December 6th, 2014

Remington Agrees to Fix Triggers in 7.85 Million Rifles

Remington 700 Rem recallAccording to a CNBC report, Remington has agreed to replace (or upgrade) the triggers on 7.85 million Remington rifles including ALL Remington 700s, and a dozen other models including the Model Seven, Sportsman 78, 673, 710, 715, 770, 600, 660, XP-100, 721, 722, and 725. CNBC reported that, as part of the settlement of a class action lawsuit, Remington has agreed to provide trigger replacements (or other solutions) to all owners of the affected rifle models. While Remington is not specifically recalling all the affected firearms, Big Green has committed to offering trigger upgrades (or other compensation) on millions of firearms produced over many decades. In a released statement, Remington insisted it was not “recalling” the affected rifles, but Remington did offer to replace the triggers on request. This corrective program could, potentially, involve millions of rifles (though we doubt that most Rem 700 and Model Seven owners will actually request trigger modifications.)

Affected Remington Products: Model 700, Seven, Sportsman 78, 673, 710, 715, 770, 600, 660, XP-100, 721, 722 and 725.

According to CNBC: “America‚Äôs oldest gun manufacturer, Remington, has agreed to replace millions of triggers in its most popular product — the Model 700 rifle. While insisting its action is not a recall of the iconic gun, Remington says in a statement that it is agreeing to make the changes ‘to avoid the uncertainties and expense of protracted litigation.’ The settlement involves a class action suit brought in 2013 by Ian Pollard of Concordia, Missouri, who claimed his Remington 700 rifle fired on multiple occasions without the trigger being pulled.”

According to the Montana Standard, the proposed Remington class action settlement will include model-by-model solutions:
— For Models 700, Seven, Sportsman 78 and 673 rifles, Remington will remove the original Walker trigger mechanism and replace it with a new X-Mark Pro mechanism.
— For Models 710, 715 and 770, Remington will remove the original trigger mechanism and replace it with a Model 770 connector-less mechanism.
— For Models 600, 660, XP-100, 721, 722 and 725, Remington will provide vouchers of $12.50 or $10, depending on the model, redeemable for Remington products.
— For Models 700 and Seven rifles made between May 2006 and April 9, 2014 with an X-Mark Pro trigger mechanism, Remington will retro-fit a new, improved assembly.

Remington Recall cnbc trigger X-Mark Pro Rem 700

Under the terms of the settlement (which must ultimately receive Court approval), Remington will pay for the parts and labor involved to replace or fix trigger mechanisms, at no cost to the owner. The scope of the settlement may include rifles which previously had trigger upgrades done by owners. According to CNBC, “For guns that cannot be retrofitted, the company plans to offer vouchers for Remington products”. LINK: Related Story with Mis-Fire Demo Video.

CLICK HERE to view Remington Proposed Settlement Document (PDF file)

Will This be a Thirty Million-Dollar Fix?
How much will the trigger fix program cost Remington? That is hard to predict. However, Remington Outdoors (previously known as “The Freedom Group”) told its investors last month that it had allocated $29.7 million for a “Model 700 settlement reserve”.

Permalink Gunsmithing, News 9 Comments »
December 6th, 2014

Got Stub? Barrel Stub Gauges Serve Many Functions

Next time you have a barrel fitted, consider having your gunsmith create a “stub gauge” from a left-over piece of barrel steel (ideally taken from your new barrel blank). The outside diameter isn’t important — the key thing is that the stub gauge is created with the same reamer used to chamber your current barrel, and the stub must have the same bore diameter, with the same land/groove configuration, as the barrel on your rifle. When properly made, a stub gauge gives you an accurate three-dimensional model of the upper section of your chamber and throat. This comes in handy when you need to bump your case shoulders. Just slide a fired case (with spent primer removed) in the stub gauge and measure from base of case to the end of the gauge. Then, after bumping, re-measure to confirm how much you’ve moved the shoulder.

Barrel Stub Gauge

In addition, the stub gauge lets you measure the original length to lands and freebore when your barrel was new. This gives you a baseline to accurately assess how far your throat erodes with use. Of course, as the throat wears, to get true length-to-lands dimension, you need take your measurement using your actual barrel. The barrel stub gauge helps you set the initial bullet seating depth. Seating depth is then adjusted accordingly, based on observed throat erosion, or your preferred seating depth.

