May 10th, 2013

NSSF Splits with Reed, Seeks New SHOT Show Management

NSSF Shot Show ReedThe National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), the trade association for the shooting industry, is severing its ties with British-based Reed Exhibitions. On May 9th, NSSF announced that it has reached an agreement with Reed Exhibitions to terminate the contract the parties had for the management of the SHOT Show. Accordingly, effective immediately, Reed Exhibitions will no longer be manager and producer of the SHOT Show. NSSF is now actively engaged in the process of identifying a new show management company to manage and produce the SHOT Show beginning with the 2014 SHOT Show in Las Vegas.

The NSSF stated: “Reed Exhibitions provided excellent service to NSSF and the customers of the SHOT Show for more than three decades, however, the company’s decision to restrict the sale of certain types of firearms this year at its consumer hunting and fishing show — an event unrelated to NSSF and the SHOT Show — was in conflict with NSSF’s mission to serve the shooting sports industry. As a result, both organizations decided it was in the best interest of the SHOT Show to end their relationship.”

Reed Exhibitions had banned AR-platform rifles and other semi-automatic, mag-fed firearms from the 2013 Eastern Sports and Outdoor Show (ESOS) in Pennsylvania. As a result, consumers complained and many exhibitors boycotted the show. Ultimately, the ESOS was postponed. (Related ESOS Story)

The SHOT Show — the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show — is owned and sponsored by NSSF. It is the largest and most comprehensive trade show for all professionals involved with the shooting sports, hunting and law enforcement industries. The 2014 SHOT Show will be held January 14-17 at the Sands Expo and Convention Center in Las Vegas.

Permalink News 3 Comments »
May 10th, 2013

Federal and CCI Allocate 20,000,000 Rounds for Youth Shooting

CCI Federal Ammunition rimfireIn cooperation with the Youth Shooting Sports Alliance (YSSA), Federal Premium Ammunition and sister company CCI have allocated 20 million rounds of rimfire ammunition to youth shooting sports programs. This will be sold at a discounted price, well below market value. The Boy Scouts of America will receive ten million .22 LR shells, and another ten million will be sent to other organizations. The Federal and CCI rimfire ammo will ship directly to the Boys Scouts of America, 4-H Shooting Sports, Scholastic Steel Challenge, and other qualified youth organizations. The ammo will ship later this month to ensure adequate supplies for summer camps and youth training programs.

Boy Scouts practice at the Williamson Shooting Sports Complex, part of the Mabee Scout Reservation (OK)

Federal Premium and CCI have been supporting youth outreach programs for decades. The latest allocation of 20 Million .22 LR rounds supports the need for affordable and reliable ammunition. “We work very closely with several youth organizations who promote the youth shooting sports,” said Federal Premium Conservation Manager Ryan Bronson. “Their efforts are very important to us, and always have been. Many of them rely on rimfire ammunition to educate and teach tomorrow’s hunters and shooting sports enthusiasts. The current demand has put a strain on their ability to continue to operate. We hope this special allocation will ease some of the pressure, and keep our young people doing what they love — shooting and hunting.”

4-H Shooting Sports Federal Ammunition

Permalink Shooting Skills 5 Comments »
May 10th, 2013

Large vs. Small Flash Holes in .308 Win Brass

Conventional .308 Winchester brass has a large primer pocket with a large, 0.080″-diameter flash hole. In 2010, Lapua began producing special edition .308 Win “Palma” brass that has a small primer pocket and a small flash hole, sized 1.5mm (.059″) in diameter. Tests by U.S. Palma Team members showed that the small-flash-hole .308 brass possibly delivers lower Extreme Spread (ES) and Standard Deviation (SD) with some bullet/powder/primer combinations. All things being equal, a lower ES should reduce vertical dispersion at long range.

Why Might a Small Flash Hole Work Better?
The performance of the small-flash-hole .308 brass caused some folks to speculate why ES/SD might be improved with a smaller flash hole. One theory (and it’s just a theory) is that the small flash hole creates more of a “jet” effect when the primer fires. German Salazar (Rifleman’s Journal Editor) sought to find out, experimentally, whether this theory is correct. German explained: “During one of the many internet forum discussions of these cases, Al Matson (AlinWA) opined that the small flash hole might cause the primer flash to be propagated forward more vigorously. In his words, it should be like shooting a volume of water through a smaller nozzle, resulting in a flash that reaches further up the case. Now that kind of comment really sparked my curiosity, so I decided to see what I could see.”

More Primer Testing by Salazar
You can read more about this test and other primer experiments on RiflemansJournal.com.

Salazar Primer Tests: Small Rifle Primer Study | Large Rifle Primer Study

Large and Small Flash Hole .308 Cases — But Both with Small Primer Pockets
To isolate the effect of flash hole diameter alone, German set up a test with the two types of .308 case that have a small primer pocket: Remington BR brass with a 0.080″ flash hole and Lapua Palma brass with a 0.062″ flash hole. NOTE: German reamed the Lapua brass to 0.062″ with a Sinclair uniforming tool, so it was slightly larger than the 0.059″ factory spec. The Remington brass has a .22 BR headstamp as this brass was actually meant to be re-formed into .22 BR or 6 BR before there was factory brass available for those cartridges.

.308 Winchester Flash Holes

German set up his primer testing fixture, and took photos in low light so you can see the propagation of the primer “blast” easily. He first tested the Remington 7 1/2 primer, a primer known for giving a large flame front. German notes: “I thought that if there was a ‘nozzle effect’ from the small flash hole, this primer would show it best. As you can see from the photos, there might be a little bit of a flash reduction effect with this primer and the small flash hole, the opposite of what we expected, but it doesn’t appear to be of a significant order of magnitude.”

Remington BR case, 0.080″ Flash Hole, Remington 7.5 Primer.

Lapua Palma case, 0.062″ Flash Hole, Remington 7.5 Primer.

Next German tested the Wolf .223 primer, an unplated version of the Small Rifle Magnum that so many shooters use. German notes: “This is a reduced flame-front (low flash) primer which has proven itself to be very accurate and will likely see a lot of use in the Lapua cases. With this primer, I couldn’t detect any difference in the flash produced by the small flash hole versus the large flash hole”.

Remington BR case, 0.080″ Flash Hole, Wolf .223 Primer.

Palma case, 0.062″ Flash Hole, Wolf 223 Primer.

German tells us: “I fired five or six of each primer to get these images, and while there is always a bit of variance, these are an accurate representation of each primer type and case type. You can draw your own conclusions from all this, I’m just presenting the data for you. I don’t necessarily draw any conclusions as to how any combination will shoot based on the pictures.”

Results of Testing
Overall, looking at German’s results, one might say that the smaller diameter of the small flash hole does not seem to have significantly changed the length or size of the primer flame front. There is no discernible increased “jet effect”.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »