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May 21st, 2014

Range Tip: How to Avoid Blasting Your Chronograph

There is nothing more frustrating (or embarassing) than sending a live round into your expensive new chronograph. As the photo below demonstrates, with most types of chronographs (other than the barrel-hung Magnetospeed), you can fatally injure your expensive chrono if it is not positioned precisely.

chronograph tip placement

When setting up a chrono, we always unload the rifle, remove the bolt and bore-sight to ensure that the path of the bullet is not too low. When bore-sighting visually, set up the rifle securely on the sandbags and look through the bore, breech to muzzle, lining up the barrel with your aim point on the target. Then (during an appropriate cease-fire), walk behind the chronograph. Looking straight back through the “V” formed by the sky-screens, you should be able to see light at the end of the barrel if the gun is positioned correctly. You can also use an in-chamber, laser bore-sighter to confirm the visual boresighting (see photo).

Laser boresighter chronograph

Adjust the height, angle and horizontal position of the chronograph so the bullet will pass through the middle of the “V” below the plastic diffusers, no less than 5″ above the light sensors. We put tape on the front sky-screen supports to make it easier to determine the right height over the light sensors.

Use a Test Backer to Confirm Your Bullet Trajectory
You can put tape on the support rods about 6″ up from the unit. This helps you judge the correct vertical height when setting up your rifle on the bags. Another trick is to hang a sheet of paper from the rear skyscreen and then use a laser boresighter to shine a dot on the paper (with the gun planted steady front and rear). This should give you a good idea (within an inch or so) of the bullet’s actual flight path through the “V” over the light sensors. Of course, when using a laser, never look directly at the laser! Instead shine the laser away from you and see where it appears on the paper.

chronograph set-up

Alignment of Chronograph Housing
Make sure the chrono housing is parallel to the path of the bullet. Don’t worry if the unit is not parallel to the ground surface. What you want is the bullet to pass over both front and rear sensors at the same height. Don’t try to set the chrono height in reference to the lens of your scope–as it sits 1″ to 2″ above your bore axis. To avoid muzzle blast interference, set your chronograph at least 10 feet from the end of the muzzle (or the distance recommended by the manufacturer).

chronograph laser sky screens

Rifles with Elevated Iron Sights
All too often rookie AR15 shooters forget that AR sights are positioned roughly 2.4″ above the bore axis (at the top of the front sight blade). If you set your bullet pass-through point using your AR’s front sight, the bullet will actually be traveling 2.4″ lower as it goes through the chrono. That’s why we recommend bore-sighting and setting the bullet travel point about 5-8″ above the base of the sky-screen support shafts. (Or the vertical distance the chronograph maker otherwise recommends). NOTE: You can make the same mistake on a scoped rifle if the scope is set on very tall rings, so the center of the cross-hairs is much higher than the bore axis line.

Laser boresighter chronograph

TARGET AIM POINT: When doing chrono work, we suggest you shoot at a single aiming point no more than 2″ in diameter (on your target paper). Use that aiming point when aligning your chrono with your rifle’s bore. If you use a 2″ bright orange dot, you should be able to see that through the bore at 100 yards. Using a single 2″ target reduces the chance of a screen hit as you shift points of aim. If you shoot at multiple target dots, place them in a vertical line, and bore sight on the lowest dot. Always set your chron height to set safe clearance for the LOWEST target dot, and then work upwards only.

Other Chronograph Tips from Forum Members:

When using a chronograph, I put a strip of masking tape across the far end of the skyscreens about two-thirds of the way up. This gives me a good aiming or bore-sighting reference that’s well away from the pricey bits. I learned that one the hard way. — German Salazar

A very easy and simple tool to help you set up the chronograph is a simple piece of string! Set your gun (unloaded of course) on the rest and sight your target. Tie one end of the string to the rear scope ring or mount, then pull the string along the barrel to simulate the bullet path. With the string showing the bullet’s path, you can then easily set the chronograph’s placement left/right, and up/down. This will also let you set the chrono’s tilt angle and orientation so the sensors are correctly aligned with the bullet path. — Wayne Shaw

If shooting over a chrono from the prone position off a bipod or similar, beware of the muzzle sinking as recoil causes the front of the rifle to drop. I “killed” my first chronograph shooting off a gravel covered firing point where I’d not given enough clearance to start with and an inch or two drop in the muzzle caused a bullet to clip the housing. — Laurie Holland

Permalink Optics, Tech Tip 5 Comments »
May 21st, 2014

Fun by the Barrel — 12,500 Rounds in One Big Steel Drum

Barrel Federal drum 5.56 roundsWhat’s more fun that a barrel of monkeys? Well a barrel of ammo of course. Here’s an item for the man who has everything, or maybe the prepper who needs enough 5.56x45mm ammo to defeat a horde of zombies, plus their undead friends and relatives. For a mere $5999.99 you can get a barrel containing 12,500 rounds of Federal 5.56x45mm 62gr “Green Tip” ammunition. No joke — this is a real item offered for sale by Grafs.com. When you’re not shooting, your ammo barrel can do double duty as a handy side-table in your living room or man-cave. Just the thing to hold a plate of snacks and your favorite beverage.

