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December 12th, 2012

Compact Triple-Head Case Prep Machine from Hornady

Hornady Case Prep Assistant TrioHornady offers a handy power case prep tool driver (item 050160) with three power stations. Hornady basically took its previous single-drive Power Case Prep Assistant (item 050155) and added gearing to run three different heads. It took some clever engineering to accomplish this while maintaining the small footprint of the original one-head machine. MSRP for the new Case Prep Trio (item 050160) is $129.39. If you can live with a single power take-off, the older one-head Case Prep Assistant is still offered on “close-out” at some vendors. If you look around you may find one for as little as $79.99.

Hornady Case Prep Assistant Trio

Hornady calls its updated machine, with 3-tool capacity, the Lock-N-Load® Case Prep Trio. With three active stations, you can chamfer, deburr and clean primer pockets without having to change tools. The Case Prep Trio ships with inside chamfer, outside chamfer, and deburr tools. You can also use the machine with other optional 8/32 threaded accessories such as primer pocket reamers and case neck brushes. Conveniently, the Case Prep Trio has on-board storage for your tool-heads.

Hornady Case Prep Assistant Trio

Story tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink New Product, Reloading No Comments »
December 11th, 2012

Sinclair Int’l Gift Cards Can Be Sent at Last Minute

Only 13 more shopping days before Xmas, boys and girls. If you’re getting desperate, as time runs out for buying, packing, and shipping, consider giving an Electronic Gift Card from Sinclair Int’l or Brownells. eGift Cards can be sent at the last minute, and they are as good as cash for shopping with Sinclair Int’l or Brownells. If you prefer the hands-on approach, you can purchase a conventional Sinclair Int’l Gift Card and have it mailed to you or directly to the lucky recipient. CLICK HERE for more details.

Sinclair Int'l Gift Card

Permalink Hot Deals No Comments »
December 11th, 2012

Pro Photographer Yamil Sued Shows How to Capture the Action

Yamil Sued DVD

Yamil SuedYamil Sued provides expert photography tips in Capturing the Action, an instructional DVD from Panteao Productions. In this new DVD, Yamil reviews camera options, camera settings, which lens to use, support gear, range etiquette, positioning and composition, shooting in low light, shooting staged shots, post-production, and much more. Yamil, who also competes in action shooting matches, explains how to get great action photos and memorable images of your fellow shooters. Yamil knows his stuff — he regularly works for Smith & Wesson, Dillon Precision and other top-tier gun industry companies.

Though Yamil is probably best known for his action photography, Yamil is also a gifted studio photographer — you’ve seen his work on numerous magazine and catalog covers.

Watch Preview Trailer for Yamil Sued Photography DVD

Yamil Sued

Yamil Sued

Yamil SuedYamil Sued has been a working professional photographer for 27 years. He is a graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California, with a Major in Illustration Photography and Color Technology.

If you’re looking to achieve pro-quality results when photographing action shooting matches, this video is worth getting. Right now, as a holiday promo good through December 26th, you can pre-order the DVD for $37.49 — that’s 25% off the regular $49.99 price. Order direct from PanteaoProductions.com.

Permalink - Videos No Comments »
December 11th, 2012

Pappas Airgun/Rimfire Front Rest — Artistry in Aluminum

Our friend and product tester Joe Friedrich is the proud owner of a spectacular front rest from James Pappas. This rest is used for both air rifle and rimfire benchrest matches. The fancy Pappas front rest is a shortened, front-support-only version of the Pappas one-piece rest, which is popular with rimfire benchresters. Pappas engineered this rest to comply with air rifle benchrest rules which do not allow use of integrated (one-piece) front and rear rests. The end result was a 30.8-lb masterpiece of machining.

Pappas Air gun front rest

Pappas Air gun front rest

The workmanship on this Pappas front rest is astounding. Accurately described as a “work of art” by Joe Friedrich, this rest, crafted of aircraft-grade aluminum, sets new standards for “Benchrest BLING”. It looks like it should be on display in an art museum. Nearly all components of this rest, including the adjustment controls, have been polished to a mirror finish.

Pappas Air gun front rest

Convenient Rear Windage and Elevation Controls
The Pappas front rest features separate fine-tuning controls for windage and elevation, plus a central gross-elevation control. Normally, once the rest is centered-up on the target, you can make all needed elevation and windage adjustments with the rear (fine-adjustment) controls. In the video below, Joe explains how the controls work as he practices with his modified Theoben Rapid MFR air rifle. Joe hopes to use this new Pappas rest in the upcoming Air Rifle Benchrest Worlds to be held in South Carolina this summer. (Note: In the last minute of the video, the back-lighting was so intensely bright that we lost detail in the foreground. We apologize for that flaw, but you can still hear the audio.)

YouTube Preview Image

Price for this Masterpiece? Don’t Ask…
If you are interested in getting a similar rest, visit PappasRimfireProducts.com, or call James Pappas directly at (817) 735-9883. Be forewarned — James said “If you need to ask about the price, you probably can’t afford it.” This is truly the “Rolls-Royce” of front rests, and it will be priced accordingly.

