August 28th, 2015

IBS Match Report: N.Y. State Championships at Camillus

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship
Experience and Youth — HV Grand Agg Winner Harley Baker with Hart Trophy Winner Henry Miller.

Report by Ken Frehm
In early August, many of the nation’s best Benchrest shooters headed to New York for the N.Y. State IBS Championships and 16th Annual Pro-Am Group Shoot at the Camillus Sportsmen’s Club (located outside Syracuse, NY). For this IBS event, held August 1st and 2nd, shooters were graced with two beautiful sunny summer days. Forty sharpshooters tested their skills against each other as well as the challenging, and ever-changing winds at Camillus.

Many competitors arrived early on Friday to see if they could get a handle on the unique conditions at Camillus. Our benches, as well as our facilities, have been newly renovated and a new tree line pattern influenced the course in an entirely different way. The 100-yard matches on Saturday were quite difficult as winds gusted to 20+ miles per hour and 180-degree shifts in direction were commonplace. Getting five in one hole was difficult at best. Good-natured grumbling, head shaking and “Where did that come from?” comments were heard from some top shooters. Yet, many managed to Agg in the twos!

Camillus Complete Match Results (2-Gun, HV Grand, LV Grand, 100 & 200 Matches) (Excel File)

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

On Sunday, the second day, the 200-yard matches were blessed with less fickle winds, and some conditions that even remained constant for a very brief time. Improved groups and scores reflected the kinder conditions that Mother Nature shared with us.

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

Top Shooters at N.Y. State Group Benchrest Championships, August 1-2, 2015:

Two-Gun Aggregate HV Grand Aggregate LV Grand Aggregate
1. Brushingham, Bob 0.2762
2. Baker, Harley 0.2870
3. Dolinsky, Brian 0.3002
4. Auman, Al 0.3007
5. Reed, Tim 0.3023
1. Baker, Harley 0.2469
2. Auman, Al 0.2538
3. Reed, Tim 0.2602
4. Brushingham, Bob 0.2605
5. Peinhardt, Wyatt 0.2664
1. Brushingham, Bob 0.2919
2. Hamister, Bob 0.2941
3. Miller, Jim 0.2957
4. Mitchell, Paul 0.3063
5. Dolinsky, Brian 0.3121

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

On the line, we had three youngsters competing. 11-year-old Henry Miller (from Malden Bridge, NY) proved that you don’t have to have gray hair to have low Aggs! Henry won the Clyde Hart Trophy silver bowl. New shooters (amateurs) as well as top experts were intermingling, helping each other and sharing their experiences. Of course a lot of good-natured ribbing was overheard. Amazingly, I didn’t hear a serious complaint during the entire two-day event.

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

There were many tables set up for ammo-loading activity under the pavilions as well as in our clubhouse. A number of spouses were there to help their better halves in any way they could. Many campers were in evidence as well.

Interview with Shooters — Challenges and Great Friendships
I asked some of the competitors, “What is the hardest thing for you? … What is the most challenging? They told me: “Having the patience to wait until things are right… as well as the mental game of conditioning oneself to be strong and to be a champion.”

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

I also asked competitors: “What is the most pleasurable thing about this sport for you?” In every instance the folks I interviewed told me that the best aspect of benchrest competition was “the People”. Having relationships within the community of Benchrest folks is what is BEST — No doubt about it!

My job of roving photographer/event reporter gave me a unique opportunity to see things in a new way and to gain insights from a wide range of helpful marksmen. My most important take-away was that this group of sportsmen (and women) are friendly, helpful, and genuinely nice people. What are the secrets to winning? They will share them with you willingly! Need help? They are there!

Hardware Report — Top Guns
Harley Baker finished second overall in the Two-Gun and took the HV Grand. Baker’s rig featured a Tony Leonard Stock, Bat Action, Krieger barrel, and BixNAndy trigger. Harely shot Sta-Moly Bullets with 30 grains of Vihtavuori N133. The rifle was smithed by Jeff Peinhardt.

Jim Miller, who placed third in the Light Varmint Grand Agg, shot JW 65g bullets with 30.0 grains of N133 powder. Jim’s rifle featured a Roy Hunter Stock, March Scope, and BixNAndytrigger.