In all seriousness, this is impressive Mil-Spec FMJ ammunition right off the production line. The 62-grain green-tipped bullets feature a hardened steel penetrator core. The boxer-primed cases are fully reloadable (though the miltary primer crimps would have to be removed). The ammo is delivered in a heavy-duty steel drum, with steel clamp-on lid with rubber seal. Each container is plastic-lined and packed (from the factory) with dessicant pouches for long term storage.

Barrel Federal drum 5.56 rounds

NOTE: In some jurisdictions there may be restrictions on this product (based on the quantity of rounds or other factors). Check your local laws and regulations.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 3 Comments »
May 20th, 2014

Zombies are Coming to the Heartland This Month

To be honest, we’re not sure how we feel about the whole zombie-theme marketing efforts in the gun industry. However, if you’re into green-tipped bullets, and blasting replicas of the undead, then get ready for the biggest Zombie-themed shooting match of the year. Hornady’s epic Zombie in the Heartland Pandemic is two weeks away. This event will take place May 30 – June 1, 2014 at the Heartland Public Shooting Park in Grand Island, Nebraska. The Pandemic traditionally has a rich prize table worth over $150,000. Prize include pistols, rifles, shotguns, scopes, AR uppers, gun parts, and gear of all kinds. Get more info (and watch videos from last year) at www.ZombiesintheHeartland.com.

Zombie Hornady Heartland Pandemic

Zombie Hornady Heartland Pandemic

Thanks to Hornady and other sponsors, the Pandemic is a veritable theme park for shootists, with many fun stages and innovative targets. Many new and reactive zombie targets have been developed specifically for this match. The use of paper zombie targets has been minimized. Shotguns, rifles and handguns will be used on most stages.

Zombie Hornady Heartland Pandemic

Zombie Hornady Heartland Pandemic

In 2013, there were 10 Competitive Stages and 5 Sidematch Stages. Match directors expect at least the same number of stages for Pandemic 2014. Each presents a different shooting challenge, and a different threat. View the Zombie Guide Page for general information and firearms classifications.

2014 Zombie Pandemic General Guide | 2014 Zombie Pandemic Rules

Permalink Competition, News 6 Comments »
May 20th, 2014

NSSF Provides Grants for Collegiate Target Shooting Programs

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) will award $100,000 in grants to public and private colleges for start-ups of new target-shooting clubs and teams. Up to $10,000 will be awarded to each qualifying school. Schools receiving grants range from large universities to community colleges. In the last grant session, 20 colleges received program start-up funding, including the University of Colorado at Boulder, North Idaho College, Slippery Rock University, Concordia College, Middlebury College and Wichita State University, to name several.

NSSF College GrantsThe grants are provided through NSSF’s Collegiate Shooting Sports Initiative, which has assisted more than 75 schools with building competitive and recreational shooting programs through more than $1 million in support. The program is credited with helping to spur growth in collegiate target shooting across the country.

Successful target shooting programs have developed from modest beginnings — sometimes involving just several enthusiastic students, a dedicated coach and the NSSF grant. “Students and coaches provide the passion, NSSF provides the seed funding,” said NSSF Manager of Shooting Promotions Zach Snow.

Visit www.nssf.org/college to learn about grant opportunities for college shotgun, rifle or pistol teams/clubs. The NSSF also offers a PDF Brochure on Establishing a Collegiate Shooting Program. This includes sample By-laws and Rules.

Permalink News No Comments »
May 19th, 2014

How to Avoid a ‘Train Wreck’ at Your Next Shooting Match

train wreck Bryan Litz shooting tips ballistics

Two months ago, the Daily Bulletin featured Six Shooting Tips by Bryan Litz. That article was hugely popular with our Bulletin readers and Facebook fans. In that article, as his Competition Tip Number Three, Bryan told readers to “Actively avoid major train wrecks”. In other words, you must avoid the big disasters (such as equipment failures) that can ruin a whole match. In this follow-up article, Bryan illustrates the types of “train wrecks” that commonly befall competitors, and he explains how to avoid these “unmitigated disasters”.

Urban Dictionary “Train Wreck” Definition: “A total @#$&! disaster … the kind that makes you want to shake your head.”

train wreck Bryan Litz shooting tips ballisticsTrain Wrecks (and How to Avoid Them)
by Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics LLC.

Success in long range competition depends on many things. Those who aspire to be competitive are usually detail-oriented, and focused on all the small things that might give them an edge. Unfortunately it’s common for shooters lose sight of the big picture — missing the forest for the trees, so to speak.

Consistency is one of the universal principles of successful shooting. The tournament champion is the shooter with the highest average performance over several days, often times not winning a single match. While you can win tournaments without an isolated stellar performance, you cannot win tournaments if you have a single train wreck performance. And this is why it’s important for the detail-oriented shooter to keep an eye out for potential “big picture” problems that can derail the train of success!

Train wrecks can be defined differently by shooters of various skill levels and categories. Anything from problems causing a miss, to problems causing a 3/4-MOA shift in wind zero can manifest as a train wreck, depending on the kind of shooting you’re doing.

Below is a list of common Shooting Match Train Wrecks, and suggestions for avoiding them.

