April 30th, 2017

Ruger Offers Integrally Suppressed Barrel for 10/22 Rifles

Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

Even seen an integrally suppressed rifle? Ruger offers this technology with its new Silent-SR ISB, a multi-baffle integrally suppressed barrel (ISB) for Ruger 10/22 takedown models. This system reduces sound levels to an average of 113.2 dB with standard velocity ammunition. That’s very impressive — consider that an unsuppressed .22 LR firearm can produce noise levels as high as 140 dB with standard velocity ammunition. That’s well above the threshold where irreversible hearing damage begins. (Source: NC Silencers).

Even if you are not interested in a suppressed rimfire rifle (or live in a state where suppressors are forbidden) we think you’ll be interested in Ruger’s technology. The Silent-SR employs a long, multi-element “baffle stack” that can be easily removed for cleaning.

Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

Watch Integrally Suppressed Barrel in Action. CLICK HERE to View Video on Ruger Site. Scroll to bottom of Ruger page after jump!
Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

Here’s what Ruger says about its new ISB (Integrally Suppressed Barrel) for the 10/22 Take-down:

The Silent-SR ISB quickly and easily assembles to any Ruger 10/22 Takedown or 22 Charger Takedown, and features an induction-hardened breech with cold hammer-forged barrel that provide easy takedown and accurate return-to-zero.

Reducing sound pressure levels of .22 LR to an average of 113.2 dB with standard velocity ammunition, a 10/22 Takedown rifle equipped with the Silent-SR ISB is as quiet as a bolt-action rifle with a thread-on silencer. The relatively long barrel of the Silent-SR ISB (compared to other integral suppressors) means the bullet generates energy near that of a 16″ gun for consistent, accurate and effective performance on target. The pushed-cone baffle geometry has been stretched to utilize the volume under the barrel maximizing suppression of the gunshot without disturbing the travel of the bullet.

Integrally suppressed barrel .22 LR rimfire 10/22 takedown ISB Silent SR

Disassembly for cleaning is as simple as separating the barrel from your firearm and loosening the Silent-SR ISB’s single assembly screw using the included 5/32″ hex key tool. Once loose, pull the screw to remove all six 17-4 stainless steel baffles, spacer and front cap free of the sleeve for cleaning. The sealed baffles keep the fouling away from the serialized sleeve, yet easily come apart even after thousands of rounds. Finished with Cerakote, the Silent-SR ISB is engineered and built for a lifetime of hard use without clogged ports, seized components or loss of suppression that often plague other integrally suppressed rimfire barrels.

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, New Product 4 Comments »
April 30th, 2017

New Steyr Scout RFR Rimfire Rifle with Straight-Pull Action

Steyr Arms Rimfire Scout Rifle .22 LR, .22 WMR, 17 HRM straight pull action

Steyr Arms has introduced a new straight-pull rimfire rifle that should work well for rimfire practical/tactical games, cross-training, and varmint hunting. Available in three chamberings, .22 LR, .22 WMR, and .17 HMR, the new Steyr Scout RFR emulates the look of a Scout Rifle, but in a rimfire platform. This rifle, which first appeared in 2016 in Europe, made its American debut at the NRA Annual Meetings in Atlanta this week.

Steyr Arms Rimfire Scout Rifle .22 LR, .22 WMR, 17 HRM straight pull action

Frankly, we don’t need or want the extended forward-mounted rail, because we would use a conventional higher-magnification optic, rather than a long-eye-relief scout scope. But we are excited about the straight-pull action, 10-round magazine, and nicely-designed stock that should be good for tactical comps. For mounting conventional scopes, an integrated 3/8-inch dovetail base runs the full length of the receiver’s topside, and the RPR comes with Weaver bases mounted on the top of the receiver. MSRP is $599.00.

