October 2nd, 2018

Hand Clamp Bullet Puller — Grip-N-Pull Pros and Cons

Grip-N-Pull bullet cartridge puller removal neck inertial pull collet case reloading

Do you need to pull bullets that have been seated in a case? You can use lever-actuated, collet-type pullers, or inertial hammer-style pullers, but there is a faster solution. The Grip-N-Pull bullet puller is a precision-machined hand clamp that works for multiple calibers. A single Grip-N-Pull can replace several other tools, while being faster to use. With larger-diameter bullets loaded with light-to-moderate neck tension, it works well. The bullets come out pretty easily, with no scuff marks or dents. For smaller-diameter, .204 to .243 caliber bullets, it may be hard to grip the bullet easily, or you may end up with some jacket damage. And we wouldn’t use this for factory-crimped cartridges.

Introduction to Grip-N-Pull — How It Works:

How to Use the Grip-N-Pull
Put your loaded case in the shell-holder on a reloading press. Raise the ram so the bullet is exposed at the top of the press. Then select the correct, caliber-specific slot in the Grip-N–Pull, clasp the bullet firmly, then lower the ram. The bullet withdraws from the case-neck, retained in the tool. Fast and simple. If there isn’t much neck tension (or a crimp), the bullet should come out undamaged.

Not So Great for Small-Diameter Bullets
Watch this video — the tester says the Grip-N-Pull works well with larger-diameter bullets, but there can be slippage with smaller-diameter projectiles, or those with short bearing surfaces. NOTE: When there is a lot of neck tension, you have to grip extremely hard which can cause your hand to hurt after a while. And the bullets can get marred.


This video explains some of the shortcomings of the Grip-N-Pull.

Four Grip-N-Pull Models Available
Grip-N-Pull bullet pullers can be used for multiple calibers. For example, the Standard Rifle Grip-N-Pull pulls bullets for these calibers: .17, .20, .22, .24, .25, .26, .27, .28, and .30. The Large Rifle model works with 8mm, .338, .375, .416 and .458. There is a third model for pistol cartridges, and a fourth “Mil-Spec” unit that does 5.56, 7.62, .338 and .50 BMG. Grip-N-Pull bullet pullers are made of 1/4″ heavy-duty #30 stainless steel and are backed by a lifetime warranty.

Speed and Efficiency of Grip-N-Pull
The Grip-N-Pull’s creators claim this hand clamp cuts bullet pulling time in half. For a speed comparison between Grip-N-Pull and a hammer-style (inertial) bullet puller, watch this Extreme Outer Limits video. Bob and Chris Beck do a head-to-head comparison between the Grip-N-Pull and an inertia puller. It’s no contest — the Grip-N-Pull is way faster, and the powder stays in the case.

Pull Comparison — Grip-N-Pull Vs. Hammer-Style Inertial Puller

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Reloading 3 Comments »
October 2nd, 2018

The Three Amigos — Los Tacticales!

Tactical Rifle Amigos Manners Stocks Bartlein Nightforce

Tactical Rifle Amigos Manners Stocks Bartlein NightforceJerod’s Tactical Trio
Many guys are lucky to have just one accurate tactical rifle fitted with a custom barrel and high-end optics. Well forum member Jerod (aka Stinnett1981) has three!

Jerod calls his tactical trio the “Three Amigos”. All are built with Manners Composite stocks and Bartlein barrels. But there are three different chamberings. In order below (from top to bottom) are: .308 Win (Bartlein 5R, 1:10″ twist); .223 Rem (Bartlein 5R, 1:8″ twist);,and 6.5×47 Lapua (Bartlein 5R 1:8.5″ twist). Read on for a full description of each build.

Tactical Rifle Amigos Manners Stocks Bartlein Nightforce

The tan rifle is Jerod’s .308 Winchester. It has a Manners T4A stock, trued Rem 700 SA, Badger M5 DBM, and Bartlein 5R 10-twist HV contour finished at 23″. The optic is a Bushnell XRS 4.5-30X50mm FFP with G2 reticle scope.