Permalink - Videos, Competition, New Product No Comments »
December 11th, 2012

Dewey Offers Aluminum Jags and Aluminum-Tipped Rods

For decades shooters have used brass jags attached to brass-tipped cleaning rods. These work effectively. But there is one problem. Many bore solvents will react with the brass metal to give “false positives”. You can get bluish-green patches even when there is no copper fouling in your bore.

To solve this problem DeweyRods.com offers a full line of aluminum jags, aluminum brush adapters, and nylon-coated cleaning rods with aluminum tips. Dewey explains: “Ammonia-based solvents attack copper & brass but also leave your patches a blue-green color so you are never sure if your bore is truly clean of copper. Our aircraft-grade aluminum has the same hardness of brass, it will not embed impurities or harm your bore, and ammonia will not attack it.” As shown below, along with caliber-specific aluminum jags (center), Dewey now offers aluminum thread adaptors (left) and aluminum-shaft brushes (right).

Dewey Aluminum Jags

New Dewey ‘Copper Eliminator’ Cleaning Rods
These new rods have the same nylon coating and handle assembly as Dewey’s standard coated rods, but they feature a chemical-resistant, 8/32 female-threaded, aluminum ferrule. No brush adapters are required. Each rod is supplied with a male-threaded aluminum jag. Dewey charges $39.95 for these rods, but you may find them slightly cheaper at other vendors.

Dewey Copper Eliminator Cleaning Rod

Copper Eliminator Rods are currently offered in two diameters (.22-.26 Cal, or .27+ Cal), and three lengths: 36″, 40″, 44″. Listed rod lengths do NOT include handle assembly. One last note: Dewey cautions users to avoid TM Solution, because this solvent may harm Dewey’s nylon rod-coatings.

Story sourced by Edlongrange.
Permalink Gear Review, New Product 1 Comment »
December 10th, 2012

Save $5.00 on Bryan Litz Books from Applied Ballistics

Bryan Litz, Ballistican for Berger Bullets, is actually a trained rocket scientist, not to mention a skilled long-range shooter. Bryan’s books on Ballistics and Precision Long Range Shooting have been recognized as the leading resources of their kind in print. Now you can save money on Bryan’s highly-regarded books through a special holiday promotion.

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Books

Bryan tells us: “For a limited time, we are taking an additional $5 off the retail price of our titles Applied Ballistics for Long Range Shooting 2nd Ed. (regularly $49.95, $44.95 on sale) and Accuracy and Precision for Long Range Shooting (regularly $34.95, $29.95 on sale). And, by purchasing direct from Applied Ballistics you can get your copy autographed by the author”.

CLICK HERE to ORDER with special holiday pricing on Bryan Litz books.

Here are what others are saying about these books.

“Got my copy of Accuracy and Precision for Long Range Shooting and can’t put it down! Exceptionally well done! Both this and Applied Ballistics for Long-Range Shooting” are definite requirements for all long range shooters!” — Eric K.

“Thanks, Brian. You have opened up a whole new ‘world’ in shooting, for those of us who love shooting and hunting, but don’t have the academic background to really appreciate the intricacies of science.” — Terje N.

Permalink Hot Deals No Comments »
December 10th, 2012

NBRSA Announcements to Members for 2013

NBRSA logoAfter concluding its 2012 Board Meeting, the NBRSA has issued some announcements for its membership. The Fee structure has changed, and Match Directors are requested to submit info on upcoming 2013 Matches. In addition, the NBRSA noted that Long Range Rule Books are now on sale for $5.00. Call (307) 655-7415 to order these Rule Books.

NBRSA Fee Schedule for 2013
Dues and match fees will change beginning January 1, 2013. The new fee structure is designed “to be equitable to everyone”, with adjustments reflecting shipping costs. Normal match fees change to $3 per shooter per day. Annual Fees will be:

  • USA Domestic Annual Members & Clubs: $60
  • CANADIAN Annual Members: $60 + $25 shipping — Total US $85
  • INTERNATIONAL Annual Members: $60 + $60 shipping — Total US $120

2013 Match Schedules and Forms
The NBRSA requests that match directors send in their 2013 match schedules to Regional Directors as soon as possible. This will allow the NBRSA to post schedules online and in Precision Rifleman magazine. Match Directors who require Forms should click the links below.

Memorandums of Agreement (MOAs) | Match Vouchers Forms

News Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink News No Comments »
December 9th, 2012

Tuning Savage Actions Using Action Screw Torque Settings

This article originally appeared in the SAVAGE ACCURACY Blog

Stan Pate is the Captain of Savage’s National Championship F-TR Team. In this article, Stan explains how to adjust the action-screw tension on a three-screw Savage target action to achieve the best accuracy. The procedure described here can be used for any Savage action, including the two-action-screw models. However, the optimal settings for each particular rifle may vary slightly.

