November 21st, 2017

High-Tech Gun Case with Protective Air-Chamber Cushioning

Air Armor Tech Rifle Case inflatable tactical gun carrier
The Air Armor Tech Long Gun Case (LGC) holds multiple firearms up to 52″ OAL. When deflated, the 8-lb LGC stows in a 18″ x 9″ diameter roll. The LGC easily holds two long rifles with optics. The LGC comes complete with internal tie-downs for rifle and pistol, plus external shoulder straps for field carry.

Here’s something new and clever — a gun case with inflatable air chambers to protect the rifle. This definitely could have benefits for hunters and tactical shooters. This new Air Armor Tech military-grade gun case was recently tested by American Rifleman magazine. This gun case was developed by Blaine “Rock” Tompkins, a retired fighter pilot.

Air Armor Tech Rifle Case inflatable tactical gun carrier

American Rifleman’s tester liked the product: “Typical foam-filled soft cases are inexpensive but don’t offer all that much padding. While hard cases provide more protection, they are bulky and take up a lot of storage space. Air Armor Tech’s inflatable gun cases … provide plenty of padding while being lightweight and easy to store. The three-pipe inflation system allows both of the 3-inch-thick (when fully inflated) air bladders to be quickly inflated.” Air Armor Tech offers two sizes, the Long Gun Case (LGC) that holds guns up to 52″ OAL, and the Mid-Length Gun Case (MLGC) that holds firearms up to 42″ OAL.

Air Armor Tech Rifle Case inflatable tactical gun carrier

Air Armor Tech’s cases aren’t cheap — the LGC is $549 while the smaller MLGC is $499 — but when you consider your investment in rifle and optics, maybe this makes sense, particularly for hunters. Inside the bag are twin air bladders (see photo above) that cushion your guns. When deflated, the Air Armor Tech case can be rolled into a something the size of a sleeping bag.

Here are three videos that show the Air Armor Tech case works — and how it even floats. This air-cushioned bag definitely offers added protection for expensive firearms and optics.

Air Armor Tech Gun Case Features

Air Armor Tech Case on River Trip

Air Armor Tech Extended Field Test Report

“Air Armor Tech sent me a military grade inflatable rifle case to review. I’ve been using it for a couple of months on hunting trips, trips to the range and just about anything else I take a rifle or shotgun to. After using it for months, I can state without hesitation that the Air Armor Tech rifle and shotgun case is the toughest, lightest, handiest and best-made rifle case I have ever owned. It also protects my long guns better than anything I have ever tried. Besides, it even floats.” — Gun Guy, 09/25/17

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November 21st, 2017

With Increased Production, Rimfire Ammo Prices Drop

Rimfire Ammo prices ammunition .22 LR supply CCI Lewiston
Image by Dean Weingarten, GunWatch Blog.

It’s the “good old days” again for rimfire ammo buyers. A new 37,000-square-foot CCI rimfire production facility is running in Lewiston, Idaho. And demand has dropped. That all translates to greater .22 LR ammunition availability, and much lower prices. You can now find “big name” American-made .22 LR at $2.20/box levels — that’s just 4.4 cents per round. See AMMO PRICES HERE.

Dean Weingarten explains: “The new .22 rimfire plant in Lewiston, Idaho, is online. Vista Outdoor, which owns the CCI and Federal brands, has increased rimfire production for both brands by 20 percent (20%). And demand is dropping. With end of the Obama administration, the .22 ammunition bubble is deflating. Most stores have ammunition available. Prices are coming down.”

From the Lewiston Tribune, November 10th, 2017:

Vista Outdoor recently debuted a new, 37,000-square-foot, $35 million rimfire ammunition plant near the Lewiston-Nez Perce County Regional Airport, which has resulted in what company officials describe as a “very satisfying” reduction in the time needed to complete an order.

Vista Outdoor has reduced ammunition prices to maintain market share as its customers work through stockpiles they amassed under the administration of Barack Obama — when they feared new regulation that never came to pass: “We’re the market leader in rimfire. Brand preference in ammunition tends to be somewhat sticky. It took us a long time to gain our market share. … We are loathe to cede that during a period of challenging pricing because it’s going to be very difficult to get that back.”

The Ammo Supply and Demand Cycle

Commentary by Dean Weingarten, GunWatch Blog
The ammunition manufacturers, such as Vista Outdoors, do not want to lower prices. As with any manufacturer, life is easy and smooth when both prices and demand are high. But the market does not guarantee that prices and demand will remain high. Only force, in the form of government granted monopolies, or collusion, as with the OPEC cartel, can do that. Neither of those things exist in the United States, where a mostly free market in ammunition is enforced.

The CCI and Federal brands have an enviable reputation for reliability and quality. They have customer loyalty because of that. [But there is pressure from the competition…]

.22 LR 22LR rimfire ammunition ammo best price

Aguila Nearly Doubled Production, Resulting in Lower Prices
Market competition works. Aguila of Mexico saw opportunity and increased its production before Vista Outdoors did. Aguila almost doubled its production to capture some of the increasing American market. That is reflected in the availability and price structure seen today. Aguila’s brands are at the lowest price point in the market. Vista has to reduce prices to keep market share. Federal low price brands are in direct competition with Aguila. The lowest prices are now at 3.7 – 4 cents per round.

Prices are going to continue to fall. If you look at the prices on the old Remington box, it was purchased on sale at less than two cents per round. I will not be surprised if we see prices at or below two cents per round, at sporadic sales, before the end of President Trump’s term.

Shopping TIP: For Rock-Bottom Prices Check Estate Sales
For those looking for even lower prices, look for estate sales. Prices of ammunition at estate sales are going to be in the basement. Because of liability, gun stores will not buy ammunition back from private owners. Many people who inherit ammunition are afraid of it, know nothing about guns, and want to get rid of it. I have heard of thousands of dollars of ammunition being turned in to police to be destroyed.

See Rimfire Ammo Production at CCI Factory

©2017 by Dean Weingarten: Permission to share is granted when this notice is included.

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November 21st, 2017

Minute of Angle (MOA) Explained by Informative Video

one minute of angle

This popular video, viewed over 1.1 million times on YouTube, provides a clear explanation of Minute of Angle (MOA) and how that angular measurement is used. Among novice shooters, there is much confusion over this term. In this NSSF Video, Ryan Cleckner, a former Sniper Instructor for the 1st Ranger Battalion, defines the term, “Minute of Angle” (MOA) and explains how you can adjust for windage and elevation using 1/4 or 1/8 MOA clicks on your scope. This allows you to sight-in precisely and compensate for bullet drop at various distances.

For starters, Ryan explains that, when talking about angular degrees, a “minute” is simply 1/60th. So a “Minute of Angle” is simply 1/60th of one degree of a central angle, measured either up and down (for elevation) or side to side (for windage). At 100 yards, 1 MOA equals 1.047″ on the target. This is often rounded to one inch for simplicity. Say, for example, you click up 1 MOA. That is roughly 1 inch at 100 yards, or roughly 4 inches at 400 yards, since the target area measured by 1 MOA increases in linear fashion with the distance.

Story sourced by Edlongrange.
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