Detail showing ISSC Biathlon-style SPA straight-pull action with trigger-guard safety.
Steyr Arms Rimfire Scout Rifle .22 LR, .22 WMR, 17 HRM straight pull action

Based on the proven, biathlon-inspired SPA action built by Austrian gun-maker ISSC, the Steyr Scout RFR was designed as an economical, minimal-recoil trainer. Available in .22 LR, .22 WMR, and .17 HMR, the Scout RFR has a smooth, straight-pull action allowing for fast cycling with the provided 10-round magazine. Check out the video below to see how the action works. Trigger pull weight is 3 lbs, 4 oz., about right for tactical games. We might want a slightly lighter trigger for varmint work with the .17 HMR version. In fact, we think this might make a great “squirrel gun” in .17 HMR.

The Scout RFR’s Eloxal-coated aluminum receiver secures a 20″ heavy-contour barrel. Both the .17 HMR and .22 LR barrels are 1/2-20 UNF threaded for attachments, while the .22 WMR barrel is unthreaded. The Scout RFR measures 35.6 inches long, and it weighs 7.3 pounds without optics. An optional knife stows in the stock, and standard Steyr SBS/Scout buttplate spacers can used to adjust length-of-pull. Included accessories: Owner’s manual, two Weaver adapters, and one 10-round magazine.

Model: Steyr Scout RFR

Chamberings: .22 LR, .22 WMR, and .17 HMR
Action: Straight-pull, biathlon-style SPA action by ISSC
Magazine type/capacity: 10-round detachable steel box
Receiver material: Hard Eloxal-coated aircraft aluminum
Barrel: 20.1-inch heavy barrel
Sight Mounts: 30-slot Picatinny rail + 3/8″ dovetail on receiver with two Weaver adapters
Trigger Pull weight: 3 pounds, 4 ounces
Stock Length of pull: 13.4 inches, adjustable with spacers
Recoil pad: Elastomer 0.3″ thick
Weight, empty: 7.3 pounds
Overall length: 35.6 inches
MSRP: $599

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, New Product, Tactical 3 Comments »
April 30th, 2017

Wind Wizardry for Varminters — Keep the Wind at Your Back

Varmint Hunting varmint safari wind war wagon trailer longmeadow game resort
This impressive war wagon hauls varmint hunters around the Longmeadow Game Resort in Colorado.

When you’re on a varmint expedition in the Western states you can bet, sooner or later, you’ll encounter serious winds. Here’s some advice on how to minimize the effects of cross-winds on your shooting, and easily improve your percentage of hits. In essence, you want to use your ability to change shooting positions and angles to put the wind behind you.

A benchrest or High Power shooter must operate from a designated shooting position. He must stay put and deal with the wind as it moves across the course, from whatever direction it blows. By contrast, a varmint hunter can move around and choose the spot that provides the most favorable wind direction. In most cases you’ll get the best results by moving your shooting position so the wind is at your back. This will minimize horizontal wind drift. Once you’re in position, use wind flags to direct your fire in line with the prevailing winds. A varminter who calls himself “Catshooter” explains:

The String of Death
I remember the first time I was on a dog town in the Conata Basin, in the Badlands area of southwestern South Dakota. Along with two other guys, I drove out for 21 days of shooting, and I never saw wind like that before. If all four tires of our vehicle were on the ground, the weather man said these were “mild wind conditions”.

After the first four or five days, we got smart. We would park the truck on the up-wind side of the town so the wind was at our back. Then we took a piece of string on a 3-foot stick, and set it in front of the shooters, and let the string point at the mounds that we were going to shoot.

For the rest of the trip, we didn’t have to deal with wind drift at all. We just shot the dogs that the string pointed to. We started calling our simple wind pointer the “String of Death”.

We were hitting dogs at distances that I would not repeat here (with benchrest grade rifles). After the first time out, I always took a wind rig like that.

Photos by Chris Long, taken during Chris’s Wyoming Varmint Hunt with Trophy Ridge Outfitters.

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, Shooting Skills 3 Comments »