August 11th, 2011

CMP Photo Galleries from National Matches at Camp Perry

You can view hundreds of photos from the National Matches at Camp Perry at the CMP’s Zenfolio Image Archive on the web. There are separate collections for each event, with up to 450 images per collection. Once you open a particular collection, you can click through the images individually or select the “slide show” option. For you vintage rifle fans, here are some images from the Springfield & Vintage Military Rifle Match, the John C. Garand Match, and the Vintage Sniper Rifle Match.

Springfield & Vintage Military Match

John C. Garand Match


Vintage Sniper Rifle Match

CLICK HERE to see all CMP National Match Photos

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August 11th, 2011

Powers Wins Prestigious President’s Trophy Match

By Steve Cooper, CMP Writer
Civilian shooter Konrad Powers, 41, of Carol Stream, IL won the storm-shortened 2011 President’s Rifle Trophy Match at Camp Perry Monday, 1 August, with an aggregate score of 295-8X out of 300 points possible, topping SSG Ty Cooper, 26, U.S. Army and SGT Christopher Atkins, 24, U.S. Army Reserve, who placed second and third, respectively. Powers fired a 98-3X in off-hand shooting at 200 yards, 99-3X in rapid-fire prone at 300 yards and 98-2X in prone slow-fire at 600 yards with his service rifle.

In junior shooting, Tyler Rico, 17, of Tucson, Arizona placed first with an aggregate score of 288-8X in an X-count tiebreaker over James London, 17, of Statesville, North Carolina who finished with a 288-4X. Rico’s score also placed him 38th overall in the match. He fired scores of 95-2X, 99-5X, 94-1X in offhand, rapid prone and slow prone, respectively.

First fired in 1878, the President’s Rifle Match, a National Trophy Rifle Match, was incorporated into the National Match program after the Nationals were established in 1903. The President’s Rifle and Pistol Matches have become especially prestigious because the match winners traditionally receive letters of congratulations from the President of the United States of America. Shooters who place 100th or better in the match are given special recognition as members of the President’s Hundred, a distinction highly prized in both civilian and military circles.

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August 11th, 2011

Charter Arms Offers .40-Cal Rimless Revolver (No Moon Clips)

Charter Arms .40 SW revolverCharter Arms has apparently revived its 40 S&W Rimless Revolver, first announced in 2009. Charter Arms claims its 40 S&W Revolver is the “world’s first .40 caliber Rimless Revolver”.

Built on the same stainless steel frame as the .44 Special Pit Bull wheelgun, the new 5-shot .40 S&W Pit Bull Revolver weighs 20 ounces, and measures 6.75″ overall with a 2.3 inch barrel. The gun has a fixed frame rear sight and a ramped front sight with a standard hammer. A DAO hammer is available upon request. Rubber grips are standard.

Dual Coil Spring Extractor Design Eliminates Need for Moonclips
The Charter Arms .40 S&W Revolver features a rimless cartridge extractor assembly. A dual coil spring assembly is located in the extractor to allow the insertion and retention of a .40 caliber cartridge in each chamber of the revolvers’ cylinder. What sets the new Charter Arms apart from previous revolvers chambered for rimless cartridges is the built-in coil spring that grabs the cartridges’ extractor groove. This enables the gun to work without moon clips used in other revolver designs.

Charter Arms .40 SW revolver

.40 S&W Revolver Makes Sense as Back-Up for .40 S&W Duty Pistol
Why do we need a revolver that shoots .40 S&W when there are perfectly good options for .38 Special, .357 Magnum and other popular rimmed cartridges? According to Charter Arms President Nick Ecker, the firearms industry has had a “long felt need” for a revolver that fires .40 S&W rimless ammo. Ecker explains: “The Pit Bull is the ideal revolver for law enforcement officers to use as their back up, because they can now carry a revolver that utilizes the same ammo as their sidearm. It gives them the first revolver that shoots their [.40 S&W] ammo without utilizing moon clips.” It is not clear whether the new .40-Cal Pit Bull can shoot the hotter 10mm rimless ammo as well. We note that the barrel of the gun is marked “Pit Bull 40 S&W”.

COMMENT: We hope Charter Arms applies its rimless extractor design to a 9mm Parabellum version. A 9mm revolver that works reliably without moon clips should be very popular. In a lightweight wheelgun, the 9mm (with its lesser recoil) would be more controllable than the .40 S&W round. The .40 S&W has a stout kick even in a full-size, all-metal duty pistol. 9mm ammo is also much more affordable than 40 S&W ammunition. We note that when Charter Arms first announced its “Rimless Revolvers” two years ago, it claimed it would also release a .45 ACP version and “90-120 days after the .45 ACP will come the 9mm”. Charter Arms has not revealed whether it still plans to bring out either a .45 ACP or 9mm Rimless Revolver. In 2009, Charter Arms listed these prices: 9mm $399.00, .40 $449.00, .45 ACP $449.00.

Hindsight: Smith & Wesson 9mm Model 547
Historically, the new .40 Cal Pit Bull is not the first revolver from a major manufacturer to chamber rimless cartridges without moon clips. In the 1980s Smith & Wesson marketed a model 547 9mm revolver that used a spring-loaded detent in the cylinder for case retention. Basically a modified model 13 with 3″ barrel, the model 547 is no longer in production.

Charter Arms .40 SW revolver

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