1. Cross-Firing. The fastest and most common way to destroy your score (and any hopes of winning a tournament) is to cross-fire. The cure is obviously basic awareness of your target number on each shot, but you can stack the odds in your favor if you’re smart. For sling shooters, establish your Natural Point of Aim (NPA) and monitor that it doesn’t shift during your course of fire. If you’re doing this right, you’ll always come back on your target naturally, without deliberately checking each time. You should be doing this anyway, but avoiding cross-fires is another incentive for monitoring this important fundamental. In F-Class shooting, pay attention to how the rifle recoils, and where the crosshairs settle. If the crosshairs always settle to the right, either make an adjustment to your bipod, hold, or simply make sure to move back each shot. Also consider your scope. Running super high magnification can leave the number board out of the scope’s field view. That can really increase the risk of cross-firing.

2. Equipment Failure. There are a wide variety of equipment failures you may encounter at a match, from loose sight fasteners, to broken bipods, to high-round-count barrels that that suddenly “go south” (just to mention a few possibilities). Mechanical components can and do fail. The best policy is to put some thought into what the critical failure points are, monitor wear of these parts, and have spares ready. This is where an ounce of prevention can prevent a ton of train wreck. On this note, if you like running hot loads, consider whether that extra 20 fps is worth blowing up a bullet (10 points), sticking a bolt (DNF), or worse yet, causing injury to yourself or someone nearby.

train wreck Bryan Litz shooting tips ballistics

3. Scoring/Pit Malfunction. Although not related to your shooting technique, doing things to insure you get at least fair treatment from your scorer and pit puller is a good idea. Try to meet the others on your target so they can associate a face with the shooter for whom they’re pulling. If you learn your scorer is a Democrat, it’s probably best not to tell Obama jokes before you go for record. If your pit puller is elderly, it may be unwise to shoot very rapidly and risk a shot being missed (by the pit worker), or having to call for a mark. Slowing down a second or two between shots might prevent a 5-minute delay and possibly an undeserved miss.

train wreck Bryan Litz shooting tips ballistics4. Wind Issues. Tricky winds derail many trains. A lot can be written about wind strategies, but here’s a simple tip about how to take the edge off a worse case scenario. You don’t have to start blazing away on the command of “Commence fire”. If the wind is blowing like a bastard when your time starts, just wait! You’re allotted 30 minutes to fire your string in long range slow fire. With average pit service, it might take you 10 minutes if you hustle, less in F-Class. Point being, you have about three times longer than you need. So let everyone else shoot through the storm and look for a window (or windows) of time which are not so adverse. Of course this is a risk, conditions might get worse if you wait. This is where judgment comes in. Just know you have options for managing time and keep an eye on the clock. Saving rounds in a slow fire match is a costly and embarrassing train wreck.

5. Mind Your Physical Health. While traveling for shooting matches, most shooters break their normal patterns of diet, sleep, alcohol consumption, etc. These disruptions to the norm can have detrimental effects on your body and your ability to shoot and even think clearly. If you’re used to an indoor job and eating salads in air-conditioned break rooms and you travel to a week-long rifle match which keeps you on your feet all day in 90-degree heat and high humidity, while eating greasy restaurant food, drinking beer and getting little sleep, then you might as well plan on daily train wrecks. If the match is four hours away, rather than leaving at 3:00 am and drinking five cups of coffee on the morning drive, arrive the night before and get a good night’s sleep.”

Keep focused on the important stuff. You never want to lose sight of the big picture. Keep the important, common sense things in mind as well as the minutia of meplat trimming, weighing powder to the kernel, and cleaning your barrel ’til it’s squeaky clean. Remember, all the little enhancements can’t make up for one big train wreck!

train wreck Bryan Litz shooting tips ballistics

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills 4 Comments »
May 19th, 2014

Our Shooters’ Forum Surpasses 25,000 Registered Members

AccurateShooter.com Shooters Forum25,000+ members and counting! The AccurateShooter.com Shooters’ Forum hit a major milestone on May 18, 2014. We surpassed 25,000 registered members. If you have considered joining our Forum, but haven’t done so yet, there’s no better time than now.

As a Shooters’ Forum member, you can exchange ideas with other serious shooters. Sell your gear through our FREE Forum Classifieds. You can get valuable advice on shooting and reloading from top shooters such as National Champions Larry Bartholome, Sam Hall, and Derek Rodgers. Get long-range advice from Ballistics Guru Bryan Litz and past F-Class Team Captain Shiraz Balolia. As well, many top tool-makers and barrel-makers visit the Forum regularly, such as Dave Kiff (PT&G), Frank Green (Bartlein Barrels), and John Perkins (21st Century Shooting).

AccurateShooter.com Shooters Forum

    Benefits for Registered Shooters’ Forum Members

  • FREE Classified Ads for Forum Members.
  • Forum Members Get Advanced Notice of Special Offers.
  • Specialty Sub-boards for Reloading and Gunsmithing.
  • Gear Talk Section with Hundreds of User Gear Evaluations.
  • Special Area for Varmint and Game Hunters.
  • Leading Accuracy Forum with High “Signal to Noise Ratio”.

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May 19th, 2014

CMP Awards $160,000 in College Scholarships

CMP ScholarshipsHere’s “feel-good” story for Monday. The Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) has handed out $160,000 in scholarship awards to graduating high school students who are active shooters. It’s great to see this kind of support for the next generation of marksmen.

Report By Ashley Brugnone, CMP Writer/Editor
In mid-April, Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) board members and staff sifted through a slew of CMP scholarship applications to determine which young scholar marksmen would receive CMP support for the coming academic year. After careful review, the CMP awarded monetary donations to over half of its scholarship applicants.

