October 12th, 2014

Stud Rail Adapter Mounts Picatinny Rail on Sling Swivel Stud

Here’s a cleverly-designed new product that adds versatility to any rifle with a front sling swivel stud. This new Stud Rail Adapter (SRA) allows you to mount a Picatinny Rail on a sling swivel stud. With the SRA in place, you can attach any accessories that clamp to a Pic rail, such as lights, lasers, pistol grips, or rail-affixed tactical bipods. And look carefully — the SRA’s designers included a sling swivel at the inboard end of the unit. That way you can mount Picatinny-rail accessories and still use your carry sling.

STR Harris Stud Rail Adapter Sling Swivel

Sold by Harrisbipods.com, the SRA Stud Rail Adapter retails for $47.85. NOTE: HarrisBipods.com is a web retailer. This is NOT Harris Engineering, the manufacturer of Harris bipods. HarrisBipods.com does sell the full line of Harris bipods and most Harris accessories. However, as far as we can tell the SRA is NOT made by Harris Engineering.

Comment: We think this adapter is a useful invention, particularly for those who might want to mount a light to a varmint rifle. Most hunting rifles have a front sling swivel stud and there is now a very wide selection of Picatinny-rail-mounted accessories.

Product tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
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October 12th, 2014

F-TR Fall Foliage by Phillips

The USA F-Class National Championships will be held October 28 – November 2, 2014 in Phoenix, AZ. Many top competitors are out practicing, perfecting their technique and their loads. Here’s a photo from our friend Paul Phillips, a member of the World Championship F-TR Team USA. Paul enjoyed the colorful fall foliage at his Michigan home range: “It was a great day to practice for the Nationals. My load and rifle are shooting great. Now I need to load 300 rounds with my recipe.”

CLICK IMAGE for Desktop Wallpaper-Worthy Full-Screen Version
Fall foliage F-TR F/TR Nationals Paul Phillips .308 Win F-Class Phoenix 2014

Under Two Inches at 500 Yards
To be competitive at the Nationals, one needs a tack-driving rifle and an ultra-accurate load. Shown below is one of Paul Phillips’s load development targets at 500 yards. The total 5-shot group size is under two inches. Impressive. That’s with 200gr Bergers, Varget powder, and large primer Lapua brass. Paul tell us: “At the upcoming Nationals we will be competing at 1000 yards. The X-Ring is 5 inches at 1000 (equivalent to 2.5 inches at 500). We strive to be all in the X-Ring. However, wind is the big obstacle. A gust of wind can move you 1-2 feet away.”

Fall foliage F-TR F/TR Nationals Paul Phillips .308 Win F-Class Phoenix 2014

Paul Phillips at Raton in 2013
Fall foliage F-TR F/TR Nationals Paul Phillips .308 Win F-Class Phoenix 2014

F-Class National Championship
The 2014 National F-Class Shooting Championship will be held in Phoenix, Arizona at the Ben Avery Shooting Facility. Preparations are well underway to host competitors from around the world. One of the largest events of its kind in USA, the NRA-sanctioned F-Class Nationals will be hosted by the Desert Sharpshooters Rifle Club.

CLICK HERE for 2014 F-Class Nationals Program and Entry Form.

The F-Class National Championship is a multi-day match with all shooting at 1000 yards. There will be a mix of individual and four-person team matches. The competition consists of two different Divisions: F- Open and F-TR (Target Rifle). Each Division is made up of five different Categories: High Master, Master, Expert, Sharpshooter and Marksman.

Entry Deadline: The deadline for entries is 6:00 PM Monday, 20 October 2014. Entries after this time are considered late entries and may be accepted to fill vacancies on existing relays only. An additional $20.00 will be charged for late entries, above the normal $200.00 Entry Fee.

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October 12th, 2014

Cartridge OAL — How It Affects Pressure, Velocity, and Accuracy

Berger Bullets COAL length cartridgeEffects Of Cartridge Over All Length (COAL) And Cartridge Base To Ogive (CBTO) – Part 1
by Bryan Litz for Berger Bullets.
Many shooters are not aware of the dramatic effects that bullet seating depth can have on the pressure and velocity generated by a rifle cartridge. Cartridge Overall Length (COAL) is also a variable that can be used to fine-tune accuracy. It’s also an important consideration for rifles that need to feed rounds through a magazine. In this article, we’ll explore the various effects of COAL, and what choices a shooter can make to maximize the effectiveness of their hand loads.

Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute (SAAMI)
Most loading manuals (including the Berger Manual), present loading data according to SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) standards. SAAMI provides max pressure, COAL and many other specifications for commercial cartridges so that rifle makers, ammo makers, and hand loaders can standardize their products so they all work together. As we’ll see later in this article, these SAAMI standards are in many cases outdated and can dramatically restrict the performance potential of a cartridge.

Bullet seating depth is an important variable in the accuracy equation. In many cases, the SAAMI specified COAL is shorter than what a hand loader wants to load their rounds to for accuracy purposes. In the case where a hand loader seats the bullets longer than SAAMI specified COAL, there are some internal ballistic effects that take place which are important to understand.

Effects of Seating Depth / COAL on Pressure and Velocity
The primary effect of loading a cartridge long is that it leaves more internal volume inside the cartridge. This extra internal volume has a well known effect; for a given powder charge, there will be less pressure and less velocity produced because of the extra empty space. Another way to look at this is you have to use more powder to achieve the same pressure and velocity when the bullet is seated out long. In fact, the extra powder you can add to a cartridge with the bullet seated long will allow you to achieve greater velocity at the same pressure than a cartridge with a bullet seated short.

Berger Bullets COAL length cartridge

Figure 1. When the bullet is seated farther out of the case, there is more volume available for powder. This enables the cartridge to generate higher muzzle velocity with the same pressure.

When you think about it, it makes good sense. After all, when you seat the bullet out longer and leave more internal case volume for powder, you’re effectively making the cartridge into a bigger cartridge by increasing the size of the combustion chamber. Figure 1 illustrates the extra volume that’s available for powder when the bullet is seated out long.

Before concluding that it’s a good idea to start seating your bullets longer than SAAMI spec length, there are a few things to consider.

Geometry of a Chamber Throat
The chamber in a rifle will have a certain throat length which will dictate how long a bullet can be loaded. The throat is the forward portion of the chamber that has no rifling. The portion of the bullet’s bearing surface that projects out of the case occupies the throat (see Figure 2).

Berger Bullets COAL length cartridge

The length of the throat determines how much of the bullet can stick out of the case. When a cartridge is chambered and the bullet encounters the beginning of the rifling, known as the lands, it’s met with hard resistance. This COAL marks the maximum length that a bullet can be seated. When a bullet is seated out to contact the lands, its initial forward motion during ignition is immediately resisted by an engraving force.

Seating a bullet against the lands causes pressures to be elevated noticeably higher than if the bullet were seated just a few thousandths of an inch off the lands.

A very common practice in precision reloading is to establish the COAL for a bullet that’s seated to touch the lands. This is a reference length that the hand loader works from when searching for the optimal seating depth for precision. Many times, the best seating depth is with the bullet touching or very near the lands. However, in some rifles, the best seating depth might be 0.100″ or more off the lands. This is simply a variable the hand loader uses to tune the precision of a rifle.

CLICK HERE to Read Full Article with More Info

Article sourced by EdLongrange. We welcome tips from readers.
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October 12th, 2014

Stand and Deliver — DeMille Shows How It’s Done

The Western CMP Games and Creedmoor Cup Matches are underway right now in Phoenix, at the Ben Avery Shooting Facility. One of yesterday’s match winners was Dennis DeMille, General Manager of Creedmoor Sports, and a past National High Power Rifle Champion (2005). In the Military Rifle Match, Dennis showed how it was done, firing a 286-9X, to win the match. Below, shooting his 7.62×51 M1A, Dennis demonstrates his flawless form in standing.

Dennis Demille Creedmoor Sports

Dennis Demille Creedmoor Sports

Other Western Games shooters offered these comments about Dennis DeMille:

“CWO DeMille was my former OIC at Edson Range. I was part of the MCRD Shooing Team when he was the OIC as well. This man is Marksmanship — a true Gun Slinger and good friend.” — K.S.

“I have shot along side him before. [Dennis] just plain rocks in Service Rifle.” — Mike M.

“Other than the additional grey hair, some things never change.” — Mark T. V.M.

“Except for that ‘7’, standing!” — Emil P.

Match photos courtesy the Shooter’s Journal Facebook Group Page. File photo lower left courtesy First Shot Online Magazine.

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