May 29th, 2018

Innovative Tactical Stock from Grayboe

Grayboe ridgeback DBM tactical fiberglass epoxy stock
The new Grayboe Ridgeback stock is made from a proprietary fiberglass/epoxy compound. MSRP is $599.00 with options for Rem 700/Rem Clone Short Action or Rem 700 Long Action.

Grayboe now offers the Ridgeback stock with both DBM (Detachable Box Magazine) or BDL inlet options. We like the design of this stock. In the rear is a nice adjustable cheekpiece and the toe (underside) has a long straight run which works well in the bags. Length of Pull is adjustable with spacers. The stock is offered for both long and short Rem 700/Rem clone actions, and the DBM version fits AICS magazines. The new Ridgeback Stock is available through the Grayboe network of dealers or direct from the Grayboe website.

Grayboe ridgeback DBM tactical fiberglass epoxy stock

The Grayboe Ridgeback blends qualities of traditional fiberglass stocks with modern features pioneered in chassis systems. The Ridgeback is constructed of proprietary Fiberglass / Epoxy compound formed under high pressure and heat. This creates a precise, low void, homogeneous stock that maintains dimensional stability and strength in all weather and shooting conditions. The Ridgeback features a vertical pistol grip, adjustable cheek piece, and handy M-LOK built into the fore-end. This allows easy customized placement of accessories. Finally the Ridgeback even includes a built-in bubble level — that’s clever and handy.

Grayboe Ridgeback Stock Features:

– Adjustable Cheek-piece
– Adjustable Length of Pull
– Fore-End includes built-in M-LOK
– Built-in Bubble Level
– Homogeneous Fiberglass Epoxy
– Weight 3 pounds, 12 ounces

Grayboe ridgeback DBM tactical fiberglass epoxy stock

Permalink New Product, Tactical No Comments »
May 29th, 2018

Build Your Own 10/22 with $90 Brownells Railed Receiver

Brownells railed 10/22 Ruger receiver picatinny rail barrel semi-auto rimfire .22 LR
A pre-cut hole at the rear of each receiver allows easy insertion of a cleaning rod to clean the bore from the chamber. The Brownells BRN022 receiver will take all accessories/parts made for the Ruger 10/22. You can order factory bolt parts, and a premium barrel.

Now you can build the ultimate 10/22 with an affordable billet railed receiver. Precision-machined from billet 6061 aluminum, the Brownells BRN-22 receiver is fully compatible with components for the Ruger 10/22 platform. Brownells offers both standard factory 10/22 top profile (with drilled-and-tapped scope mounting holes), and a Railed Receiver (shown above) with an integral Picatinny top rail. We think most buyers will get the railed version shown above. At $89.99, it’s only $10 more than the basic version.

Some folks may ask — “Well why not just purchase a production Ruger 10/22 rifle from the factory? It will come complete with barrel, trigger, and stock…” The answer is the components. By starting with a bare bones receiver you can have better-than-factory components from the start — a better barrel, a premium trigger. Plus the Brownells BRN-22R Railed Model comes with a built-in Picatinny rail — that makes it easy to mount optics. And, if you want a specialty stock — say for rimfire tactical games — you can purchase an aftermarket stock that fits your requirements. Finally, the action has a port in the rear so you can insert a cleaning rod to clean from the breech end. This avoids accuracy-compromising cleaning rod damage to the muzzle.

The first part of the video features the all-new Brownells BRN-22R Railed Receiver:

Railed Receiver with Installed Barreled for $159.99
Brownells also sells BRN-22 receivers complete with pre-installed .22 LR barrels. The BRN-22 Barreled Receiver features a 16″ long barrel in either sporter or heavy contours, threaded at the muzzle. Price is $149.99 standard, and $159.99 with Railed Receiver. Then you can add the remaining components — your choice of trigger, stock, sights/optic, and muzzle device.