A total of 233 applications were received by CMP Headquarters for the 2014-2015 term – the most in the scholarship’s history. With 194 accepted and 160 awarded, the CMP granted a total of $160,000 from its scholarship fund. The $1,000 CMP Scholarships are available to graduating high school JROTC, 4-H, and other junior shooting club members.

CMP ScholarshipsScholarship committee members review applications. Boxes upon boxes of applications were considered carefully to determine who would receive the $1,000 scholarships.

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May 18th, 2014

How .22 LR Ammunition is Made

Where did all the .22 LR ammunition go? Why are the prices so high? Why can’t the rimfire ammo-makers step up production? Across the country, firearm owners are asking these questions, and demanding answers.

Part of the explanation comes down to production capacity. America’s rimfire ammo production facilities are already running at full capacity. There is no easy way in increase production. In the video below, the crew from Shooting USA Television visits the ATK production facility in Lewiston, Idaho. This plant can produce 4,000,000 rounds of CCI rimfire ammo in one 24-hour period. This informative video shows the complete process of rimfire ammunition production from start to finish.


YouTube Video Link: http://youtu.be/t5qMsmucXhI.

This is a ‘must-watch’ video that reveals some very interesting things. Did you know that 1200 cases (in one large tray) are filled with powder in a single operation? (See 05:45 mark). Likewise, bullets are also lined up in a matching 1200-count tray (See 6:00 mark). This way 1200 bullets can be seated into 1200 rimfire cases in one efficient procedure.

ATK rimfire .22LR ammunition ammo Lewiston, Idaho

ATK rimfire .22LR ammunition ammo Lewiston, Idaho

When you watch the video, and see the complex, expensive machinery involved, you’ll realize that it’s no easy thing to increase rimfre ammo production. The rimfire plants are already running at full capacity. To produce significantly greater quantities of .22 LR ammunition, manufacturers would have to make huge capital investments.

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo 12 Comments »
May 18th, 2014

Creedmoor Sports Will Be Producing Match-Grade Ammunition

Creedmoor Sports will be producing high-quality loaded ammunition very soon. This will be crafted with top-quality bullets, and premium-grade Lapua brass. General Manager Dennis DeMille tells us: “We received four pallets of brass today and we have 13,005 pounds of powder waiting for production.”

Here’s a preview of what will be on the market very soon:

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

Oh, the beauty of it — all that Lapua brass. From Finland with love….

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

What does 13,005 pounds (6.5 tons) of powder look like? That would last most reloaders a few seasons. Hoarders, eat your hearts out….

Creedmoor Sports Ammunition Powder Anniston Alabama

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 4 Comments »
May 17th, 2014

IBS Match Report: 28th Annual Boop Memorial Group Shoot

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt
Click photo for full-screen image suitable for desktop wall-paper.

Field Report by Jeff Stover, IBS President
In IBS-land you know that spring has sprung when the Memorial Shoot at Weikert, PA comes along. This year was the 28th edition which honors the memories of Nate Boop and Rich Altemus. These two gentlemen started the benchrest program at the Union County Sportsmen’s Club. This is one of the finest ranges you will find anywhere in the country. Both the range itself and its setting are world-class.

Boop Shoot Match Results Summary (.XLS File) | Boop Shoot Top 10 Equipment List (.XLS File)

This year 42 shooters hit the benches at the Weikert range. Saturday’s 100-yard targets were shot in somewhat tricky, but shootable conditions — attested by four teen Aggs. Shooters enjoyed the readable conditions on Saturday but the 200-yard stage on Sunday was another matter — with strong breezes that switched on a thin dime. Red with tails out for 10 seconds, then green with tails out for 8 seconds. Then there was a nice mix of both — with tails erect all around. Some of us love to shoot tailwinds, which were there for a few fleeting moments. But there is a lot of target real estate — over an inch — between a tailwind with a wee bit of green and a tiny smidge of red.

Though Weikert is a gorgeous range, it has one drawback. The central Pennsylvania countryside only allowed for an east-facing range. So, on a sunny day, the first three targets or so are shot with most shooters hanging blue tarps from the range roof to block the sun. This works well and does not inhibit small groups.

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt
Curtis Nelson lines up for first shot, with blue tarp sun shade in place.

The Light Varmint 100-yard stage looked to be all Harley Baker, one of the newest inductees into the U.S. Benchrest Hall of Fame. Harley arrives at any match with impeccably prepared equipment tuned to a knife’s edge. He is tough to beat at any range. He was cruising to yet another Agg win, with Smiley Hensley pretty far behind. To finish off with a flourish, Harley nailed a very nice .190 on his last target.

Many times at the last match of an Aggregate, shooters will banter, “last chance to be a hero”. It is so trite as to not get much reaction from the line. Well, some days a hero does emerge. Smiley shot a .071″ group in Match 5 to win the LV 100 Aggregate with a .1902. Harley settled for a flat .2 and second place. Smiley may have won the battle, but not the war, as we shall see.

Boop Memorial Shoot PeinhardtBoop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt

Most Shooters Use 10.5-pounders Even in Heavy Varmint Class
In the Heavy Varmint class shooters could be shouldering a 13.5-pound rifle. Most, however, stick to their 10.5-pound Sporters (a Light Varmint rifle with a 6mm bore) for an entire weekend. Many times in the loading area you’ll hear, “what are we shooting?” Yes, there a few shooters that will pull out a favored “real” Heavy Varmint, but that is pretty rare these days.