Match shooters need to get that extra accuracy edge from our ammunition and firearm. It is easy to get one of the Savage rifles to shoot accurately — even to match standards. If you are looking for that little bit more from your rifle, then please read a method that I have found that works for me. For those of you that are familiar with tuning a receiver (such as a match rimfire action), this article will be nothing new. For the rest of you, this might be new material. The goal here is to find the “sweet spot” for the rifle in relation to the torque settings used on the receiver screws. The proper torque settings [can vary] from rifle to rifle, but they will usually have a noticeable effect on consistent group sizes. A properly-torqued rifle will optimize the “harmonics” of the barreled action using the receiver screws so that the gun delivers peak consistency.

Here is the process I have found that works for me in tuning a Savage rifle receiver to peak accuracy. To use my process you first must already have a load that shoots accurately and consistently in your rifle, and I always use a fouled barrel like I’d be shooting in a match. This process works for me in both the model 10 (two receiver screws), and the model 12 (three receiver screws).

Seat Recoil Lug and Start with Front Action Screw(s)
On the model 12, I will first ensure that the recoil lug is seated securely against the stock by just lightly tightening up the front receiver screw then gently but firmly bumping the butt pad against the floor. Next I will tighten up the front two receiver screws to 30 inch-pounds starting at 20 inch-pounds and working up to the 30 inch-pounds in 5 inch-pound increments, and always tightening the front screw first and then the second screw. Once the front two receiver screws are torqued to the final torque setting, I will set the rear receiver screw to 5 inch-pounds and shoot a 5-shot group [to evaluate accuracy].

Increase Torque Incrementally on Rear Action Screw
After the group is shot and I am satisfied that I called all of the shots as good shots I will allow the rifle to cool off to about the temperature that the fist group was shot at. I will then add 5 inch-pounds to the rear receiver screw and shoot another five-shot group and allow the rifle to cool again. I repeat this process until I have tightened the rear receiver screw to 40 inch-pounds or have seen the groups get smaller and then start getting larger again. Once you have seen the groups decrease and then start to increase in size then you will have found the area of torque to work in. You can then can fine tune this to the exact inch-pound torque settings.

Tuning a Model 10 with Two Receiver Screws
The Savage model 10 action, which has two receiver screws, uses the same process as the three-screw model 12. Measure your group sizes and place the measurements in front of you so that you can see the bell curve showing where your best groups were achieved. NOTE — there may be a better way of doing this and if you should have one, I’d be very interested in hearing it. Good shooting and I hope to see you all on the range. – Stan Pate

This is on the Palma rifle using the torque settings of 30 inch pounds on the front two reciever screws, and 15 inch pounds on the tang screw, it is approximately 1/2″ center to center.
This is my second torque setting which for this rifle and this load is the optimal setting of 30 inch pounds on the front two reciever screws and 25 inch pounds on the tang screw, this group is approximately .180″ center to center.
This is the third torque setting which for this rifle is moving away from the optimal torque setting towards the heavy side of the scale. This torque setting results shows that you will usually see a “bell curve” of accuracy as you move into the optimal torque setting. This group is almost .7″ and the torque setting was 40 inch pounds.

This article was edited for length to appear in the Daily Bulletin.

Permalink Competition, Gunsmithing 15 Comments »
December 9th, 2012

TECH TIP: Smooth Powder Dispensing with Modified Straw

RCBS Dispenser strawHere’s a clever, easy modification for your RCBS ChargeMaster electronic powder dispenser. Many folks use a McDonald’s straw to smooth kernel flow out of the dispensing tube. Forum member Mike S. (aka in2deep) found that, even with a straw in place, he sometimes got clumps, which dropped 5-6 kernels at once, throwing off his dispensed weight.

Mike looked at the situation and ingeniously decided to trim the straw into little v-shaped arms or prongs. This helps to break up the clumps, so the kernels flow out the end of the tube more consistently during the dispense cycle. Mike writes:

Soda Straw Modification
This is a further tweak of the popular soda straw modification as the original mod would still allow Varget powder to collect in the straw and dump sometimes as many as 6 or 8 or even more extra kernels in the pan. It would sometimes signal an overcharge, but even when it didn’t there could be as many as 6+ kernels too high or too low (total spread of 12+).

The little arms (prongs) on the straw tend to separate the kernels into groups of 1 or 2 or 3 and prevents piling and many times the throw is now within 1 or 2 kernels of the desired weight.

RCBS Dispenser straw

Straw Cutting Tips — Mike found the shape/angle of the “arms” is very important. If the cuts are too fine or too course it allows the kernels to collect almost like before but the illustrated angle seems to allow an average of only 2 or 3 kernels per trickle input from the machine. This means that more charges are much closer to the actual desired weight and max kernel variances will be cut in less than half and there will be almost no overthrows.

Credit Boyd Allen for sourcing this tip.
Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip 4 Comments »
December 9th, 2012

Cheap Tricks with 35mm Film Canisters

While many of us now favor digital photography over “old-fashioned” 35mm film, don’t toss those old 35mm film canisters, especially the clear Fuji-type with secure snap-in lids. Small plastic film canisters have a multitude of uses for the shooter and reloader.

