December 18th, 2014

SK .22 LR Rimfire Ammunition Available at Powder Valley Now

If you need rimfire ammunition, Powder Valley Inc. (PVI) just received a large shipment of SK .22 LR ammunition from Europe. This is good quality, German-made ammo, much better than the bulk-pack Federal and Winchester fodder. SK is run by the same parent company that owns Lapua. Right now the practice-grade 40gr .22LR SK Standard ammo is $5.50 per box of 50 cartridges, while the rifle Match grade ammo is $8.40 per box. Act quickly ladies and gents. This will probably sell out pretty quickly. To find this on the PVI site, click “Ammo” then “Rifle Ammo” then “Lapua”.

sk rimfire ammo ammunition powder valley

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December 18th, 2014

NEW Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Bullets from Sierra

Sierra has announced a new line of plastic-tipped MatchKing bullets. “Say What!? — that can’t be right…” you may be thinking. MatchKings have always been jacketed, hollowpoint bullets. Until now, plastic tips have been reserved for other Sierra projectiles, such as BlitzKing varmint bullets. But that is changing with the introduction of Sierra’s line of Tipped MatchKing (TMK) bullets featuring green acetal resin tips.

.308 30 caliber Sierra bullets tipped matchking TMK SMK

Plastic Tips Offer Better BC
Sierra says the plastic tips on TMKs enhance the Ballistic Coefficient (BC): “The major advantage of adding a tip to the bullet is the reduction of drag, producing a more favorable ballistic coefficient.” Stated BCs for the new TMK bullets are listed below. These BC numbers look good, and they have been verified with real-world testing: “We shot [all the new TMKs] multiple times (we actually test our BC numbers instead of letting a computer tell us what it is) and those numbers are all proven out!”

There will be six (6) new TMK bullets, two in .224 caliber, and four in .308 caliber. The six new tipped bullet types should be available in “early 2015″. Sorry, Sierra will not be offering 6mm, 6.5mm, or 7mm TMKs for the time being, although Sierra will introduce more TMK varieties in the future. Currently, Sierra is focusing on “the most popular calibers”. Notably, the new 22-Cal 77gr TMK has a 0.420 BC — identical to the BC of Sierra’s 80gr non-tipped HPBT MatchKing. So, you get the BC of a heavier bullet in a lighter projectile that can be pushed faster. That’s big news for .223 Rem and 22-250 shooters.

Bullet Name (Click for ballistic coefficients) Brand Item BC (G1)
.224 dia. 69 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .224 dia. 69 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7169 .375 @ 2700+ fps
.224 dia. 77 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .224 dia. 77 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7177 .420 @ 2400+ fps
.308 dia. 125 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .308 dia. 125 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7725 .343 @ 2580+ fps
.308 dia. 155 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .308 dia. 155 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7755 .519 @ 1900+ fps
.308 dia. 168 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .308 dia. 168 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7768 .535 @ 2050+ fps
.308 dia. 175 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) .308 dia. 175 gr. Tipped MatchKing (TMK) Tipped MatchKing 7775 .545 @ 2400+ fps

New Bullet Shapes Along with Plastic Tips
In addition to the bullet tip, some of these new TMK bullets have slightly modified shapes compared to previous-generation, non-tipped MatchKings (SMKs) of like caliber/weight. Sierra’s technicians reported: “The [plastic] point on the tip is smaller than the meplat on a SMK and if you look, you will also see the ogive on most of these [new TMKs] have been changed as well. Most of the big BC gains are from the reshaped ogives from the legacy SMK product.”

TMK 7169 69 gr
TMK 7177 77 gr
TMK 7725 125 grTMK 7755  155 gr
TMK 7768 168 gr
TMK 7775 175 gr

.308 30 caliber Sierra bullets tipped matchking TMK SMK

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December 18th, 2014

Boone and Crockett Club Rejects Scoring for Captive Game

Boone & Crockett Club Hunting fair chaseThe Boone and Crockett Club (B&C) has renounced the use of its name and scoring system in conjunction with hunting programs that use captive deer and elk. “With the growth of the deer breeding and shooting industry, and modern marketing and selling of ‘shooter bucks’ raised in captivity and graded and sold using B&C scores, it was time to make this unauthorized use of our scoring system more widely known,” said B&C club president William A. Demmer.

The Idaho Statesman agrees: “The Boone and Crockett Club has reinforced its heritage as a conservation organization by banning the use of its name and scoring system for captive deer and elk advertised for or killed in canned hunts. It’s the right call for the club and an important step to separate trophy, free-ranging big-game animals taken by hunters under fair-chase conditions from captive animals manipulated to grow large antlers and shot in a controlled, captive environment.”

For nearly 100 years Boone and Crockett’s record books and B&C scores have been considered the gold standard for evaluating and verifying the trophy quantity of wild, native North American big game taken under fair chase conditions. With this resolution, ratified at Boone and Crockett’s 127th annual meeting this month, B&C is taking a firm stand against captive game hunting programs:

The Boone and Crockett Club scoring system exists to document the successful conservation of wild game animals in North America. The Boone and Crockett Club objects to and rejects any use of or reference to the Boone and Crockett Club or its scoring system in connection with antlers/horns grown by animals in captivity.

Through this official resolution, the Club reaffirms that no one is authorized to exploit this standard by using the B&C scoring system, name or logo in connection with captive animals. The Club strictly opposes any attempt to legitimize the trophy quality of pen-raised animals or put and take shooting operations by associating either with the Boone and Crockett Club.

About Boone and Crockett Club Scoring
The Boone and Crockett Club’s records program was established in 1906 as a way of detailing species once thought headed for extinction. In response to public interest generated by B&C’s National Collection of Heads and Horns in the 1920s, and increased hunting by the general public, the Club established an official measurement and scoring system for trophy big game. The National Collection and the measurement system were initially conceived to record species of North American big game thought to be vanishing. Club Members and others in the scientific community soon recognized that the system was an effective means of tracking the success of new conservation policies. Today, the B&C scoring system is used to collect data on free-ranging big game. These data reflect successful conservation efforts, population health and habitat quality. Biologists compare and contrast records to improve local management strategies as well as state and federal wildlife policies.

Boone & Crockett Club Hunting fair chase

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