The competition in Heavy Varmint 100 was pretty fierce. Small groups were shot. Teen Aggs were possible. Al Auman shot a fine .1808 to win the Agg. Other Aggregates under 0.2 were shot by Harley Baker (.1950) and master accuracy gunsmith Sid Goodling (.1990).

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt

First Time’s a Charm for Troy Twist. Benchrest Novice Shoots 0.126″ Group.

Shooting a .126 group would make any Benchrest shooter happy. If you accomplish that feat the very first time you ever shot a bench rifle, and in a real match to boot, then you have Troy Twist’s story.

Troy works with Dale Boop and was always talking guns. Dale convinced Troy to show up for the 100-yard stage and Dale let Troy shoot one of Dale’s rifles. Troy performed like a champ, drilling a 0.126″ group — not too bad for a rookie! Nothing like a small group to get a new shooter interested in our game.

Sunday was beautiful with sunny skies and pleasant temps. The wind was another matter. The Heavy Varmint 200-yard stage was conquered by Harley Baker with a .2689 Aggregate. No Match 5 heroes emerged to take away another Agg win from Harley. The only other Aggregate under 0.3 was posted by Jeff Peinhardt. Jeff is a newer shooter that is making a name for himself in Benchrest. Finishing off the top three in the Agg was Wayne Shaw. Wayne is sometimes more associated with score shooting, but he is a top-flight group shooter as well.

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt

The afternoon was set for Light Varmint 200 while the kaleidoscope of rapidly-changing flag colors continued. Jeff Stover led the way with a .2602 Agg. He tried to shoot whatever tail wind was available, and do it as fast as possible. Jeff got away with this sometimes dangerous tailwind strategy for four targets; on the fifth he was not burned as bad as he might have been. Closing in towards the end was Russell Rains with a .2904. Canadian Andy Laidlaw snuck into third place with a .2937 with the only remaining Aggregate under 0.3.

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt
Andy Laidlaw from Canada loads between stages.

In the overall 2-Gun, Harley Baker was the class of the field with a .2466 for twenty targets. Stover followed with a rather distant .2791. Steady Kent Harshman finished close behind with a .2833. Interestingly, both Stover and Harshman were shooting pull-down 8208 powder (from the Vietnam War era) rather than Vihtavuori 133 or the new kid on the block, Accurate Powder LT-32.

Boop Memorial Shoot PeinhardtTwo-Gun Top 3: Kent Harshman (Third), Harley Baker (Winner), Jeff Stover (Second).

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt
Moving backers are used in 100/200/300 yard benchrest competition.

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt
Dale and Russ Boop, shown above, are the sons of Nate Boop, in whose honor this Match has been held for 28 straight years. The Brothers Boop have been shooting Benchrest since they were little kids. Russ is in the Benchrest Hall of Fame and Dale is currently only two points out.

Father and Son Team — The Peinhardts
Jeff Peinhardt from Quarryville, PA owns PR2 Racing Technology. His company does national level motorcycle race engine development and tuning. His operation is a sophisticated engineering facility with CNC and the latest equipment. He has brought this analytical outlook and expertise to Benchrest.

Boop Memorial Shoot Peinhardt

Jeff is relatively new to the game, but has already excelled. His 16-year old son, Wyatt, has now moved from Junior Shooter to Rookie to Tough Competitor. Wyatt now runs with the “big dogs”. His father says the tougher the conditions, the better Wyatt does; he is a force to be reckoned with in the coming years.

Permalink Competition, News No Comments »
May 17th, 2014

Dream Job — Berger Bullets Seeks Sales and Marketing Director

Here is a ‘dream job’ for those of our readers with a marketing background…

Berger BulletsBerger Bullets just announced that the company is seeking a talented candidate to lead the bullet-maker’s sales and marketing efforts. Over the last decade, Berger Bullets has been blessed with strong growth. This has created opportunities for Berger to expand its operations. To lead this expansion, Berger is looking for a talented Sales and Marketing director.

Executive Vice President, Eric Stecker, who has been responsible to Berger’s sales and marketing efforts to date states, “when it comes to sales and marketing, Berger has a clear goal, a good plan and a great team. What we need is a quarterback to lead this effort into the future.”

The job opening is an upper management level position based in Fullerton, Californa. Candidates should have skills and related work experience in a variety of areas including leadership, communication, organization, industry and market knowledge, problem solving, budget review and planning.

Eric adds, “I regard Berger as a progressive company within the firearms industry. To that end we are looking for someone who will continue Berger down the path of growth success while at the same time bringing an open minded, outside-of-the-box perspective.” Berger will only consider applicants who have a career history in a leadership role within sales, marketing, or customer service. Candidates interested in this opportunity should email their resume to eric.stecker [at] bergerbullets.com.

Eric Stecker Berger Bullets

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May 16th, 2014

Changes at Remington — Jobs Moved, Product Lines Consolidated

Remington Outdoor Company Huntsville, AlabamaRemington Outdoor Company (formerly the Freedom Group), announced some big changes yesterday. A half-dozen product lines were consolidated, some small manufacturing facilities were targeted for shut-down, and a host of jobs are being “relocated” to Remington’s new Huntsville, Alabama factory. In addition, certain product lines now being made in Ilion, New York, will be shifted to Alabama.