Here Are Some of the Things You Can Do with Film Canisters:

1. If you weigh powder charges after throwing them with a manual powder dispenser, throw the charges first into a film canister and then use that to drop the powder into the measuring pan on your scale. The canister will catch every kernel of powder. If you throw charges directly into a weighing pan, powder can sometimes bounce out. Using the film canister will help keep spilled powder off your loading bench and floor.

2. Store extra sets of foam ear-plugs in the canister. You never want to be without ear protection. This editor has four film canisters filled with plugs. Two go in the range kit, one goes in the car’s glove compartment, and a second stays in a lock box I use to transport pistols. This way I never find myself at the range without ear protection.

3. Place your smaller cotton patches in film canisters, marked by caliber. If you use the water-tight Fuji-style canisters, you can even pre-soak the patches with solvent. You can have one canister for wet patches, another for dry patches. That saves time when you’re at the range, and avoids spillage. One caution–some solvents may react with plastic, so test this first before you put a solvent-filled canister in your range kit.

4. Use film canisters to hold your neck bushings, sorted by caliber. With a permanent marking pen, you can mark the side or top of the canister with the bushing sizes, or caliber.

5. Store your favorite Bolt Grease (for rifles) or anti-seize compound (good for pistol slide rails), in the canister. You don’t need to fill it all the way up — a little dab will do ya. We only recommend this with the snap-top Fuji canisters.

6. During transport, Protect your muzzle with canisters. When shipping a rifle or barrel, slip the film canister over the muzzle, then secure it with electrical tape. This will protect the precious crown of a match barrel from dings or damage.

There are countless other uses for 35mm film canisters. We invite readers to respond with their own tips on using these handy containers. If you don’t have some stashed in your workshop already, you can get empties for free at most film processing centers. The clear plastic Fuji canisters are the best — you can see what’s inside and the lids are watertight.

Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip 14 Comments »
December 8th, 2012

Wind Reading Tips for F-Class and Long Range Shooting

by Steven Blair, 2012 California State Long Range F-Open Champion

Assess the Terrain and How the Wind Will Interact with It
Before you begin a match, take a few minutes to look around the range at the terrain, any obstructions, range topography (berms and backstop), and trees, buildings or structures that could affect wind flow over the range. Imagine what might happen if the wind was from the left or right, headwind or tailwind. Depending upon the direction, significant effects may be seen on range. A head or tail wind may ripple across the berms, causing elevation changes, both high and low. A tall side berm, like the east side berm at Ben Avery, may cause turbulence when the wind comes from that direction. Blocking features might shield most of the wind but a break along the range can funnel strong gusts through the gap with no other indications. Take a few notes about the effects of different wind directions and refer to them if the prevailing direction changes. (Tip courtesy Tony Robertson.)

Steven Blair F-Class Wind Tips

Use a Spotting Scope, Even When Shooting a Scoped Rifle
A good spotting scope can “see” mirage much more clearly than even an expensive rifle scope. Take your spotting scope to the line and position it as sling shooters do, close enough to use without much movement. Focus the scope approximately 1/3 of the way down range or where the most significant wind effects are likely to occur. Take a quick look while waiting for pit service, glance at the flags and compare to your scope sight picture. I often see ambiguous indications at the target through the rifle scope, but see a clear indication of wind direction and speed through the spotting scope at the shorter distance. When shooting the Arizona Palma Championship at Ben Avery last weekend, I was scoring while the wind was coming from the east. Shooters up and down the line were out to the left, losing points. Mirage at the target looked moderate and the flags weren’t indicating strong wind. As I focused the spotting scope back, the mirage suddenly looked like it was flowing twice as fast around 500 yards than it was closer or farther. It wasn’t until I realized that the access road cut through the berm there that I understood what was happening. (Tip courtesy Gary Eliseo.)

Steven Blair F-Class Wind Tips

Don’t Over-React to Something That May Be an Anomaly
On ranges with sizable berms, a headwind or tailwind can cause significant elevation problems. It is generally not possible to see or predict when this will occur. When the conditions exist that cause elevation changes and other competitors are experiencing the same problem, the best strategy is to ignore it. Certainly, avoid shooting when the head or tail wind is gusting, the same as you would in a crosswind. But, if you react to random, range-induced elevation changes, the only likely result is to make it worse. Whether the problem is caused by range or ammunition, maintain your waterline hold until you have evidence that something has fundamentally changed.

Steven Blair F-Class Wind Tips

My .284 Shehane will usually require a click or two down during a string as the barrel warms. That is normal and manageable. But, if your shots are just bouncing up and down in the 10 ring, leave it alone. The same is also true of an occasional gust pushing a shot into the 9 ring. If the conditions have not changed and one shot just went out, it may be the result of a random occurrence that was not predictable. (Tip courtesy “School of Hard Knocks”.)

Adjust Spotting Scope Focus and Magnification as Needed to View Mirage vs. Target Details
In F-Class we only need to see mirage, spotters, and scoring disks. That does not take a lot of magnification. My scope is a Nikon 25-75x82mm ED. It is a superb scope for the money and makes it trivial to see minor variations in mirage. It is good to have the high magnification available, and it can always be reduced if necessary. I use different power settings for different situations.

