September 30th, 2018

6mm Creedmoor Gas Gun — Savage MSR 10 Long Range

savage msr10 AR rifle 6mm 6.5mm Creedmoor Creedmore PRS gas gun ballistics

Savage’s MSR 10 Long Range is now available in 6mm Creedmoor. We think this rifle is a good choice for PRS Gas Gun matches in the Open Division. This AR10-type rig can shoot a larger, more capable cartridge than a .223 Rem (or 224 Valkyrie). And we think the 6mm Creedmoor is definitely a good choice for tactical/practical applications. In fact in the first-ever PRS gas gun match, the winner ran a 6mm Creedmoor. (Story HERE).

The 6mm Creedmoor case design allows room for long, heavy bullets while still functioning in an AR10-size action. The 6mm Creedmoor has become popular with High Power and PRS shooters because it offers excellent accuracy, good ballistics, and moderate recoil. As explained below, the 6mm Creedmoor offers a flatter trajectory, with less recoil, compared to the “parent” 6.5 Creedmoor.

Savage’s semi-automatic MSR 10 Long Range boasts some nice features — such as a Magpul PRS Gen 3 stock, and non-reciprocating, side-charging handle. The MSR 10 Long Range also features a two-stage target trigger, plus upgraded barrel with 5R rifling and Melonite QPQ finish. MSRP is $2284.00.

Savage MSR 10 Long Range Features:
– Non-reciprocating side charging handle
– Fluted 22.5″ heavy barrel with Melonite QPQ finish, 1:7.5″-twist rate
– Custom forged upper/lower for unique look and compact size
– Magpul PRS Gen3 buttstock
– Free-float M-LOK rail
– Two-stage target trigger with nickel boron treatment; 2.5 to 4-pounds
– Chamberings: 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 Winchester

Savage MSR 10 Long Range (6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 Win)

Ballistic Comparison: 6mm Creedmoor vs. 6.5 Creedmoor

Which has better ballistics, the 6mm Creedmoor or the original 6.5 Creedmoor? Well, the answer depends on your bullet choice and the speed of your load. We went to the Hodgdon Reloading Page and selected the MAX listed loads for H4350 for each cartridge, choosing Sierra’s 107gr MatchKing for the 6mm Creedmoor, and Sierra’s 142gr MatchKing for the 6.5 Creedmoor. Hodgdon’s max H4350 load for the 6mm Creedmoor with 107gr bullet yields 3009 fps at 60,300 psi (24″ barrel). The max H4350 load for the 6.5 Creedmoor with 142gr bullet runs 2694 fps at 59,800 psi (24″ barrel).

With these listed Hodgdon Max loads, the 6mm Creedmoor had a flatter trajectory and less wind drift. Here is a quick comparison, based on data from JBM Ballistics.

6mm Creedmoor with 107gr SMK
Hodgdon H4350 Max “Book” Load, 3009 fps

savage msr10 AR rifle 6mm 6.5mm Creedmoor Creedmore PRS gas gun ballistics

600-Yard Drop = -11.5 MOA | 600-Yard Windage (10mph 90°) = 24.4 inches

6.5 Creedmoor with 142gr SMK
Hodgdon H4350 Max “Book” Load, 2694 fps

savage msr10 AR rifle 6mm 6.5mm Creedmoor Creedmore PRS gas gun ballistics

600-Yard Drop = -14.4 MOA | 600-Yard Windage (10mph 90°) = 25.8 inches

Commentary — Ballistics Comparisons and “Beyond Book” Loads
We are aware that some shooters are running faster loads in both 6mm Creedmoor and 6.5 Creedmoor rifles. The ballistics comparison would also change with different bullet choices for one or both calibers. However, by using Hodgdon’s listed max loads with the SAME Powder this is a meaningful starting comparison for the two related chamberings. Bottom line, the 6mm Creedmoor shoots flatter and has less wind drift. It also definitely has less recoil. This 6mm Creedmoor load has 2150.8 ft/lbs of energy at the muzzle. The listed 6.5 Creedmoor load has 2288.0 ft/lbs of energy at the muzzle.

Of course we know some guys are running their 6.5 Creedmoor faster with 140gr-class bullets. That would alter the comparison. But if you ask most actual PRS competitors who have campaigned BOTH the 6mm Creedmoor and the 6.5 Creedmoor, they will tell you the 6mm Creedmoor has less recoil, and a somewhat flatter trajectory. That makes this new 6mm Creedmoor Savage MSR 10 rifle an interesting alternative to its 6.5 Creedmoor brother.

PRS Gas Gun Series 6mm Creedmoor AR10

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Tactical No Comments »
September 30th, 2018

Get FREE Official AccurateShooter.com Precision Targets

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target
Right-Click target image to download printable PDF.

We created the above target a decade ago. Since then it has been used by tens of thousands of shooters. It has proven very popular as a load development target, since all your load data fits neatly in the boxes under each target. In fact this target is being employed by both rifle-makers and barrel-makers (including Criterion) to test their products. The target was designed for aiming efficiency. The diamonds have 1/2″ sides and you can align your cross-hairs on the horizontal and vertical lines. It is a clean design that is easy to see even at 200 yards with a 20X scope. When we test, we usually crank in a little elevation, setting the point-of-impact higher, so that our shots fall in the gray circles. That way you leave the squares intact for precise aiming.

We also use these two targets for load development and precision practice. The circle dot target can also be used for informal rimfire competition at 50 yards.
Right-Click Each Target to Download Printable PDFs.

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target


GET 50 More FREE Targets on AccurateShooter Target Page »

Printing Targets card stock heavy paper benchrestHow to Print Your Targets
Most of us have access to a printer at home or at work. That means you can print your own targets. You’ll find hundreds of free target designs online, including dozens of downloadable targets on our AccurateShooter.com Target Page. If you’re feeling creative, you can design your own target with a computer drawing program such as MS Paint.

Paper Stock Is Important
If you want your self-printed targets to show shots cleanly (and not rip when it gets windy), you should use quality paper stock. We recommend card stock — the kind of thick paper used for business cards. Card stock is available in both 65-lb and 110-lb weights in a variety of colors. We generally print black on white. But you might experiment with bright orange or yellow sheets. Forum Member ShootDots report: “They sell cardstock at Fed-Ex Kinko! I use either Orange or Yellow. That makes it easy to see the bullet holes clearly.” On some printers, with the heavier 110-lb card stock, you will need to have the paper exit through the rear for a straighter run.

Printing Targets card stock heavy paper benchrest

Here are some Target-Printing Tips from our Forum members:

“Staples sells a 67-lb heavy stock that I have settled on. I use the light grey or light blue, either of these are easy on the eyes on bright days. I have used the 110-lb card stock as well and it works fine. It’s just a little easier to print the lighter stuff.” (JBarnwell)

“Cardstock, as mentioned, works great for showing bullet holes as it doesn’t tear or rip like the thin, lightweight 20-lb paper. I’ve never had a problem with cardstock feeding in the printer, just don’t stick too many sheets in there. If I need three targets, I load only three card stock sheets”. (MEMilanuk)

“20-lb bond works pretty well for me if I use a spray adhesive and stick the entire back of the paper’s surface to the backer board.” (Lapua40X)

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, Shooting Skills 1 Comment »