Remington spokesman Teddy Novin declared: “[On May 15, 2014] we announced the consolidation of multiple company plants into our Huntsville, Alabama facility. This was a strategic business decision to concentrate our resources into fewer locations and improve manufacturing efficiency and quality. We are working hard to retain as many [workers] from the affected facilities as possible.

Doors Closing at Small Plants Around the Country
Numerous production facilities (currently operated by Remington sub-brands) will be shut down in multiple states, with business functions moved to Remington’s new 500,000-square-foot facility in Huntsville, Alabama. Most importantly, Bushmaster rifle production and the Remington 1911 production lines will be relocated from Ilion, New York to Huntsville. The DPMS plant in St. Cloud, Minnesota will be shuttered, with production shifted to Huntsville. Suppressor-maker Advanced Armament Corp. (AAC) will close its Lawrenceville, Georgia facility. Para-Ordance pistol production will halt in North Carolina and be shifted to Huntsville. Likewise,the Montana Rifleman (Kalispell, MT), TAPCO (Kennesaw, GA), and LAR Manufacturing (West Jordan, UT) production facilities will all be closed, with future production moved to Alabama. Below is a complete list of the consolidations and plant closures:

Sweet Home, Alabama — These Operations Will Be Moved:

  • Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC, moved from Lawrenceville, GA)
  • Bushmaster (moved from Ilion, NY)
  • DPMS – Panther Arms (moved from St. Cloud, MN)
  • LAR Manufacturing (moved from West Jordan, UT)
  • Montana Rifleman (moved from Kalispell, MT)
  • Para-Ordnance (moved from Pinevile, NC)
  • Remington 1911 (moved from Ilion, NY)
  • Tapco (moved from Kennesaw, GA)

We are also informed that some of the operations currently conducted at Remington’s Elizabethtown, Kentucky firearms plant and R&D facility will be moved to Huntsville, GA. However, we don’t have more specifics at this time.

Remington Logo Outdoor Company Ilion New York

The original Remington Arms Company was founded in 1816. Today’s Remington Outdoor Company, Inc. produces firearms, ammunition, and related outdoor products. The Firearms segment manufactures and sells sporting shotguns, rifles, handguns, modular firearms, and airguns under numerous brands including Remington, Bushmaster, Dakota, DPMS, Harrington & Richardson, Parker Gun, Marlin, Nesika, and Para-Ordnance. The Ammunition segment produces loaded ammo and bullets under Remington, UMC, Barnes, Dakota, and other brands. According to Businessweek, Remington Outdoor Company currently has 3,800 employees. George K. Kollitides is the Chief Executive and Chairman of the Board.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 3 Comments »
May 16th, 2014

Army Likes the .300 Win Mag — Places $20 Million Ammo Order

The U.S. Army has seen the benefits of the hard-hitting .300 Winchester Magnum (.300 Win Mag) round, and now it wants more — a lot more. The Army has ordered twenty million dollars worth of .300 Win Mag ammo from ATK, to be used primarily in the Army’s M2010 sniper rifle.

xm2010 m2010 sniper rifle .300 Winchester Magnum WM Win Mag

ATK has announced a five-year, fixed-price, indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract with the U.S. Army for the production of Mk248 Mod 0, 190-grain and Mk248 Mod 1, 220-grain .300 Winchester Magnum (Win Mag) rifle ammunition. The Army has selected this ammunition for primary use in its M2010 Sniper rifle. According to ATK’s press release, the award has an estimated maximum value of $20 million over the life of the contract. The ammunition will be manufactured at ATK’s Anoka, Minnesota, Federal Premium Ammunition factory. Said ATK’s Sporting Group President Jay Tibbets, “We are proud the U.S. Army has selected our 300 Win Mag ammunition.”

M2010 Sniper Rifle with Suppressor (Click to Zoom)
xm2010 m2010 sniper rifle .300 Winchester Magnum WM Win Mag

The U.S. Army first issued M2010s to snipers at the U.S. Army Sniper School in January 2011. Army snipers have been using the M2010 in combat in Afghanistan since March 2011. The M2010’s .300 Win Mag round extends the engagement range over the M24 from 800 meters to 1,200 meters, enhancing lethality and standoff. The M2010 fires .300 Winchester Magnum ammunition to provide approximately 50% greater effective range compared to the M24’s 7.62x51mm NATO. The U.S. Army hopes that the additional effective range helps their snipers in engagements in mountainous and desert terrain in which the war in Afghanistan is fought. Note: As originally developed by Remington, the rifle was called the XM2010. As officially adopted by the U.S. Military, it is now designated the M2010.

xm2010 m2010 sniper rifle .300 Winchester Magnum WM Win Mag

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo 6 Comments »
May 15th, 2014

Gunny Ermey Hosts New TV Show: ‘Saving Private K-9′

Saving Private K-9, a new, original television show, debuts tonight on the Sportsman Channel. Hosted by ‘Gunny’ R. Lee Ermey, Saving Private K-9 features the dedicated working dogs who perform important tasks for the U.S. Armed Services as well as law enforcement agencies. For the 2,500 teams of canines and handlers who serve with America’s military and law enforcement organizations, the idea of a dog being “man’s best friend” is no overstatement.