Steven Blair F-Class Wind TipsSetting Magnification Levels
During a match, in very good viewing conditions, I set my spotting scope at 75X, full power. The mirage is more subtle in the morning and greater magnification is needed.

During a match with heavy mirage I set my spotting scope at about 40X. I have no problem seeing mirage, even at this magnification.

When practicing at 300 yards or closer I set my spotting scope at max power (75X) so I can see the little 6mm holes from my 6BR rifle. I usually need to focus back and forth between shots to see both bullet holes and mirage.

Steven Blair, 2012 California State Long Range F-Open Champion, has been shooting since childhood and competing for over 30 years. Before retiring, Steve spent 16 years in Engineering and IT with General Atomics. He has held Engineering and Marketing positions with several firearms companies and worked on projects from pistols to 155mm howitzers.

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills 3 Comments »
December 8th, 2012

Good Deal: MidwayUSA Competition Shooting Mat for $29.99

The MidwayUSA Competition Shooting Mat is on sale for just $29.99, forty bucks off the regular $69.99 price. The $29.99 sale price is good now through December 31, 2012. Sized 67″ Long x 27″ Wide, this mat rolls up into a 6.5-inch diameter “sausage” for transport or storage. While we prefer a wider mat (with more room for ammo boxes and shooting accessories), this mat has many nice features. Grommets on the corners allow the mat to be staked down in high winds. The mat has rubberized elbow and knee pads, and it comes with both a carry handle and a convenient shoulder strap.

prone shooting mat

This would be a useful, inexpensive holiday gift for a junior shooter, or anyone who needs a basic mat for High Power, tactical, or F-Class competition.

  • Material: 600 Denier PVC Coated Polyester
  • Unrolled Dimensions: 67″ Long x 26-3/4″ Wide (not including front flap)
  • Rolled Dimensions: 6-1/2″ Diameter x 26-3/4″ W
  • Elbow Pad Dimensions: 22-1/2″ Long x 25-1/2″ Wide
  • Knee Pad Dimensions: 12-1/2″ Long x 7″ Wide
  • Front Flap Dimensions: Tapers from 27″ to 48-1/2″ wide extending 11-1/2″ from front of mat
  • Padding Thickness: Roughly .25″ thick, plus .335″ thick at the elbow and knee pads
Permalink Hot Deals 1 Comment »
December 7th, 2012

Berger Bullets Rolls Out Redesigned and Enhanced Website

Report by Jeff Williams, AccurateShooter Correspondent
If you’ve visited BergerBullets.com lately, you’ve noticed that Berger Bullets has completely over-hauled and updated its website. The new website has a very handsome, clean layout. It is also faster to load and much easier to navigate. We give Berger an “A” grade for the new website.

Berger bullets

Berger bulletsOn Berger’s home page you’ll find product descriptions, easy-to-use (smart-phone friendly) product buttons, pull-down menus for all four Berger bullet line-ups, recent news items, plus videos. Click “Links” to access a comprehensive list of reloading resources with a directory of shooting association websites. Click the Berger Bulletin tab to read current product status reports, technical articles, and shooting tips.

Redesigned Bullet Info Tables
The bullet product info pages are much easier to read now. Simple tables display all the bullets of a particular type (hunting, target, varmint, and tactical), organized by caliber and weight within calibers. You’ll find BOTH G1 model and G7 model Ballistics coefficients (BCs) for all the bullets in the tables, and recommended twist rates are listed.

Berger bullets

Berger Twist-Rate Stability Calculator
The new Berger website also offers a handy Twist-Rate Stability Calculator that predicts your gyroscopic stability factor (SG) based on mulitiple variables: velocity, bullet length, bullet weight, barrel twist rate, ambient temperature, and altitude. This very cool tool tells you if your chosen bullet will really stabilize in your barrel. LIVE DEMO BELOW — Just enter values in the data boxes and click “Calculate SG”.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 1 Comment »
December 7th, 2012

Eight Stocking Stuffers for Shooters, All Priced under $10.00

Christmas is coming up soon, so today we’re featuring a hand-picked collection of “stocking stuffers” for precision shooters. You can order most of these items online, and if you get your orders in soon, your selections should arrive before December 25th. So as not to bust your holiday budget, all of our selections are priced under $10.00. These items are handy tools that you’ll use over and over again at the range and/or at your loading bench (so you’re allowed to buy them for yourself, even after Christmas).

Gifts $1 to $5 


Surveyors Tape
$1.99
Hood quick estimator group size gauge
Hood Kwik Estimator
$2.50
Edmunds bifocal Magnifier
Bifocal 3X/6X Magnifier
$2.75
Sinclair Barrel Mirage Shade
Barrel Mirage Shade
$4.95

Surveyors’ Tape. Always watch the wind when you shoot. Inexpensive, Day-Glo Surveyors’ Tape (aka “Flagging Tape”), attached to a stake or target frame, makes a good wind indicator. It will flutter even in mild breezes, alerting you to both angle and velocity shifts. This should be part of every range kit. Don’t leave home without it.

