK-V), and Winchester (M-70).

Springs start at just $6.95. Ernie also sells springs for the Rem-compatible Shilen Benchrest trigger, as well as Rem 700 ejector springs and trigger alignment springs. For Rem 700 rifles, Paull makes a spring that fits all Remington M-7 and M-700 triggers including the 2007-vintage X Mark-PRO trigger (but not the new X Mark-PRO trigger introduced in 2009). Ernie says: “on average, installation of his Model-700 spring will reduce factory triggers’ weight of pull by 1½ to 2½ lbs with no other changes. The exact amount of creep, overtravel, and weight of pull are dependant upon the type and amount of tuning accomplished by your gunsmith.”

We often hear requests from Tikka T-3 owners asking how they can reduce their trigger pull weight. Paull offers a Tikka T-3 varmint trigger spring which can reduce the pull weight significantly. The photo at left shows the Tikka T-3 trigger assembly.

While there is more to a good trigger job (in most cases) than just a spring swap, you need to have the proper rate spring when adjusting trigger pull weight downwards. NOTE: For safety reasons, we recommend you consult a competent gunsmith before modifying factory triggers. We stress the word competent…

Ernie has observed that some gunsmiths try to lighten trigger pulls by modifying factory springs in questionable ways: “I have worked with gunsmiths in the past who, when the subject turned to trigger springs, preferred to clip them, grind them, heat them, bend them, smash them, or simply back out the weight of pull screw until there was no or almost no pressure on the spring. With any of these methods, you get a spring whose rate is rapidly rising as the trigger is pulled. As the trigger is released, the spring rate rapidly decreases as it approaches full or near-full extension. A more uniform weight of pull will be achieved when the trigger spring is compressed within its normal working range throughout the entire movement of the trigger. In the long run, the benefits of saved time, plus more uniform and reliable results, will more than offset the cost of these [replacement] springs. If you want a lighter trigger pull, you need a lighter trigger spring.”

Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product 2 Comments »
July 19th, 2009

Gunvault Introduces New, Portable MicroVault

MicroVault Gun SafeA handgun is useless for home defense unless it is readily accessible in an emergency. At that same time, you must keep handguns safely secured from children and curious house guests. The “loaded .45 under the pillow” is a bad idea. There are many small handgun safes on the market, but most are still too large to be placed at arm’s reach, but out of sight, inside a dresser drawer or bedside table drawer.

Gunvault’s new MicroVault, measuring 11″ x 8 1/2″ x 2 1/4″, is ideal for bedside table installations. It can be secured via four bolt holes in the bottom. Using the No-Eyes® Keypad, a special set of finger-activated push-pads, the MicroVault can be unlocked in under three seconds — we’ve tested this ourselves. It is a reliable set-up that is much faster than using a key or spinning a combo lock. The finger-slot system also works in the dark, unlike most electronic numeric keypads.

MicroVault Gun Safe

MicroVault for Vehicle Applications
There are also situations where you want to transport a handgun in a locked case, but still want to be able to access the weapon in seconds. The new MicroVault serves that purpose well. In many states, it is illegal to carry a handgun in your vehicle unless it is in a locked container. (This assumes you do NOT have a separate concealed carry license.) But if that lockbox has a conventional hasp lock or combination lock with small tumblers, you’re not going to be able to access the weapon in a hurry. With the Microvault, your gun can be secured in the glove box or center console, yet still be accessed in seconds by pressing the right combination of fingers. LEGAL NOTE: In some jurisdictions handguns must be in a locked container in a remote part of the vehicle (e.g. backseat or the trunk), not immediately accessible by the driver. CHECK YOUR LOCAL LAWS.

If you need to transport a handgun, the MicroVault also serves as a secure, locked container that will fit inside a backpack or attache case. The standard MicroVault (model MV500) is available from vendors such as SportCo Warehouse for about $90.00. There is also a “biometric” version that works by reading your fingerprint. Potentially, the biometric MicroVault (model MVB500) offers the fastest access of all. It retails for about $175.00.

Permalink New Product 1 Comment »