January 6th, 2013

New Nightforce 5-25x56mm FFP Scope with 120 MOA Elevation

Nightforce 5-25x56mm BEAST Scope

Nightforce Optics has created quite a stir in the tactical shooting community with the announcement of its new 5-25x56mm First Focal Plane scope, which it calls the “B.E.A.S.T.”. The news is in the numbers — this new scope offers a whopping 120 MOA of elevation travel, and you get a full 60 MOA travel with each rotation of the turret. That’s right — 60 MOA with one turn. With many modern cartridges you can get to 1200 yards (and maybe farther*) with a single revolution — that eliminates all sorts of user-error issues when dialing back-and-forth between yardages.

Nightforce 5-25x56mm BEAST Scope

This is a first-focal-plane design, so the reticle stays constant relative to the target, allowing ranging at any magnification. The scope is offered with four (4) click-value choices: 1/4 MOA, 1/2 MOA, 0.1 Mil, and 0.2 Mil. Whether you chose MOA clicks or Mil-based clicks, you can get an appropriate reticle because Nightforce offers both the MOAR ranging reticle and the Mil-R ranging reticle. The three other reticle options are: MD2.0, TReMoR, and H59.

Nightforce 5-25x56mm BEAST Scope

Nightforce 5-25x56mm BEAST Scope

The new B.E.A.S.T. 5-25x56mm Nightforce has a mounting length of 5.92″ and weighs just 39 ounces. If you need illumination for low-light work, you’ll like the new B.E.A.S.T. scope. It offers external-control digital illumination with Unique i4F™ four-function brightness control. Other features are listed below.

Nightforce 5-25x56mm BEAST Scope

DOWNLOAD Nightforce PDF Spec Sheet for 5-25x56mm B.E.A.S.T. Scope.

Nice Scope with a Beastly Price
Nightforce says that “B.E.A.S.T.” stands for “Best Example of Advance Scope Technology” — some marketing guy’s bright idea we suppose. Perhaps “B.E.A.S.T.” better signifies “BEAST of a price”. This scope, with either MIL-R or MOAR reticles, costs an astounding $3,298.00! You can build a pretty darn good custom rifle, all premium components, for less than that!

*We used JBM Ballistics to plot the trajectory of a .308-caliber 168gr Berger Match Target BT launched with a 2800 fps muzzle velocity (sea level with 59° temp). Starting with a 100-yard zero, JBM calculates 52.5 MOA drop at 1200 yards and 62.6 MOA drop at 1300 yards.
Permalink New Product, Optics 6 Comments »
January 6th, 2013

New Precision Shooting Grid Target from Switzerland

100 Zero Swiss Offset TargetForum member Florian from Switzerland (SimplyRight.ch) has created an interesting new grid target for precision practice work.

The concept behind the target is to allow a marksman to shoot a string of shots (with the same hold) without obliterating his aiming point. Florian’s Swiss Offset Target does this by separating the point of aim from point of impact (POI). On this target, POI is 10 cm (approx. 4″) over to the left.

We’ve found that Florian’s Offset Target is also very good for precise long-range shooting. At 600 yards and beyond, the big black diamond (12 cm or 4.72″ from point to point) provides a nice big aiming center. You can align your vertical and horizontal crosshairs to intersect the points of the diamonds (with intersection of crosshairs in white center of black diamond). That gives you a very precise sight picture. Then you can see your bullet holes appear “in the white” to the left side of the target. At long range it’s much easier to see holes “in the white”. And the grid lines let you gauge group size from afar.

100 Zero Swiss Offset Target

CLICK HERE to download Swiss Offset Target as a PDF file
CLICK HERE to Read Florian’s Instructions

More Uses for the Swiss Offset Grid Target
We’ve also found that this target lets you do a “quick and easy” Box Test with your scope. The target is designed as a precise grid. Starting at the lower left corner, you can click up X clicks, then right Y clicks, then down X clicks, then back left Y clicks, to see how your scope tracks. Also, since Florian’s target is set up with 1 CM grid boxes, this target is ideal for testing the true click values for metric-based scopes. Thanks to Florian for developing this Swiss Offset Grid Target. You may find new uses for it that we haven’t thought about yet!