Hood Kwik Estimator. Here’s a very handy tool to measure your 6mm groups. Bracket the group within the diverging lines of the Kwik Estimator and you’ll instantly get a good approximation of the actual group size. No more trips to the tool box for calipers. The inexpensive Kwik Estimator fits in a shirt pocket. (Thanks to Boyd Allen for this suggestion.)

Bifocal 3X/6X magnifier. This handy, inexpensive dual-power magnifier is always close at hand on our loading bench, because it helps with so many task. We use a compact magnifier to inspect bullet tips, to check brass chamfers, and inspect the internals of triggers and other parts. Priced at just $2.75, a magnifier like this (or the folding variety) is a “must-have” item for every hand-loader.

Sinclair Barrel Mirage Shade. For high-volume varminters, and competitors who shoot fast in warm weather, a mirage shield is absolutely essential. This prevents hot air rising off the barrel from distorting the image in your scope. The aluminum Sinclair shield can be trimmed to fit, and comes with stick-on Velcro attachments. Two lengths are available: 18″ for short BR barrels, and 24″ for longer barrels.

Gifts $6 to $10 


Dewey Crocogator
$6.50
Ballistol multi-purpose gun lube
Ballistol Aerosol Lube
$8.99
Sinclair Barrel Storage Bag
Sinclair Barrel Bag
$9.95

Sinclair Load Block
$9.99

Dewey Crocogator. The Crocogator tool, with knurled “teeth” at both ends, is simple, inexpensive, and compact. Yet nothing zips though primer-pocket gunk faster or better. Unlike some cutter-tipped primer pocket tools, the Crocogator removes the carbon quick and easy without shaving brass. One end is sized for large primer pockets, the other for small.

Ballistol Aerosol Lube. Ballistol is a versatile, non-toxic product with many uses in the reloading room. We have found it is ideal for lubricating cases for normal full-length sizing. It is clear, not gooey or chalky like other lubes. It is very, very slippery, yet is easy to apply and just as easy to wipe off. As you lube your cases, the Ballistol will also clean powder fouling off the case necks. For heavy-duty case forming and neck expansion, we’ll still use Imperial die wax, but for every-day case sizing, Ballistol is our first choice. It also helps prevent your dies from rusting and it even conditions leather. Ballistol is a favored bore cleaner for Black Powder shooters because it neutralizes acidic powder residues.

Santa Christmas Stocking giftsSinclair Barrel Bag. If you run a switch-barrel rig, or take spare barrels to a big match, this simple but effective barrel bag will protect your valuable steel. The bag is moisture-resistant vinyl on the outside with a soft, quilted interior to protect the barrel’s finish and delicate crown. There are two sizes: one for barrels up to 26 inches, the other for barrels up to 31 inches. Both sizes are priced at $9.95 per bag. That’s cheap insurance for those priceless barrels.

Sinclair ‘Poly’ Loading Block. We’ve tried wood and injection-molded loading trays, and we prefer Sinclair’s white polyethylene loading blocks. They featured chamfered holes properly sized for the particular case you reload. The blocks are heavy enough to be stable on the bench, and the “dishwasher-friendly” material is easy to clean. The standard Poly Loading Block holds 50 cases, while the Competition Loading Block holds 25 cases with a tray for empties. For a bit more money, there’s also a Heavy-Duty 50-case model with an extra-thick 1″ base.

Permalink Gear Review, Reloading 1 Comment »
December 7th, 2012

New ISSF 2013-2016 Rules: Finals Start from Zero, and End in Head to Head Duel for Gold

ISSF Rule ChangesIn November, the ISSF Administrative Council approved new ISSF rules calling for major changes in ISSF and Olympic Shooting Sports events. Starting in 2013, all Finalists will start with zero scores and there will be elimination rounds, ending with a final two-shooter duel for the Gold medal (the loser of the duel gets Silver). The new Finals procedure represents the ISSF’s first major format change since the introduction of finals in 1986. The new Finals format will be used in all 2013 ISSF Championships.

This rules were changed to make shooting events more “spectator-friendly”, attract media coverage, and engage a larger fan base. It is hoped that the new format, ending in a duel, is more appealing and easily understandable. The new ISSF rules contain new Finals formats for all Olympic shooting events mandating that ALL finalists start from zero. This means that qualification scores will not be carried into the Final anymore, making the scoring system immediately understandable for spectators. Furthermore, all Finals feature eliminations, and end with duels between the two best athletes to decide the gold and silver medals. The new 2013 Rules have been published on the ISSF website, ISSF-sports.org.

Other Shooting Rule Changes to Be Implemented
The new ISSF Rules also include the separation of sighting and match firing in 10m and 50m rifle and pistol events, a new position order for 50m Rifle 3-Position events, and a provisional test of decimal scoring for 10m Air Rifle and 50m Prone Rifle events. The Final for the 50m 3-P Rifle event will become a true 3-Positions Final, not a one-position Final like it used to be. And new time limits will require shooters to make more rapid position changes in future 3-position rifle Finals. Both 25m Pistol Finals will use hit-miss scoring to encourage more spontaneous spectator reactions.

