May 1st, 2011

Pacific Tool and Gauge Offers Bolt Shrouds and Muzzle Brakes

Want to dress up your Remington 700 or Rem-Clone receivers at a modest cost? Check out these new CNC bolt shrouds from Pacific Tool and Gauge (PTG). PTG now offers handsome Nesika-style and Lawton-style bolt shrouds for Rem-spec bolts. The aluminum Nesika-style shrouds come in silver or black finish and cost $18.50. The aluminum Lawton-style shroud comes in a silver finish only but it costs just $7.50 while supplies last. Give your Rem action the look of a custom, or enhance your Rem clone action for under twenty bucks.

PTG bolt Shroud Rem 700

PTG bolt Shroud Rem 700Affordable PTG Muzzle Brakes
Many of you may not know this, but PTG now makes muzzle brakes — and they are a great value. The Standard Muzzle Brake, shown at right, costs just $49.90. It measures 1.80″ OAL .817″ x .940″ Taper (5/8-28 thread pitch). PTG’s Universal Short Muzzle Brake, with dimensions 1.100″ OAL x .750″ OD with 1/2-28 x .300 deep thread, is just $39.90. Though very affordable, these PTG muzzle brakes really work. A well-designed muzzle brake can reduce felt recoil by up to 30% (depending on caliber). When installed properly, quality brakes normally won’t hurt accuracy, although they can affect barrel harmonics so you may need to adjust your load.

This story suggested by Edlongrange. We invite other submissions from our readers.
Disclosure: Pacific Tool and Gauge has advertised with AccurateShooter.com.

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May 1st, 2011

Best Wallet Group Ever? 1.86" 5-Shot Group at 1000 Yards

What’s a “wallet group”? It’s a singularly spectacular proof target that entitles its bearer to bragging rights. The wallet group may or may not have been shot in competition, and, by definition, it may not be repeatable. But it exists as incontrovertible proof that, at least once, the stars aligned, and the wind gods smiled on the shooter.

1000-yard record groupFive Shots in 0.178 MOA at 1000 Yards
A couple seasons back, Forum member and F-Class shooter Gary Wood was testing his 6.5-284 rifle at the 1000-yard range in Coalinga, California, getting ready for an up-coming long range match. In practice, Gary nailed a witnessed 1.859″ five-shot group, with four of the five shots well under an inch. Use this as proof to win those club-house arguments about whether it is possible to shoot “in the ones” at 1000 yards. Gary’s group worked out to 0.178 MOA!

Gary reports: “I was load testing with 5-shot groups. Each group was shot on a new F-Class center and pulled by Ret. Master Chief Jerry Pullens and spotted by an other long-range shooter. The second 5-shot load group looked really small … by our reckoning four out of five shots measured under an inch. I was amazed. What’s more, when I shot the group, the 4th shot blew the spindle out of the 3rd shot. My spotter saw that in his scope and Jerry Pullens told me about it afterwards”.

As measured with the OnTarget Software, using a scan of the target, Gary plotted the group size at 1.859″ total for five shots, or 0.178 MOA. Gary noted: “I had everyone sign the target which I saved and photographed.” Yes, Gary, this may be the wallet group to end all wallet groups. You should have that target framed.

1000-yard record group

Gary’s Load and 6.5-284 Rifle Specs
Gary’s load was 48 grains of Hodgdon H4350 and CCI BR-2 primers, pushing 142gr Sierra MKs, in Lapua 6.5-284 brass. The rifle features an F-class, single-shot Surgeon action with a Bartlein 5R barrel chambered with a no-turn neck. Gary says “The barrel only has 70 rounds through it… yep, I think it will shoot.” Gary did all of the gunsmithing and barrel work himself.

Did Gary have any special reloading tricks? Apparently not: “Other than weighing the cases and the powder very carefully, there really were no magical reloading secrets used. The Sierra 142s were moly-coated straight from the box of 500, but they were not weighed or checked for bearing surface. The powder was dropped with a RCBS ChargeMaster then checked with an Acculab scale (to under a tenth). The Lapua cases were not neck-turned, but I did weight-sort them. The five cases for the small group weighed: 195.05, 195.03, 195.03, 195.03, 195.01.”

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May 1st, 2011

Stanley Rolling Tool Chest Holds Your Bench Gear

Stanley mobile tool chestHow do you haul a heavy front rest, jumbo rear sand-bag, ammo boxes, and all the miscellaneous gear you need for a Benchrest or F-Class match? Stanley makes an inexpensive, lockable Pro Mobile Tool Chest (product 033023R) with a 25-quart capacity that holds plenty of gear.

This wheeled tool chest is big enough for large joystick rests, and rolls on large rubber-coated wheels. Two feet long and 16″ deep, the cargo compartment has lots of space for the big stuff, and the included yellow tool tray will hold smaller components such as dies, priming tools, and loading blocks. On the left and right side of the top lid are two small transparent parts compartments that can store small parts, bullets, ear-plugs, nuts and bolts. Overall, it’s a very handy, versatile rig.

The Stanley Pro Mobile Tool Chest, model 033023R, is available online and through major home hardware stores. Amazon.com sells the Pro Mobile Tool Chest for $48.68. And if you want even more storage space, Stanley makes an even larger 19″x29″x18″, 24-gallon-capacity wheeled chest (product 029025R) that sells for $70.49.

Stanley mobile tool chest

Australian Robert Carnell uses this rolling tool chest to haul his SEB rest and other gear: “Below is the Stanley cart I modified to use for carting all my various gear around from bench to bench at a match. By cutting out one of the pockets in the liner, my SEB rest fits in nicely on its side, with lots of room for the rear bag and pads etc. I also often pack all the various loading gear around this as well. Then I wheel it into the loading room, drop the loading stuff on the bench, then park it outside on the line behind my first bench.”

Stanley mobile tool chest

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