Bob Brushingham won the Two Gun Overall. Bob’s rifle, smithed by Don Beaver, featured a Panda action and Krieger barrel. Bob shot Berger 65g Bullets pushed by 28.6 grains of LT32.

IBS Benchrest Shooting Camillus New York State Championship

Many Hands Make Light the Work — Praise for the Volunteers
Many volunteers helped make the weekend a great success. Four different groups manned the golf carts that put up and took down the targets between each relay and match. Event Chairman, Bob Hamister put it all together. Volunteers from the Syracuse Police Department, as well as our club members and some of their kids joined in the effort. Camillus Club members prepared all the targets, the target boards, the moving backers and all the paraphernalia that was needed. In the clubhouse, three ladies and our club president (Bill Parfitt) manned the scoring boards, and the computers. Three ladies took over the griddle, delivering delicious food and drinks for the shooters’ breakfasts and lunches.

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August 28th, 2015

Gun Range Etiquette — 8 Tips for Safe Shooting

Gun Range Safety etiquette NRA Blog Eye Ear Protection Rules

We’ve all seen them — you know those guys who don’t follow range rules, or who handle firearms in a careless manner. Sometimes bad range etiquette is simply annoying. Other times poor gun-handling practices can be downright dangerous. The NRA Blog has published a useful article about range safety and “range etiquette”. While these tips were formulated with indoor ranges in mind, most of the points apply equally well to outdoor ranges. You may want to print out this article to provide to novice shooters at your local range or club.

8 Tips for Gun Range Etiquette

Story by Kyle Jillson for NRABlog
Here are eight tips on range etiquette to keep yourself and others safe while enjoying your day out [at the range]. Special thanks to NRA Headquarters Range General Manager Michael Johns who assisted with this article.

1. Follow the Three Fundamental Rules for Safe Gun Handling
ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.
ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.

2. Bring Safety Gear (Eye and Ear Protection)
Eye and Ear protection are MANDATORY for proper safety and health, no matter if “required” by range rules or not. It is the shooter’s responsibility to ensure proper protection is secured and used prior to entering/using any range. Hearing loss can be instantaneous and permanent in some cases. Eyesight can be ruined in an instant with a catastrophic firearm failure.

Gun Range Safety etiquette NRA Blog Eye Ear Protection Rules

3. Carry a Gun Bag or Case
Common courtesy and general good behavior dictates that you bring all firearms to a range unloaded and cased and/or covered. No range staff appreciates a stranger walking into a range with a “naked” firearm whose loaded/unloaded condition is not known. You can buy a long gun sock or pistol case for less than $10.

4. Know Your Range’s Rules
Review and understand any and all “range specific” rules/requirements/expectations set forth by your range. What’s the range’s maximum rate of fire? Are you allowed to collect your brass? Are you required to take a test before you can shoot? Don’t be afraid to ask the staff questions or tell them it’s your first time. They’re there to help.

5. Follow ALL Range Officer instructions
ROs are the first and final authority on any range and their decisions are generally final. Arguing/debating with a Range Officer is both in poor taste and may just get you thrown out depending on circumstances.

6. Don’t Bother Others or Touch Their Guns
Respect other shooters’ privacy unless a safety issue arises. Do NOT engage other shooters to correct a perceived safety violation unless absolutely necessary – inform the RO instead. Shooters have the right and responsibility to call for a cease fire should a SERIOUS safety event occur. Handling/touching another shooter’s firearm without their permission is a major breech of protocol. Offering unsolicited “training” or other instructional suggestions to other shooters is also impolite.

7. Know What To Do During a Cease Fire
IMMEDIATELY set down your firearm, pointed downrange, and STEP AWAY from the shooting booth (or bench). The Range Officer(s) on duty will give instructions from that point and/or secure all firearms prior to going downrange if needed. ROs do not want shooters trying to “secure/unload” their firearms in a cease fire situation, possibly in a stressful event; they want the shooters separated from their guns instantly so that they can then control the situation as they see fit.

8. Clean Up After Yourself
Remember to take down your old targets, police your shooting booth, throw away your trash, and return any equipment/chairs, etc. Other people use the range too; no one wants to walk up to a dirty lane.

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