August 9th, 2017

Talented Yank Shines at Canadian Silhouette Championship

Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

American Silhouette shooter Eric Mietenkorte delivered a superb performance at the recent Canadian National Silhouette Championships in Fort Steel, British Columbia. Eric recorded a 1-2-3 Trifecta with 1st Place in Master Standard Rifle, 2nd Place in Master Hunter Rifle, and 3rd place in Master Smallbore Hunter. Eric is coming home with quite the trophy harvest. Other top shooters included Team Lapua members Mark Pharr and Cathy Winstead-Severin.

Erich called this a “target rich environment”…
Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships
Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

Eric tells us: “The Canadian National Championships are all wrapped up. Thanks to the Bull River Shooters Association (B.R.S.A.) for hosting an incredible event! What a great [week] of shooting! Such a beautiful range with the nicest people! It was great seeing old friends and making new ones. [There were] definitely some challenging wind and mirage conditions, but lots of great shooting, and I even took home some hardware.” Erich has posted these photos from the event.

Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

Erich was quick on the trigger shooting pigs at 300 meters. He says “I love hearing that clang from hitting the steel.” Click speaker icon to hear audio.

6.5mm Chamberings Favored for Centerfire (High Power) Silhouette
The 6.5mm caliber seems to be the “sweet spot” for High Power Silhouette shooters. Erich says: “I use the .260 Bobcat (6.5×250) wildcat. Most still use the .260 Remington and 6.5×47 Lapua.” Other popular chamberings for High Power Silhouette include the 6.5 Creedmoor, 6mmBR, 6mm Dasher, 6×47 Lapua, and 7mm-08.

One wicked cool paint job — the Fighter Plane graphics on Erich’s smallbore rifle drew admiring glances.

Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

Here Erich spots for fellow American shooters Mark Pharr and Cathy Winstead-Severin of Team Lapua.

Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

The Cranbrook Daily Townsman News did a nice story on the Championships, complete with this informative video.

Fort Steel in British Columbia is a beautiful venue. Stunning scenery all around…

Erich Mietenkorte Silhouette Rifle Canada Canadian Championships

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August 9th, 2017

Range Etiquette — Proper Practices to Follow at Gun Ranges

Gun Range Safety etiquette NRA Blog Eye Ear Protection Rules

There are important safety and behavior rules you need to follow at a gun range. Sometimes bad range etiquette is simply annoying. Other times poor gun-handling practices can be downright dangerous. The NRA Blog has published a useful article about range safety and “range etiquette”. While these tips were formulated with indoor ranges in mind, most of the points apply equally well to outdoor ranges. You may want to print out this article to provide to novice shooters at your local range or club.

8 Tips for Gun Range Etiquette

Story by Kyle Jillson for NRABlog
Here are eight tips on range etiquette to keep yourself and others safe while enjoying your day out [at the range]. Special thanks to NRA Headquarters Range General Manager Michael Johns who assisted with this article.

1. Follow the Three Fundamental Rules for Safe Gun Handling
ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.
ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.
ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.

This NSSF Video Covers Basic Gun Range Safety Rules:

2. Bring Safety Gear (Eye and Ear Protection)
Eye and Ear protection are MANDATORY for proper safety and health, no matter if “required” by range rules or not. It is the shooter’s responsibility to ensure proper protection is secured and used prior to entering/using any range. Hearing loss can be instantaneous and permanent in some cases. Eyesight can be ruined in an instant with a catastrophic firearm failure.

Gun Range Safety etiquette NRA Blog Eye Ear Protection Rules

3. Carry a Gun Bag or Case
Common courtesy and general good behavior dictates that you bring all firearms to a range unloaded and cased and/or covered. No range staff appreciates a stranger walking into a range with a “naked” firearm whose loaded/unloaded condition is not known. You can buy a long gun sock or pistol case for less than $10.

4. Know Your Range’s Rules
Review and understand any and all “range specific” rules/requirements/expectations set forth by your range. What’s the range’s maximum rate of fire? Are you allowed to collect your brass? Are you required to take a test before you can shoot? Don’t be afraid to ask the staff questions or tell them it’s your first time. They’re there to help.

5. Follow ALL Range Officer instructions
ROs are the first and final authority on any range and their decisions are generally final. Arguing/debating with a Range Officer is both in poor taste and may just get you thrown out depending on circumstances.

6. Don’t Bother Others or Touch Their Guns
Respect other shooters’ privacy unless a safety issue arises. Do NOT engage other shooters to correct a perceived safety violation unless absolutely necessary – inform the RO instead. Shooters have the right and responsibility to call for a cease fire should a SERIOUS safety event occur. Handling/touching another shooter’s firearm without their permission is a major breech of protocol. Offering unsolicited “training” or other instructional suggestions to other shooters is also impolite.

7. Know What To Do During a Cease Fire
IMMEDIATELY set down your firearm, pointed downrange, and STEP AWAY from the shooting booth (or bench). The Range Officer(s) on duty will give instructions from that point and/or secure all firearms prior to going downrange if needed. ROs do not want shooters trying to “secure/unload” their firearms in a cease fire situation, possibly in a stressful event; they want the shooters separated from their guns instantly so that they can then control the situation as they see fit.

8. Clean Up After Yourself
Remember to take down your old targets, police your shooting booth, throw away your trash, and return any equipment/chairs, etc. Other people use the range too; no one wants to walk up to a dirty lane.

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August 9th, 2017

Ian Kelbly Guests on Kelly McMillan’s Taking Stock Radio Show

Kelly McMilland Taking Stock Radio Show Voice America

Mark your calendar guys — you’ll want to tune in to Kelly McMillan’s Taking Stock Radio Show this Friday, August 11, 2017. The broadcast will feature Ian Kelbly of Kelbly’s, one of the leading purveyors of custom actions and precision match rifles. Ian Kelbly knew he’d end up in the firearms industry when he was seven years old and wanted to be like his Grandfather, who started Kelbly’s in 1981 in North Lawrence, Ohio. Over 50 world records have been set with Kelbly’s products in just the last ten years.

On the radio show, Ian will talk about new Kelbly actions, and Kelbly’s new products for PRS and other tactical competitions. Kelbly’s is one of the founding sponsors of the National Rifle League, a new non-profit organization that is offering an alternative to PRS. Eight major NRL matches will be held this year.

Along with Ian Kelbly, Kelly McMillan will also interview Nick ‘Beard’ Owens of Owens Armory. Once Nick started building rifles, word of mouth led to Owens Armory being established. As the business grew, Nick’s buddy Felipe Tomas Meraz came to Arizona to join the team. Owens and Meraz, a PRS competitor who also recently attended the King of 2 Miles (K02M) event in Raton, NM, will talk about Extreme Long Range and K02M competition.

The Radio show runs 3/31/2017 at 11:00 AM Pacific Time on VoiceAmerica Sports Channel

CLICK HERE to Launch Radio Show Past Episodes (Warning — Loud Audio Starts Immediately)

About McMillan Fiberglass Stocks
Kelly McMillan is the president of McMillan Fiberglass Stocks (MFS). This company began in 1973 whn Gale McMillan starting crafting benchrest stocks at home in his carport/garage. In 1975 MFS hired its first employee, Kelly McMillan.

By 1979 Kelly was made a partner, and by 1984 Kelly was in charge of running the stock shop. Since that time MFS has continued to grow with innovation and design. Today McMillan Fiberglass Stocks has a 15,000 sq. ft. facility and 65 employees. MFS manufactures around 12,000 stocks per year, most of which are individual customers ordering one custom built stock at a time.

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