ISSF Big Shots Praise Finals Format Changes
“The shooting sport has always been a leading sport in the Olympic movement. And with the new finals we made an important step forward to keep that leading position,” said ISSF President, Mr. Olegario Vazquez Raña.

ISSF Sec. Gen’l Franz Schreiber concurred: “It was time to change….The ISSF has always been open to innovation, and we are proving it once again. All sports must adapt to the digital era of technology and media. The time has come to adopt new [formats] which fulfill these objectives.”

Legendary USA Olympic marksman and ISSF Vice-President Gary Anderson observed that the rule changes will present challenges: “We will have to work hard to make this work. But our sport will benefit from this new, appealing format.”

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December 6th, 2012

Forum Member Shoots 200-26X at 600-Yard Prone Match

At a recent 600-yard High Power prone match in Florida, Forum member Frank Diaz shot a spectacular 200-26X score. He was firing his 6 BRX rifle with sling and scope in the Any Sights/Any Rifle category at the Port Malabar Rifle & Pistol Club. This is a remarkable accomplishment — we have never heard of a higher ‘Any/Any’ score shot at this distance on a 20-round stage with sling support. How do you score twenty-six Xs in a 20-shot match, you may ask? The answer is that, under the NRA rules, a competitor who shoots a perfect score (all 10s in X-Ring for his record shots), can continue to fire until he eventually places a shot outside the X-Ring. So Frank hit 26 Xs in a row. Wow.

Frank reports: “I shot a 200-26X at Port Malabar, FL at 600 yards using sling and scope. The wind was light, moving from Northeast to East at 5 to 10 mph. The gun was a 6mm BRX with 32.8 grains of Varget. My gun features a Barnard action, Brux barrel chambered by Paul Larson, and an H&H prone stock with work done by Alex Sitman (MasterClass Stocks). I [sometimes] shoot this gun with irons but for this match I mounted a Nightforce 12-42″.

Port Malabar Rifle & Pistol ClubThe Port Malabar Rifle & Pistol Club operates the last civilian competition 600-yard rifle range left in Florida. With 122 acres and a dozen ranges, Port Malabar is the largest self-policed shooting club in the state. While the 600-yard range is not open to the public, there are numerous organized events open to shooters from other clubs and locations. The range is located at: 610 Hurley Blvd. SW, Palm Bay, FL 32904.

Port Malabar Rifle & Pistol Club
P.O. Box 060307
Palm Bay Florida, 32906
(321) 956-8300

Permalink Competition 1 Comment »
December 6th, 2012

NRA’s Guns & Gold TV Travels the USA to Value Classic Guns

The NRA’s popular Guns & Gold TV Series returns to The Sportsman Channel for ten (10) new episodes in 2013. Season Two kicks off Monday, January 7th and future episodes of Guns & Gold will air Monday nights at 9:00 pm ET/PT. Guns & Gold was the #1-rated show on The Sportsman Channel in early 2012. This season’s 10 all-new episodes will feature “more guns, cooler guns and weirder guns”.

During Guns & Gold’s new season, NRA National Firearms Museum experts travel around the country, making a circuit of important gun shows (including the NRA Annual Meeting). At each venue, Museum Director Jim Supica and Senior Curator Phil Schreier appraise collectible and unusual firearms brought in by show attendees. Think of this as a PBS-style “Antiques Roadshow”, but with antique and unusual arms as the centerpiece. For more info, visit NRAgunsandgold.com.

NRA Guns and & Gold television

Watch the video below to see a Guns & Gold sample from 2012 covering Teddy Roosevelt and the Winchester Model 1895. Roosevelt loved the 1895. He famously referred to his 1895, chambered in .405 Winchester, as his “Big Medicine” rifle. Did you know T.R. took a crate of 1895s to Africa for his safaris?

Report based on story by Kyle Jillson in NRAblog.com

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December 6th, 2012

Flash-Hole First Aid — Removing Flash Hole Obstructions

Even with high-quality brass from Lapua, Norma, and RWS, occasionally you may find one or two cases per box which have a small flake or obstruction in the flash-hole. This will appear like a thin crescent on one side of the flash hole (see photo). You should inspect ALL new brass before loading to identify any pieces with a partially-obstructed flash hole. It’s a good idea to remove any flake or thin crescent left as an artifact of the flash-hole forming process. Because the flash-hole itself is normally centered and of the correct diameter, it is not necessary to ream the flash-hole to a larger diameter. All you really need to do is remove the small obstruction(s). This can be done quickly with inexpensive tools.

Flash-hole reamer

Use a Small Pin Vise to Remove Flash-Hole Obstructions
Folks have asked if there is a tool that can remove obstructions from a Lapua small, BR-sized flash hole without opening the hole size. The Lapua PPC/BR flash hole is spec’d at 1.5mm, which works out to 0.059055″. Most of the PPC/BR flash-hole uniforming tools on the market use a 1/16″ bit which is nominally 0.0625″, but these often run oversize — up to 0.066″.