Brownells railed 10/22 Ruger receiver picatinny rail barrel semi-auto rimfire .22 LR

NOTE: This is NOT a complete barreled action — you will still need bolt, bolt handle, and trigger group — but all those parts can be easily acquired by direct mail-order. Like the bare BRN-22 receiver, this barreled receiver is the “gun” component for ATF purposes, so this must be shipped to your FFL. If you don’t want the rail, get the standard barreled receiver and save $10.00.

BRN-22 Barreled Receiver Features:

  • Receiver machined from 6061 T6 aluminum billet
  • Matte black hardcoat anodized receiver finish
  • 1/2″-28 tpi muzzle threads for brakes and suppressors
  • Matte black oxide finish on barrels
  • Compatible with all components that fit a factory Ruger® 10/22®
  • FFL required for purchase

Barrels are available in Sporter and Heavy profile, both in 16″ length, while the Heavy barrel is also available in a short, 10″ length for pistol or SBR builds. All barrels come with ½”-28 tpi muzzle threads for the installation of a compensator, flash suppressor, or silencer.

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, New Product 2 Comments »
May 29th, 2018

How to Clear-Coat Laminated Wood Stocks

Laminated wood stocks offer an excellent combination of price and performance, and they can be obtained in a myriad of styles to suit your discipline — hunting, benchrest, tactical, silhouette, or high power. Laminated stocks can be a little trickier to finish compared to a hardwood such as walnut, as laminates are often delivered in bright or highly contrasting colors. Traditional wood finishes can alter the colors. Also, filling the pores in laminated stocks is an issue.

Automotive clear-coat products have become popular for finishing laminated wood stocks because they won’t alter the stock’s colors, and the clear-coat provides a durable weather-resistant finish. Clear-coat is also easy to “touch up” and it fills pores better than some other alternatives. Mike Ricklefs has written a comprehensive article on stock painting that includes a special section on clear-coating over laminated woods. If you want to clear-coat a stock, Mike’s article is a must-read!

In that Stock Painting Article, Mike offers these tips:

When finishing laminated stocks with clear-coat, you need to prepare the wood carefully, and build up quite a few thin layers one at a time. Begin by sanding, with progressively finer paper, all the way to 400 grit. Certain laminated stocks are so rough when they come from the stock-maker, that you may have to be very aggressive at first. But be careful with angles and the edges of flats. You don’t want to round these off as you sand.

After sanding, use compressed air to blow out all dust from the pores of the wood. This is very important to avoid a “muddy” looking finish. If you don’t blow the dust out with air before spraying the clear it will migrate out as you apply the clear. Also, after each sanding session, clean your painting area to remove excess dust. I also wet down the floor of my spray booth to keep the dust down.

Some painters recommended using a filler to close the pores. That’s one technique, but the filler can detract from the clarity of the final finish. Rather than use a pore-filling sealer, I use a high solids or “build” clear for the initial applications. This is slightly thicker than “finish” clear and does a good job of sealing the pores. Three (3) fairly heavy coats of “build” clear are applied. If you get a thick spot or a run in the finish at this point, it is not the end of the world but this does create more sanding work.”

There is a helpful thread in our Shooters’ Forum that discusses the use of clear-coating on laminated stocks. Member BHoges offered this advice: “Stick with Diamont, Glassurit, and Spies. If anyone has questions, I painted cars for a long time.”

Forum member Preacher, whose bolt-action pistol is shown in the photo below, states: “I buy my two-part clear-coat from the local NAPA dealer. They recommended Crossfire mixed 4:1. I really like the end results. There are six coats on that stock that were sanded down to bare wood for the first two, and then 600 wet-sanded for the other four coats. Two to three coats would be sufficient if the pores were filled first, but I would rather fill ‘em with the clear as it seems to make it appear deeper and I have the time to devote to it. I have PPG’s Deltron DC 3000 clear-coat on a few stocks of mine, but I like the NAPA better price wise, and it seems to hold up just as good as the Deltron.”

Clear-coat Laminated wood

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 2 Comments »