September 5th, 2016

Nikon Introduces New High-End Monarch ED Spotting Scopes

Nikon Monarch Spotting Scope ED HD low dispersion Apochromat

If you’re in the market for a premium spotting scope, it’s time to consider Nikon again. In recent years the “best you can get” were offered by the likes of Kowa, Swarovski, and Zeiss. Now Nikon has released its first-ever Monarch line of spotting scopes with ED low-dispersion, apochromatic glass. And the price will be very competitive — around $1600.00 MSRP for the 82mm version. Nikon says its new Monarch Spotters “are being offered at a price point that is virtually unrivaled for this level of optical quality”.

Key Features of New Nikon Monarch Spotting Scopes

  • Advanced Apochromat Optical System with ED (extra-low dispersion) glass minimizes chromatic aberration.
  • Field Flattener Lens System provides consistent sharpness across the entire field of view, all the way to the periphery.
  • Dual-speed focusing system offers fine action for focusing on distant subjects and coarser action for nearby subjects.
  • Bright and clear view is achieved with a total reflection prism. Straight models use a Porro prism, while angled-type models employ Nikon’s original prism.

Nikon Monarch Spotting Scope ED HD low dispersion Apochromat

Apochromat ED Glass Minimizes Chromatic Aberration
As with other premium spotting scopes, the Monarch boasts ED (low-dispersion) glass. Nikon’s Apochromat ED glass dramatically reduces chromatic aberration which causes “color fringing”. This fringing is particularly noticeable at long range when viewing targets — you’ll see color bands at the edges — blue on one side and red on the other. Nikon’s advanced Apochromat ED glass corrects not only chromatic aberrations or red, blue, and green but also violet chromatic aberration to the furthest limits of the visible light range. This results in much greater contrast and sharpness when viewing objects at long range. Honest guys, having ED glass makes a real difference when trying to see bullet holes at long range.

Nikon has also developed a new lens technology that keeps the image sharp all the way out to the periphery. Nikon call this the “Field Flattener System”. It works by compensating for Field Curvature:

Nikon Monarch Spotting Scope ED HD low dispersion Apochromat

Choose 82mm or 60mm with Three Monarch Eyepieces
Customers will have the choice of 60mm or 82mm objective sizes and a straight or angled Fieldscope body. Monarch Fieldscopes come with Monarch Eyepiece (MEP) 20-60 (20-60x w/ 82 series and 16-48x w/ 60 series). Two additional eyepiece options are MEP 38W (38x w/82 series and 30x w/ 60 series) and MEP 30-60W (30-60x w/ 82 series and 24-48x w/ 60 series). All eyepieces feature a Type 1 Bayonet Mount for swift attachment/detachment.

The suggested retail prices for all MONARCH FIELDSCOPE options will be as follows:

20-60×82 ED Straight Body $1599.95 | 20-60×82 ED Angled Body $1599.95
16-48×60 ED Straight Body $1399.95 | 16-48×60 ED Angled Body $1399.95

MONARCH MEP Eyepieces MEP-38W $299.95
MONARCH MEP Eyepieces MEP-20-60 $299.95
MONARCH MEP Eyepieces MEP-30-60W $549.95

Nikon Monarch Spotting Scope ED HD low dispersion Apochromat

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September 5th, 2016

SSG Sherri Gallagher — How to Read the Wind Video

Reading Wind Sherri Gallagher

Sgt Sherri GallagherThe ability to read the wind is what separates good shooters from great shooters. If you want to learn wind-doping from one of the best, watch this video with 2010 National High Power Champion (and U.S. Army 2010 Soldier of the Year) Sherri Gallagher. Part of the USAMU’s Pro Tips Video Series, this video covers the basics of wind reading including: Determining wind direction and speed, Bracketing Wind, Reading Mirage, and Adjusting to cross-winds using both sight/scope adjustments and hold-off methods. Correctly determining wind angle is vital, Sheri explains, because a wind at a 90-degree angle has much more of an effect on bullet lateral movement than a headwind or tailwind. Wind speed, of course, is just as important as wind angle. To calculate wind speed, Sherri recommends “Wind Bracketing”: [This] is where you take the estimate of the highest possible condition and the lowest possible condition and [then] take the average of the two.”

It is also important to understand mirage. Sheri explains that “Mirage is the reflection of light through layers of air, based off the temperature of the ground. These layers … are blown by the wind, and can be monitored through a spotting scope to detect direction and speed. You can see what appears to be waves running across the range — this is mirage.” To best evaluate mirage, you need to set your spotting scope correctly. First get the target in sharp focus, then (on most scopes), Sheri advises that you turn your adjustment knob “a quarter-turn counter-clockwise. That will make the mirage your primary focus.”

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