August 10th, 2018

Get Latest Powder Burn Rate Chart HERE

Hodgdon IMR Winchester Burn Rate Powder speed table relative table chart

Hey guys, you’ll probably want to download this Powder Burn Rate Table issued by Hodgdon/IMR. This table shows the latest IMR powders including the Enduron series (IMR 4166, 4451, 4955, 7977), high-lighted in green below. This 150-entry comparison table provides useful information for all hand-loaders. When doing load development, and testing one powder versus another, it’s generally wise to choose propellants that share the same relative burn rate, as least for starters. This invaluable burn rate chart ranks powders from eight major powder-makers: Accurate, Alliant, Hodgdon, IMR, Norma, Ramshot (Western), Vihtavuori, Winchester.

NOTE: Hodgdon powders are blue, IMR standard powders are yellow, IMR Enduron powders are green, and Winchester Powders are Red. DOWNLOAD Chart HERE.


Latest POWDER BURN RATE TABLE from HODGDON/IMR

Hodgdon IMR Winchester Burn Rate Powder speed table relative table chart

CLICK HERE to Download Chart as PDF File

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Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 7 Comments »
August 10th, 2018

TECH Tip: How to Adjust FL Dies for Correct Shoulder Bump

Sinclair full length sizing die should bump set-back case
CLICK HERE for Sinclair Int’l 3-part video series on using Full-length Sizing Dies.

How Much Shoulder Bump Do You Want?

Some of our readers have questioned how to set up their body dies or full-length sizing dies. Specifically, AFTER sizing, they wonder how much resistance they should feel when closing their bolt.

Forum member Preacher explains:

“A little resistance is a good, when it’s time for a big hammer it’s bad…. Keep your full-length die set up to just bump the shoulder back when they get a little too tight going into the chamber, and you’ll be good to go.”

To quantify what Preacher says, for starters, we suggest setting your body die, or full-length sizing die, to have .0015″ of “bump”. NOTE: This assumes that your die is a good match to your chamber. If your sizing or body die is too big at the base you could push the shoulder back .003″ and still have “sticky case” syndrome. Also, the .0015″ spec is for bolt guns. For AR15s you need to bump the shoulder of your cases .003″ – .005″, for enhanced reliability. For those who have never worked with a body die, bump die, or Full-length sizing die, to increase bump, you loosen lock-ring and screw the die in further (move die down relative to shell-holder). A small amount (just a few degrees) of die rotation can make a difference. To reduce bump you screw the die out (move die up). Re-set lock-ring to match changes in die up/down position.

That .0015″ is a good starting point, but some shooters prefer to refine this by feel. Forum member Chuckhunter notes: “To get a better feel, remove the firing pin from your bolt. This will give you the actual feel of the case without the resistance of the firing pin spring. I always do this when setting up my FL dies by feel. I lock the die in when there is just the very slightest resistance on the bolt and I mean very slight.” Chino69 concurs: “Remove the firing pin to get the proper feel. With no brass in the chamber, the bolt handle should drop down into its recess from the full-open position. Now insert a piece of fire-formed brass with the primer removed. The bolt handle should go to the mid-closed position, requiring an assist to cam home. Do this several times to familiarize yourself with the feel. This is how you want your dies to size your brass, to achieve minimal headspace and a nearly glove-like fit in your chamber.”

We caution that, no matter how well you have developed a “feel” for bolt-closing resistance, once you’ve worked out your die setting, you should always measure the actual amount of shoulder bump to ensure that you are not pushing the shoulder too far back. This is an important safety check. You can measure this using a comparator that attaches to your caliper jaws, or alternatively, use a sized pistol case with the primer removed. See Poor Man’s Headspace Gauge.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 3 Comments »
August 10th, 2018

New FFP Diamondback Vortex Scopes Under $400.00

Vortex Diamondback FFP first focal plane 6-24x50mm 4-16x50mm scope riflescope optic sale glass milrad MOA

Looking for a good, solid First Focal Plane (FFP) optic for hunting or tactical events? Well you’re in luck. Vortex just released a new, ultra-affordable series of Diamondback FFP scopes with 4X zoom ratio. Select from 4-16x50mm or 6-24x50mm models. Both offer plenty of magnification for competitors and long-range varmint hunters. We suggest the 4-16X for hunting and the 6-24X for PRS and other competition disciplines.

These new Diamondbacks feature 30mm maintubes and your choice of either 1/4 MOA clicks or 1/10 Mil clicks. The MOA-click versions feature an EBR-C2 MOA reticle while the Mil-click scopes have an EBR-C2 MRAD reticle. That way the reticle matches your click values (as it always should).

Vortex Diamondback FFP first focal plane 6-24x50mm 4-16x50mm scope riflescope optic sale glass milrad MOA

Currently at EuroOptic.com Vortex’s affordable new 4-16x50mm FFP Diamondback is just $349.99, while the 6-24x50mm version is just $399.99. Either way, these are outstanding values. One of our testers who competes in both long-range and tactical matches was impressed with the new Diamondbacks, given the pricing: “The glass looks fine upon quick inspection. Turrets and everything else feel great for the price paid. I bet there’s no better value out there for a FFP scope with advanced reticle like this”.

MidwayUSA also sells these new Vortex FFP scopes with similar pricing. MidwayUSA’s optics manager raved: “Try not to spit out your coffee as you check the price of the Diamondback Tactical FFP after reading about its impressive performance and features. The first focal plane reticle, a feature ordinarily reserved for 4-figure-priced optics, allows shooters to use the information-packed EBR-2C reticles for ranging, holdovers or windage corrections on any magnification.”

Permalink Hot Deals, New Product, Optics 2 Comments »