December 2nd, 2012

Doan Trevor — An Artist with Wood and Metal

Doan Trevor is a master gunsmith and stock-maker who works in the old style. He still hand-crafts stocks from start to finish, and does all the metal-work on the custom rifles he builds. Starting with highly-figured woods, Doan carves and shapes his stocks largely by hand, with meticulous attention to detail. Each rifle he builds is optimized for its intended discipline, and custom-fitted for the customer.

Doan Trevor

Doan Trevor Customer Gunsmithing

With the help of his talented wife Sue (who does the photography and builds the web pages), Doan has created a wonderful website, DoanTrevor.com, that is a feast for the eyes. You can see beautiful wood-stocked rifles being hand-crafted. Doan also illustrates how he creates custom metal parts, and how he beds barreled actions into the finished stocks.

Doan Trevor Customer Gunsmithing

Doan Trevor Customer Gunsmithing
Doan Trevor Customer Gunsmithing

Set aside a few minutes and visit Doan’s website. Be sure to click on the site’s secondary pages: Rifle Building, Woodworking, and Metalworking. You’ll find dozens of high-quality photos and fascinating information on gun-building.

Doan Trevor Customer Gunsmithing

For more information, visit DoanTrevor.com, or call (505) 890-0368, 10am-5pm M-F.

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 5 Comments »
December 2nd, 2012

SCATT IR Rifle Training Systems Used by Top Shooting Teams

SCATT Company, based in Russia, produces an advanced marksmanship training aid that is now being used by many of the world’s top prone and position shooters. The SCATT system uses a gun-mounted infrared (IR) sensor that precisely tracks the movement of the rifle during the aiming process. This tracking data can then be displayed on a computer screen or special electronic targets. In development since 1991, the SCATT system was first employed by the Russian Federation shooting team. However, the SCATT technology was released commercially and is now being used by many other national teams including: USA, China, France, Germany, Japan, and Switzerland.

SCATT Shooting Training System

SCATT Training Systems employ an electronic optical sensor fixed to a gun’s barrel, frame, or the compressed air cylinder of an air gun. The shooter then aims at the electronic target. A trace of the point of aim can then be followed on a ‘real-time’ display screen. When the shooter pulls the gun’s trigger, the point of impact is then displayed on the screen. (This is dry-fire only — no projectiles are loaded). All results of training sessions can be recorded for later analysis. Russian research has shown that SCATT training is both effective and efficient. Using SCATT, beginning marksmen can acquire competitive skills two to three times more quickly than with conventional practice methods alone.

SCATT Shows How an Olympian Holds
The video below shows the aiming patterns of Olympic bronze medalist Miss Snježana Pejčić, a 10m Air Rifle shooter. The SCATT system records the air rifle’s muzzle motions as green traces while Snježana dials in her aim. Her final shot positions (and scores) are recorded when the large circle appears.

scatt shooting trainingSCATT Company has dealers worldwide for its training systems, electronic tragets, and shooting accessories. To order SCATT systems in the USA, contact:

Center Shot Sports

www.CenterShot.com
4300 Rogers Ave., Suite 20,
Box 213
Fort Smith, AR 72903
Phone: 479-262-2584
E-mail: info [at] centershot.com

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills 1 Comment »
December 2nd, 2012

Magazine Subscriptions Make Great Gifts for Gun Guys

If you’re looking for an affordable holiday gift for a shooting buddy or family member, a gift that will be appreciated month after month, consider a magazine subscription. Every month your buddy or relative will get something new in the mail — so it’s like sending a dozen gifts over the course of the year. Your Editor receives a couple magazine subscriptions that were gifts from my brother, and I really do look forward to the magazines’ arrival in my mailbox each month. And each time I open up a new issue of Nat Geo or Shooting Times I think, “Thanks Bro — that was a thoughtful gift — you made my day.”


Permalink Hot Deals No Comments »
December 2nd, 2012

Aiming Advice for F-Class Shooters

In our Shooters Forum, one newcomer wanted some advice on selecting a reticle for F-Class optics. He wondered about the advantage of Forward Focal Plane (FFP) vs. conventional scopes and also wondered if one type of reticle was better for “holding off” than others.

In responding to this question, Forum regular Monte Milanuk provided an excellent summary of aiming methods used in F-Class. For anyone shooting score targets, Monte’s post is worth reading:

Aiming Methods for F-Class Shootingby Monte Milanuk

600-yard F-Class TargetF-Class is a known-distance event, with targets of known dimensions that have markings (rings) of known sizes. Any ‘holding off’ can be done using the target face itself. Most ‘benefits’ of forward focal plain (FFP) optics are null and void here — they work great on two-way ranges where ‘minute of man’ is the defining criteria — but how many FFP scopes do you know of in the 30-40X magnification range? Very, very few, because what people who buy high-magnification scopes want is something that allows them to hold finer on the target, and see more detail of the target, not something where the reticle covers the same amount of real estate and appears ‘coarser’ in view against the target, while getting almost too fine to see at lower powers.

Whether a person clicks or holds off is largely personal preference. Some people might decline to adjust their scope as long as they can hold off somewhere on the target. Some of that may stem from the unfortunate effect of scopes being mechanical objects which sometimes don’t work entirely as advertised (i.e. one or two clicks being more or less than anticipated). Me personally, if I get outside 1-1.5 MOA from center, I usually correct accordingly. I also shoot on a range where wind corrections are often in revolutions, not clicks or minutes, between shots.

Some shooters do a modified form of ‘chase the spotter’ — i.e. Take a swag at the wind, dial it on, aim center and shoot. Spotter comes up mid-ring 10 at 4 o’clock… so for the next shot aim mid-ring 10 at 10 o’clock and shoot. This should come up a center X (in theory). Adjust process as necessary to take into account for varying wind speeds and direction.

John Sigler F-Class

600-yard F-Class TargetOthers use a plot sheet that is a scaled representation of the target face, complete with a grid overlaid on it that matches the increments of their optics — usually in MOA. Take your Swag at the wind, dial it on, hold center and shoot. Shot comes up a 10 o’clock ‘8’… plot the shot on the sheet, look at the grid and take your corrections from that and dial the scope accordingly. This process should put you in the center (or pretty close), assuming that you didn’t completely ignore the wind in the mean time. Once in the center, hold off and shoot and plot, and if you see a ‘group’ forming (say low right in the 10 ring) either continue to hold high and left or apply the needed corrections to bring your group into the x-ring.

Just holding is generally faster, and allows the shooter to shoot fast and (hopefully) stay ahead of the wind. Plotting is more methodical and may save your bacon if the wind completely changes on you… plotting provides a good reference for dialing back the other way while staying in the middle of the target. — YMMV, Monte

Permalink Optics, Shooting Skills 7 Comments »