January 5th, 2015

Shooting USA Worth Watching This Week

This week’s episode of Shooting USA TV, the first of the new year, is definitely worth watching. The lead story focuses on the 35th Annual Bianchi Cup — the richest and most prestigious match in the handgun shooting sports. Competitors shoot four stages over a three-day period, and everyone aims for that perfect score: 1,920. Watch this episode on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 to see the world’s best handgunners in action.

Bianchi Cup Shooting USA
Photo courtesy NRABlog.com

The Legendary Lee Enfield
This week, Shooting USA also features the Lee Enfield MK III, also known as the SMLE for “Short Magazine Lee Enfield”. Introduced in 1907, the SMLE was the primary British infantry weapon during WWI. The Lee Enfield’s speed of cycling, versatility, and reliability made it one of the great 20th-Century battle rifles. “I’ve never read a disparaging word by a WWI British soldier against his Enfield,” says Firearms Historian Garry James. “His government [gave] him a really good firearm.”

Shooting USA Lee Enfield MK III SMLE

Julie Golob Talks About Carry Handguns
In the Pro Tip segment of the January 7th broadcast, Smith & Wesson Pro shooter Julie Golob offers advice for first-time gun buyers. Julie reviews various options among revolvers and semi-automatic pistols. She discusses factors to consider: weight, balance, firepower, ease of use and concealability.

Shooting USA Lee Enfield MK III SMLE

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January 5th, 2015

Good News — Far Fewer Fatal Gun Accidents Than Ever

More guns, fewer fatal accidents — that’s the “take-away” from a report recently published by the National Shorting Sports Foundation (NSSF). We’re pleased to see that efforts to increase firearms safety are working. Even though the ranks of gun-owners have grown dramatically, the rate of unintentional firearms fatalities (per 100,000 persons) has dropped to an all-time low.

There has been a huge decrease in accidental gun-related fatalities over the last century (measured as a percentage of the population). NSSF reports: “The 2012 Center for Disease Control and Prevention WISQARS accidental fatality data shows the lowest number of unintentional firearm-related fatalities per year ever reported (going back to 1903)”. As Dean Weingarten of Gun Watch explains: “The accidental fatal firearm rate has dropped by 94% since we started keeping statistics, even though the total number of firearms per capita has likely at least doubled. You need to look at the rates — accidental firearm fatalities per 100,000 population — to see the stunning reduction in the last century.”

Accidental Firearms deaths NSSF

Only 0.4% of unintentional fatalities now involve firearms. The biggest killer, to our surprise, is poisoning, which accounts for 28.4% of accidental deaths. Motor vehicles, not unexpectedly, rank second at 27.3% (see chart below). Even suffocation, at 4.9%, accounts for 12 times more unintentional deaths than firearms.

Accidental Firearms deaths NSSF

GET NSSF REPORT HERE: DOWNLOAD NSSF Firearms-related Industry Safety Report.

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