If you want to just clear out any obstructions in the flash hole, without increasing the flash hole diameter, you can use an inexpensive “pin vise” with an appropriate drill bit. For $1.00, eHobbyTools.com sells a 1.5mm drill bit, item 79186, that matches the Lapua flash hole exactly. Other vendors offer a #53 pin vise drill bit that measures .0595″ or .060″ (depending or source). An 0.0595″ bit is close enough. You can find pin vises and these small-diameter drill bits at hobby stores.

Pin vises Lapua Flash hole

For quite some time, Sinclair Int’l has sold a similar device for small (PPC and BR-size) flash holes. Like the new 07-3081 unit for large flash holes, the 07-3000 Reamer for small flash holes works from the outside, so it can index off the primer pocket. It reams to .0625″, and also costs $45.99. The standard dimension for Lapua 220 Russian and 6mmBR flash holes is 1.5mm or .0590″. This tool will permit standard-size decapping rods with .0625″ tips to work without binding. However, note that both Forster and Redding normally supply .057″ decapping pins with their PPC and BR dies. So, it is NOT necessary to ream your Lapua BR/PPC flashholes, unless you prefer to do so for uniformity. It IS, however, a good idea to check BR/PPC flash holes for burrs before loading the first time.

AccurateShooter Sinclair Flash Hole Reamer

NOTE: If you purchase either the 07-3081 or 07-3000 Sinclair Flash Hole Reamer tools, we recommend you mic the cutter tip before you process a bunch of cases. Sometimes a tip comes through that is oversize. This will ream the flash holes larger than you may intend.

Permalink Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »
December 5th, 2012

New FNX-45 Pistol — .45 ACP with 15-round Capacity

FNH USA has released a new .45 ACP handgun with a 15-round capacity — the FNX-45. This hammer-fired, DA/SA pistol is a commercial version of the gun FNH developed for the Joint Combat Pistol Program. The new FNX-45 features ambidextrous controls. The standard FNX-45 is offered with a matte black frame and stainless slide, or a khaki frame with blackened stainless slide. For better hand fit, FNX-45s ship with four interchangeable grip backstraps. MSRP for the standard model is $809.00.

FNX-45 pistol FNH

FNH will also offer a Tactical version of the FNX-45. This features high-profile night sights and two mounting bases to accept multiple styles of optional red-dot electronic sights. The Tactical model, shown below, has a longer barrel, which is threaded to accept sound suppressors and compensators. The magazines for the FNX-45 Tactical model also have jumbo baseplates for faster mag swaps.

FNX-45 pistol FNH

“We are pleased to announce the release of the FNX-45″, said Ken Pfau, Senior Vice President of Commercial and Law Enforcement Sales for FNH USA. “This handgun was modeled after the FNP-45 service pistol originally introduced in 2007 under the U.S. Joint Combat Pistol Program.”

Both standard and Tactical models come with a 15-round magazine and a MIL-STD 1913 mounting rail on the underside for lights and lasers. For more information about the FNX-45 or other FN products, visit www.FNHusa.com or the FNH USA Facebook Page.

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December 4th, 2012

Sniper’s Hide Releases Precision Rifle Training DVD

Snipers Hide DVD trainingSniper’s Hide has released its first-ever, full-length DVD: Day One: Precision Rifle Training for the Tactical Shooter. This 91-minute DVD focuses on the fundamentals of marksmanship and is the first in a series being produced by Frank Galli and his crew at SnipersHide.com. Since 2009 Sniper’s Hide has offered subscription-based online training videos from within the Sniper’s Hide forum. The Day One DVD is the next evolution in Sniper’s Hide video-based training. The DVD run-time is 1 hour and 31 minutes, with a heavy emphasis on the basics. Day One Precision Rifle Training for the Tactical Shooter is available now in the Sniper’s Hide Store for $60.00.

Companion “Day One” Digital Book for iPads
Sniper’s Hide also offers a companion Day One interactive digital book for iPad users. This iBook features text, photos, and video instruction with a heavy focus on the fundamentals of marksmanship. Designed to compliment the Day One DVD, the interactive “Day One” iBook features instructional text plus video clips from the Day One DVD. Following the same block of instruction as the DVD, this iBook gives the end user another way to view the instruction. Precision Rifle Basics for the Tactical Shooter for iPads can be purchased for $12.99 from the iBookstore or iTunes store.

Watch Sample Video from DAY ONE: Precision Rifle Training

Snipers Hide DVD training

SnipersHide.com is one of the most popular online communities for tactical-style shooters. The Sniper’s Hide Forum now boasts over 75,000 registered members, and Sniper’s Hide also sponsors major shooting competitions which draw the best tactical shooters in the country.

[haiku url=”http://accurateshooter.net/Video/gallidvdaudio.mp3″]

Click PLAY to hear Frank Galli (aka ‘Lowlight’) TALK about the Day One: Precision Rifle Training DVD.

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