Tactical Rifle Amigos Manners Stocks Bartlein Nightforce

The Green rifle is a .223 Remington. This has a Manners T4 stock, trued Rem 700 SA, Badger M5 DBM, and Bartlein 5R 8-twist HV contour finished at 23″. On top is a Nightforce NXS F1 3.5-15X50mm FFP with MLR 2.0 reticle scope. Jerod says: “This scope and reticle are awesome.”

Tactical Rifle Amigos Manners Stocks Bartlein Nightforce

The Black rifle is chambered for the 6.5-47 Lapua. Components are: Manners T4A stock, Stiller TAC 30, Badger M5 DBM, Bartlein 5R 8.5-twist bull barrel (1″ at muzzle) finished at 26″. The scope is a Nightforce NXS 8-32X56mm with NP2DD reticle.

What Comes Next — A Rimfire Maybe?
While Jarod’s Three Amigos make up a very impressive tactical troika, we’d like to see one more rifle added to the mix — a .22 LR rimfire rig, set up with a similar stock. That would be perfect for low-cost cross-training, or competition in Rimfire Tactical matches. Jerod could build the “fourth Amigo” using a rimfire action. Here is just such a rifle, built by Brian of GA Precision with a modified Rem 40X action in a Manners T4A stock (matching Jerod’s centerfire stocks). Pretty cool eh?

Could This Be the Fourth Amigo? 40X Rimfire in Manners Stock

Rem 40X Manners stock rimfire cross-trainer
Brian, a gunsmith at GA Precision, built this rimfire rig with GAP colleague Anthony Soukup.

Permalink Gear Review, Tactical 3 Comments »
October 2nd, 2018

Bump Control: Precision Shims for Full-Length Sizing Dies

Sinclair Die Shims

When your cases become hard to extract, or you feel a stiff bolt lift when removing a cartridge, it’s probably time to full-length size your cases, and “bump” the shoulder back. With a hunting load, shoulder bumping may only be required every 4-5 loading cycles. Short-range benchrest shooters, running higher pressures, typically full-length size every load cycle, bumping the shoulder .001-.002″. High Power shooters with gas guns generally full-length size every time, and may need to bump the shoulders .003″ or more to ensure reliable feeding and extraction.

Use Shims for Precise Control of Shoulder Bump
Some shooters like to set the “default” position for their full-length die to have an “ample” .003″ or .004″ shoulder bump. When they need less bump, a simple way to reduce the amount of shoulder movement is to use precision shims in .001″ (one-thousandth) increments.

Here are reports from Forum members who use the shims:

“Great product. I have my die lock ring(s) adjusted for the shortest headspace length on my multiple chambers 6BRs and 6PPCs. When needing a longer headspace, I just refer to my notes and add the appropriate shim under the lock ring. Keep it simple.” — F.D. Shuster

Mats Johansson writes: “I’ve been using [shims] since Skip Otto (of BR fame) came out with them. I set up my dies with the .006″ shim, giving me the option of bumping the shoulder a bit more when the brass gets old and hardens while still having room to adjust up for zero headspace, should I have missed the original setup by a thou or two. Hunting rounds can easily be bumped an extra .002-.003″ for positive, no-crush feeding. Being a safety-oriented cheapskate, I couldn’t live without them — they let me reload my cases a gazillion times without dangerous web-stretching. Shims are a must-have, as simple as that.” — Mats Johansson

Sinclair Die ShimsSinclair Int’l offers a seven-piece set of Sizing Die Shims that let you adjust the height of your die (and thereby the amount of bump and sizing) in precise .001″ increments. Sinclair explains: “Some handloaders will set their die up to achieve maximum sizing and then progressively use Sinclair Die Shims between the lock ring and the press head to move the die away from the shellholder. Doing this allows you to leave the lock ring in the same position. These shims are usually available in increments of .001″ and work very well.”

Seven Shims from .003″ to .010″
Sinclair’s Die Shim Kit (item 22400) includes seven shims in thicknesses of .003, .004, .005, .006, .007, .008, and .010. For ease of use, shim thickness is indicated by the number of notches cut in the outer edge of each shim. Even without looking you can “count” the notches by feel. Normally priced at $11.99, this shim kit is on sale now for $10.99.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 1 Comment »