Saving Private K-9 Television R. Lee Ermy

Each episode of Saving Private K-9 highlights the featured dogs’ specialized training, battlefield accomplishments, and relationships with their handlers. Many episodes include inspiring accounts of courageous acts by military dogs, as told by those who fought beside them. Additionally, the show will focus on the dogs’ post-service lives, which often involve rigorous rehabilitation prior to adoption.

Watch ‘Saving Private K-9′ Trailer

Saving Private K-9 premiers Thursday, May 15 at 8:30 pm ET/PT. Hosted by actor and former Marine R. Lee Ermey, the series is part of Sportsman’s Salute to Service initiative.

Permalink - Videos, News 1 Comment »
May 15th, 2014

CMP Summer Camps are Filling Up Quickly

CMP summer Air Rifle CampEach summer the Civilian Marksmanship Program sponsors a popular series of Junior Air Rifle Camps and Clinics to teach intermediate and advanced marksmanship skills to junior shooters. All camps are one-week-long, three-position air rifle camps, with the exception of the Outreach Clinics and the Advanced Standing Camp.

The CMP’s summer Rifle Training Camps are filling up fast. Many camps are now posted as full, and several more will be full soon. If you want to help a Junior get involved, act soon. Interested Juniors should sign-up today for one of the remaining CMP Camps or Clinics. These are great training options for the summer. For more information, visit: http://thecmp.org/3p/camp.htm.

Camp

Location

Camp Dates

1

Anniston, AL- CMP South

2-6 June

Clinic A

Progresso, TX (Outreach Clinic)

2-4 June

2

Anniston, AL- CMP South

9-13 June

3

Camp Perry, OH- CMP North

9-13 June

Clinic 1

Willard, MO- Springfield Area (Outreach Clinic) **FULL**

16-18 June

4

Anniston, AL- CMP South **FULL**

16-20 June

5

Camp Perry, OH- CMP North **FULL**

16-20 June

Stand A
30 June-2 July

Clinic 2

Port Orchard, WA- Seattle Area (Outreach Clinic)

7-9 July

Clinic 3

Bozeman, MT (Outreach Clinic)

7-9 July

Stand 1

Phoenix, AZ- Ben Avery (Advanced Standing Camp)

10-12 July

6

Anniston, AL- CMP South **FULL**

14-18 July

7

Phoenix, AZ- Ben Avery **FULL**

14-18 July

8

Anniston, AL- CMP South **FULL**

21-25 July

9

Kerrville, TX **FULL**

21-25 July

10

Anniston, AL- CMP South**FULL**

28 July-1 Aug

11

Fountain, CO **FULL**

28 July-1 Aug

Stand 2

Anniston, AL- CMP South (Advanced Standing Camp)

4-6 Aug

Permalink Shooting Skills No Comments »
May 14th, 2014

Ammo Failure (Detonation?) in 3-Gun Match — Watch and Wince

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-GunWhat happens when a round goes off unsafely in an AR? Watch this video and see. At about the 00:40 time-mark the shooter has a malfunction (click no bang), with a round. He then removes the magazine, and clears the chamber (we think). On the next round, at 00:53 you hear a “Bang” and see a big puff of smoke coming out of the upper receiver (see photo at right). This has been called a “detonation” by the video-maker, but we’re not 100% sure what happened. What do you guys think? Watch the video carefully, and state your conclusions in the comment section if you wish.

What Caused this Malfunction? Watch Video…

In any event, the shooter is fortunate his upper did not completely fracture, launching shrapnel into his face or other body parts. This could have turned out much worse. Here are screen-shots from the video, showing details of the gun after the accident, along with the recovered brass case, which separated near the case-head.

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

AR kaboom detonation over charge ammo 3-Gun

Permalink - Videos, Tactical 31 Comments »
May 14th, 2014

NSSF Rimfire Challenge Match is a Huge Success

What do you call a shooting match that draws 125 competitors (ages 7 to 70), with 30 first-ever shooters, 36 ladies, and 17 juniors? We call that a rip-roaring success. Credit the Old Fort Gun Club in Arkansas for hosting such a successful event on April 26-27, 2014. The impressive turn-out shows the appeal of the NSSF Rimfire Challenge format, a fun match with FREE ammo provided by sponsors.

Video Shows Rimfire Challenge Fun Match.

The match attracted target shooters from 10 states. More than 30 participants said it was their first time competing in a shooting event. Thirty-six of the 125 competitors were female, 17 were juniors, and 17 were seniors. This is the kind of match that is fun for all age levels.

Old Fort Arkansas Rimfire Challenge NSSF

The NSSF Rimfire Challenge is a program of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the trade association for the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industry. NSSF Rimfire Challenge was developed to introduce newcomers to target shooting by providing individuals and families with a safe, fun and exciting first-time experience using .22-caliber handguns and rifles and steel targets.

Awards were given to the top three finishers in Open and Limited Divisions, along with the top finisher in the Juniors, Seniors, Ladies, and Cowboy/Cowgirl categories. All registered shooters were also eligible to win sponsor-provided prizes.

Old Fort Arkansas Rimfire Challenge NSSF

Support for the match was provided by Volquartsen Custom, Brownells, Ruger, Hogue, and other companies. “I’d like to thank NSSF for supporting these matches,” said Bill Striplin, match director and Old Fort Gun Club president. “In my opinion, the NSSF Rimfire Challenge is the most fun shooting game in the world.” Learn more about the NSSF Rimfire Challenge at www.NSSF.org/rimfire. That web site also has a schedule of future Rimfire Challenge matches around the country.

