August 21st, 2016

New Adjustable Cheek Piece using Eliseo Tubegun Parts

Eliseo Tube gun Tubegun cheekpiece cheek piece comb adjustable gunsmithing Water Cam

Forum member Mike T. (aka “Watercam”), has cleverly adapted a tubegun cheek piece to conventional fiberglass and wood stocks. The cheek piece hardware comes from Competition Machine and is the same as used on Gary Eliseo’s tubegun stocks. Here is Watercam’s Project Report:

Installing Tubegun Cheek Piece on Conventional Gun Stock
All of my match rifles are equipped with thumb-wheel adjustable cheek pieces for the best of reasons — adjustments can be made while in position, on target. I’ve learned that variations in position, terrain, and vertical angle all demand adjustability to achieve optimal cheek weld.

I wanted a cheek piece for my hunting and tactical type stocks that gave the same adjustability without having to cut a chunk off of my butt stocks. It needed to be affordable and easy to install. I also wanted a unit that would not push my head laterally away from the centerline of the scope or iron sights. Turns out I already had what I needed on my Gary Eliseo B-1 tubegun. I ran the idea past Gary, who said: “If you’ll be the guinea pig I’ll send the hardware”.

Using Gary’s hardware, I mounted Eliseo alloy thumb-wheel adjustable cheek pieces on a Bell & Carlson Medalist hunting stock and a Boyd’s laminate tactical stock. Read Forum Discussion.

Building Version One on Bell & Calson Stock
I had a Bell & Carlson Medalist stock for a Mauser 98 chambered in 9.3×62. This test rifle was enough of a thumper to reveal if the metal cheek piece could handle strong recoil.

Eliseo Tube gun Tubegun cheekpiece cheek piece comb adjustable gunsmithing Water Cam

I started by drilling three 1/2″ holes into the top of the comb to match the two pillars and one threaded shaft on the cheek piece. I used aluminum tubing to make guides for each and epoxied them in place. Inletting the oval hole for the thumb wheel was reasonably straight forward and the fiber reinforced foam in the buttstock offered enough support. A large flat washer epoxied underneath where the thumbwheel lay gave a smooth bearing surface. Total adjustment (with 2.25″ pillars and shafts) is just about an inch. I chose to trim the bottom of the skirt of Gary’s cheek plate so as to allow better position behind the scope for me and allow maximum adjustment even with the cheek piece of the stock. Set screws could be used instead of the thumb-wheel or in conjunction with it. In the end it was exactly what I envisioned and works great! The only thing left to do is paint the metal to match the stock.

Version Two — Installed on Boyds Laminated Tactical Stock
Watercam’s second metal cheek piece installation was on a laminated tactical stock. This Boyds stock did have a movable comb, but the original adjustable cheek section was too awkward to adjust from position. So I adapted the Eliseo cheek piece to to the Boyds stock, as you can see:

Eliseo Tube gun Tubegun cheekpiece cheek piece comb adjustable gunsmithing Water Cam

Eliseo Tube gun Tubegun cheekpiece cheek piece comb adjustable gunsmithing Water Cam

Cheek piece installation for both stocks was straight-forward, and the new cheek pieces work every bit as well the systems on my match rifles. Aluminum tubes epoxied in place guide the rods and threaded shank. A matching-diameter flat washer epoxied under the wheel provides smooth bearing surface. The glass-filled filler of the butt stock is plenty strong enough to support the unit. A set screw and knob can be added to lock in changes if so desired.

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August 21st, 2016

Kirsten Joy Weiss Shoots Pop-Its Miniature Exploding Targets

Kirsten Joy Weiss trick shot pop-its Volquartsen YouTube Video

Our friend Kirsten Joy Weiss is a modern-day Annie Oakley. A very successful competitive shooter in the collegiate ranks, Kirsten now produces a popular YouTube Channel focusing on the “Joy of Shooting”. In her videos, Kirsten offers shooting tips and performs a variety of trick shots — such as splitting cards with a .22 LR rimfire. This young lady can shoot, that’s for sure.

In this video, Kirsten shoots at some tiny reactive targets — “Pop-Its”. These pea-sized targets “pop” audibly when hit. They make a very challenging target, even when bunched together. Kirsten secured three (3) Pop-Its with a clothespin, and then placed the clothespin in the ground.

It took a couple tries, but Kirsten did manage to light off a Pop-It or two. Kirsten reports: “Basically a small exploding target, Pop-Its, also known as ‘Bang Snaps’, snaps, snappers, party snaps, etc., are a fun firework trick noisemaker — but will they make a good target? Let’s put it to the test to see if these poppers are gun range-worthy targets. These little Pop-Its make for some challenging shots with reactive targets.” Enjoy the video:

Kirsten Joy Weiss trick shot pop-its Volquartsen YouTube Video

Equipment Report: For this video, Kirsten shot Lapua .22 LR ammo in a Volquartsen Ultra-lite semi-auto .22 LR rimfire rifle, fitted with a C-More Red-Dot sight. She was using Oakley eye protection.

Kirsten Joy Weiss trick shot pop-its Volquartsen YouTube Video

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August 21st, 2016

History of Firearms Covered in Online Video Series

Sturm, Ruger & Co. has created a series of 11 short videos that trace the history of firearms, from matchlocks to modern semi-autos. Ruger’s “History of the Gun” video series provides a fascinating look at firearms technology throughout the years. The host is Garry James, Senior Editor of Guns & Ammo magazine. Featured here is Segment 7 on Rifling. Other installments in the series are linked below.

Flintlock mechanism
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