April 14th, 2016

Master Class Low-Profile F-Open Stock by Bernosky

Master Class F-Open low profile Stock Carl Bernosky

Most shooters know Carl Bernosky as a 10-time National High Power Rifle champion. But you may not realize that Carl is also a very talented stock-maker and rifle-builder. Carl crafts a wide variety of wood and wood laminate stocks for competition as well as hunting. He also crafts many stocks for Alex Sitman of Master Class Stocks.

Master Class Low-Profile F-Open Stock
Here is a new Master Class Low-Profile F-Open Stock crafted by Carl Bernosky. It is made from a Cherry/Maple wood laminate. This design features a railed fore-end along with a flat, parallel toe for improved tracking and stability on the bags. The front section of the fore-arm has a low profile. This allows the barrel bore axis to ride lower. That helps reduce hop and helps the gun recoil straight back. For more information on this low-profile F-Open stock design, visit Carl Bernosky’s Facebook Page and MasterClassStocks.com.

Master Class F-Open low profile Stock Carl Bernosky

Note that the stock maintains full depth under the action and quite a few inches forward of the action. This smart design feature is very important. We have seen other low-profile stock designs that can flex or “hinge” forward of the action because there’s not enough wood material there. In fact, the only part of the stock that needs a cut-down profile is the front 10″ or so, where the stock actually rides the front bag.

Master Class F-Open low profile Stock Carl Bernosky

This particular stock features a “pop-off” magnetic cheekpiece, as well as a buttplate that adjusts for Length of Pull (LOP) via spacers. The action is by Pierce Engineering. This and other Master Class Stock designs can be customized with other features on request.

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April 14th, 2016

Good Concealed Carry Holster — The Clinger Atom

Clinger Atom Holster

Many of our readers have concealed carry permits. When carrying a handgun concealed, holster choice is key. A good holster will carry more comfortably, “print” less, and be 100% secure while still allowing rapid access. Our systems admin Jay C. recently acquired a Walther PPS M2 as a carry gun. Jay has a CCW permit, and he sometimes chooses to carry a concealed handgun, particularly on trips.

After looking at many options, Jay chose a Kydex Clinger ATom Holster. These are very affordable, yet they have many great features. The most important design feature of the $19.99 Clinger Atom is the location of the belt clip. This is placed over the trigger guard area, not the slide. This pulls the grip in closer than if the clip was mounted over the slide as on other holsters. This smart design feature really works, improving concealment and comfort. Jay says: “the Atom works great with my little Walther — it’s very stable and comfortable.”

Clinger Atom Holster

The $19.99 Clinger Atom also offers adjustable “ride height”. This is accomplished by moving the belt clip up or down. Holster retention (the clamping tightness) is easily adjusted with a simple hex screw.

Along with its popular Atom holster, Clinger offers two other holsters: 1) the $29.99 Stingray model (with choice of 0°, 15°, or 30° cant); and 2) the dual-clip, ultra-thin No-Print Wonder Holster priced at $59.99. The latter is a good choice for carrying a heavier pistol for long periods. All three holsters (Atom, Stingray, No Print Wonder) are shown in the video above.

Clinger offers a Zero-Risk Guarantee. Try any Clinger holster for two weeks. If you don’t like it, you can return it for a full refund. There is also a “Bumper-To-Bumper Lifetime Warranty”. If anything on your Clinger Holster ever needs repair the manufacturer will repair it or replace it for free.

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April 14th, 2016

Weaver vs. Picatinny Scope Rails

Picatinny Rail specifications 1913 Mil-std

Readers often ask “What’s the difference between a Weaver scope rail and a Picatinny Rail?” The answer is not as simple as it seems. The dimensions of a Picatinny Rail should be consistent (from one rail-maker to another), since there IS a government spec. Conversely, there is some variance in “Weaver-style” rails. The width of the groove is the most important difference between Picatinny Rails and weaver rails. “Mil-spec” Picatinny rails will have a grove width of 0.206″ while Weaver rails typically have a narrower, 0.180″ groove width.

Brownell’s has a helpful GunTech™ Article that discusses the Picatinny Rail vs. Weaver Rail. That article explains:

“What are the differences between the ‘Picatinny’ and the ‘Weaver’ systems? The profile of the two systems is virtually identical. Depending on the quality of the machining done by the manufacturer, the two systems should be indistinguishable from the profile. The key difference lies in the placement of the recoil grooves and with width of the grooves. MIL-STD-1913 (Picatinny) grooves are .206″ wide and have a center-to-center width of .394”. The placement of these grooves has to be consistent in order for it to be a true ‘Picatinny’MIL-STD system. Weaver systems have a .180” width of recoil groove and are not necessarily consistent in a center-to-center measurement from one groove to the next.

In many instances, a Weaver system has a specific application that it is machined for, so interchangeability is not necessarily an issue. A MIL-STD-1913 system must adhere to the specifications listed above in order for it to be considered MIL-STD, since the military desires uniformity in the recoil grooves to allow for different systems to be mounted on the weapon with no concern for compatibility.

Now, what does this mean to you? Boiled down, it means that accessories designed for a Weaver system will, in most cases, fit on a ‘Picatinny’ system. The reverse, however, is probably not the case. Due to the larger recoil groove, ‘Picatinny’ accessories will not fit a Weaver system. There are, of course, exceptions to every rule, but for a good rule-of-thumb, [full-width] ‘Picatinny’ won’t fit Weaver, but Weaver will fit ‘Picatinny’.”

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