Forum member RussT explains: “My gunsmith [makes a stub gauge] for me on every barrel now. I order a barrel an inch longer and that gives him enough material when he cuts off the end to give me a nice case gauge. Though I don’t have him cut that nice-looking window in the side (as shown in photos). That’s a neat option. You can tell how much throat erosion you are getting from when it was new as well. For measuring initial seating depths, this is the most useful item on my loading bench next to calipers. Everyone should have a case gauge made by there smith if you have a new barrel put on.”

Forum member Lawrence H. has stub gauges made with his chamber reamers for each new barrel. He has his smith cut a port in the stub steel so Lawrence can actually see how the bullet engages the rifling in a newly-cut chamber. With this “view port”, one can also see how the case-neck fits in the chamber. Lawrence tells us: “My stub gauges are made from my barrels and cut with my chamber reamers. With them I can measure where my bullets are ‘touching the lands’ and shoulder bump dimensions. This is a very simple tool that provides accurate information.” To learn more about stub gauges, read this Forum Thread. The photos above and below show Lawrence’s stub gauges:

Barrel Stub Gauge

Permalink Gunsmithing, Reloading No Comments »
December 6th, 2014

Holiday Ammo-Shopping with AmmoSeek, GunBot, and Slickguns

Ammo ammunition webbotWith Christmas less than three weeks away, our readers’ thoughts are turning to holiday decorations, Yuletide gatherings, and “Where the heck can I find some darn .22 LR ammo!” Sad to say, you won’t find large quantities of .22 LR rimfire ammunition on the shelves of Wally World — those days are long gone. Affordable rimfire fodder remains in (relatively) short supply in the USA. However, if you’re willing to harness the power of the internet, you should be able to find the rimfire ammo you need.

We use three specialty search engines to locate bulk .22 LR ammo (and centerfire ammo as well): Ammoseek.com, Gunbot.net, and Slickguns.com. There are others, but these are three of the most effective. Here’s what we found this morning of December 6, 2014, using these three websites.

Ammoseek.com

It’s really easy to find .22 LR ammo using Ammoseek.com. There is a handy “Quick Seek” .22 LR search link that instantly searches 108 different vendors. Shown below is just a partial list of the 481 items we found in seconds using Ammoseek’s .22 LR Quick Link. For future reference, bookmark the following link: http://ammoseek.com/ammo/22lr.

Ammo Search Guns ammoseek gunbot slickguns

Gunbot.net

Link Ammoseek.com, Gunbot.net provides single-click search capability for .22 LR rimfire ammo. Simply click on the “22LR” Link on Gunbot’s home page, and within a few seconds you’ll get results from dozens of online ammunition suppliers. And of course you can select other popular types of ammo with a single click as well. For the best deals, select “Sort by Price” with the sort pull-down menu (by default it displays the newest result first.) We’ve highlighted the sort field in the illustration below so you don’t miss it. (You’ll probably want to click “in-stock only” as well.) Bookmark this GunBot .22 LR Quicklink to speed up your next 22LR search: http://gunbot.net/ammo/rimfire/22lr/.

Ammo Search Guns ammoseek gunbot slickguns

NOTE: Gunbot.net is slower than Ammoseek.com. However Gunbot.net’s page is clean and simple, not plagued by distracting banners.

Slickguns.com

The Slickguns.com site is a little different than Ammoseek and Gunbot, because it covers a wider range of products, including firearms, knives, shooting accessories and more. With so many options, it’s easy to get lost on the Slickguns.com home page. Here’s a tip for ammo-shoppers — first click the “Ammo” link at the top. Then pick “22 LR” from the list of ammo types. For easy reference, bookmark this link: http://www.slickguns.com/category/ammo?caliber=3.

NOTE: You can pick other ammo types from the list of “Popular Calibers”. Here’s what you’ll see on Slickguns.com’s Ammo Page:

Ammo Search Guns ammoseek gunbot slickguns

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tech Tip 6 Comments »