How to use the Swiss Offset Target:

1. Print the target as a PDF file. Check if the size is correct by measuring the space between the two little circles’ centers. This should be 10cm (4″). (One square = 1cm).
2. Place the target horizontally at 100 meters for metric scope or 100 yards for inches and MOA scope. (We suggest using a small contractor’s level to ensure the target is mounted straight)
3. With your already-zeroed rifle, put in the amount of clicks needed to shoot 4 inches left at 100 yards (or 10cm on the left at 100 meters). Write down the amount of clicks it takes to move the point of impact the correct amount.
4. Aim at the circle inside the black diamond and shoot. (Your group should cover the small black circle at left (between the two gray columns).
5. Adjust your scope if needed.
6. Confirm your accuracy and click values by clicking back right and shooting (one time) at the virgin circle in the middle of the diamond.

Permalink Shooting Skills No Comments »
January 6th, 2013

Gear Review: Paul Becigneul Case Turning Motor and Collet

On his Rifleman’s Journal website, German Salazar has done a nice review of Forum member Paul Becigneul’s Case Turning Motor. READ Full Review on RiflemansJournal.com

Becigneul Case Turning Motor, by German Salazar
Although there have been a variety of similar devices and ‘case lathes’ offered for sale in the past, they’ve been priced fairly high. Paul’s unit is reasonably priced ($220.00) and built like a tank. The motor turns at about 180 rpm which is just right for neck turning. What’s really nice is that the motor has enough torque to hold its speed throughout the whole operation and a/c power to run all day long!

paul Becigneul Rotary Power supply

The unit’s design is fairly straight-forward: a surplus electric motor turns a Forster case-holding collet. Paul makes a nice knurled collar to open and close the collet.Power is controlled by a household type wall switch attached to a long cabe. The whole assembly is mounted on a nice hardwood base.

Video of Paul Becigneul’s Case Turning Motor in Use

In operation, it works very well. The collet has enough clamping power to hold the case after a quick hand-tightening, no wrench is needed (although you can use one if you are so inclined). A quarter turn of the collar opens the collet and a quick turn of the wrist tightens it back up. As with any powered case neck turning device, the case wobbles a bit as it turns. This doesn’t matter a bit as the turning cutter is held in your hand (which is free to move) and the cutter’s arbor is the actual alignment device. The wobble is the same or less than what I had using a power screwdriver with a K&M holder.

For more information, email Paul Becigneul via: pbike4466 [at] directv.net. In 2012, the basic unit cost $220.00 each collet was $10 and shipping is $20 to most U.S. locations.

Editor’s Comment: In the video, Paul uniforms case flash-holes with a Lyman tool (from the inside) and then uniforms primer pockets (from the outside) with a K&M tool. While we do believe that flash-holes should be inspected to ensure there are no obstructions or flakes blocking the hole, we have not found that flash-hole or primer-pocket uniforming produced measurable improvements in accuracy with Lapua 6mmBR brass. In fact, in our tests using a manual K&M flash-hole uniformer, ES/SD actually got worse after the flash-holes were “uniformed”.

Keep in mind also that many deburring tools for 0.059 (PPC-size) flash-holes actually over-cut substantially, reaming the holes to as wide as 0.068″. The Lapua PPC/BR flash hole is spec’d at 1.5mm, which works out to 0.059055″. Most of the PPC/BR flash-hole uniforming tools on the market use a 1/16″ bit which is nominally 0.0625″, but these often run oversize — up to 0.067″. If you like to uniform your primer pockets, be our guest (this can be useful with lesser-quality brass). But before pocket-uniforming dozens of cases, you might do a comparison test (by shooting uniformed vs. un-uniformed ammo) to see whether this operation actually improves accuracy with the brass you are using.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product, Reloading 3 Comments »