Old Fort Arkansas Rimfire Challenge NSSF

Permalink Competition, News No Comments »
May 14th, 2014

Shooter’s POV — Across the Atlantic with Jim De Kort

What does a 1000-yard target look like when viewed through a 25-power* First Focal Plane scope? Here’s the answer, thanks to our Dutch friend Jim de Kort. This interesting photo shows the Stickledown Range at the National Shooting Centre in Bisley, England.

Click any image for larger view.

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

Jim has published some other interesting images on his Facebook Page. Here is a view looking downrange at a 300m shooting facility. Jim says “It was nice to have 300m all to ourselves”. The overhanging baffles stop stray shots that might otherwise fly out over populated areas. This photo was taken at the Schietsportcentrum Emmen in the Netherlands.

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

How many of these cartridge types do you shoot? Jim has quite the collection of calibers.

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

Jim likes faithful canines and accurate rifles. We know the feeling, and we bet many of our readers share Jim’s “favorite two hobbies” — dogs and guns. Jim says: “Dogs are like guns…. They bark, smell, eat expensive food, need cleaning once in a while and you have to take them outside regularly.”

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

Jim De Kort Gallery Accurateshooter.com Netherlands Bisley shooting

*NOTE: The scope in the top photo is a Premier 5-25x56mm ER-MOA with 1/4 MOA clicks, “set at 20x so [Jim] can watch both neighbors”.

Permalink Competition 7 Comments »
May 13th, 2014

Blast from the Past — Benchresters Circa 1955

With so much attention given to the newest hardware, and most recent reloading innovations, we sometimes forget that Benchrest shooting, as a competitive sport, has been around for quite a long time. And some of those “old school” shooters managed to put together some pretty fine groups even without 21st Century gadgets and gear.

Click Photo to See Larger Version.
1955 Benchrest shooters

Here are some of the founding fathers of benchrest shooting, in a photo taken nearly six decades ago (4/3/1955). Men’s fashion has changed a bit over the years. Tony Boyer notwithstanding, you won’t find so many Stetsons at a shooting match these days. Courtesy of Sierra Bullets, here’s a “throwback” image of Benchrest shooters at the Brea, California “Round-Up” Shoot April 2 – 3, 1955. Left to right are: Frank Snow, (Founder of Sierra Manufacturing Company), John Moffit, K. E. “Smitty” Smith (NBRSA Director), Al Christie, E.F. Stewart, Jack Rice (sitting), I. F. Jack Williams, Lindsey King (behind Williams), Don “6mm” Smith, Frank Hemsted, and Art L. Elliott.

If you like this sort of “trip down memory lane”, visit Sierra Bullets’ Facebook page. Every Thursday morning, Sierra publishes a “Throwback Thursday” photograph from some decades past, together with a short featurette on the shooting-related item/person in the photo.

Permalink News 1 Comment »
May 13th, 2014

Lyman Case Prep Xpress — Versatile, Affordable

For a few years now, Lyman has offered the Case Prep Xpress, an all-in-one case prep center that chamfers necks (inside and out), cleans and uniforms primer pockets, brushes the inside of case-necks, and uniforms flash holes. The unit can also ream out the crimps on military brass. However, the Lyman Case Prep Xpress does NOT trim cases.

The Lyman Case Press Xpress comes with all the necessary tools and attachments (listed below), so you don’t have to purchase extra accessories. The 5 gear-driven heads on the unit are powered by a high torque, low-speed motor ideal for case prep operations. Lyman’s Case Prep Xpress features handy storage areas for accessories, a removable brass shavings dump pan, and a handy clean-up brush.

Lyman Case Prep Xpress Lyman Case Prep Xpress Includes:

Inside Deburr (VLD) Tool

Outside Deburr Tool

Flash Hole Uniformer

Primer Pocket Uniformer (Large & Small)

Primer Pocket Reamer (Large & Small)

Primer Pocket Cleaner (Large & Small)

Case Neck Brushes (25, 30, 38 & 45 Cal)

Case Neck Lube (Mica)

Removable Brass Shavings Dump Pan

Clean-up Brush

In the two years that this product has been on the market it has been a hot seller. We’ve used the Case Prep Xpress. If you’re prepping hundreds of cases, this unit will save considerable time and reduce hand/finger fatigue. While the Case Prep Express is not as sturdy as the metal-bodied Hornady prep center, the Lyman unit offers a lot of functionality for the price ($108-$125 at various vendors).

Video clearly illustrates all case prep functions. Worth watching.

Lyman Case Prep XpressYou can find Lyman’s Case Prep Xpress for under $120.00, making it much less expensive than the larger Hornady Case Prep Center, which runs about $400.00. The Hornady unit is beefier, and will trim cases. However, we think the compact Lyman unit makes sense for guys who already have a good case trimmer, such as a Forster or Wilson. The Lyman Case Prep Xpress is hundreds of dollars less than the Hornady prep center. The money you save will buy lots of bullets and brass.

Case Prep Xpress $108.08 at Midsouth
The Lyman Case Prep Xpress is sold by most of the big vendors. The best current price we found was at Midsouth Shooters Supply, which sells the Lyman unit for $108.08.

Story Sourced by Edlongrange.
Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »