November 15th, 2018

Love at First Shot Season 5 — Top Ladies ‘Shoot Like a Girl’

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

Many of the nation’s top female shooters are featured in the NRA video series, “Love at First Shot”. Now entering its fifth season, the series introduces a new competition this season — the Pro-Am Challenge. This new event matches top female pros with amateur ladies in action shooting competitions, testing both their shooting skills and their teamwork in 2 on 2 pair competition.

Season Five premieres Friday November 16 on the NRA Women Facebook Page at 8:00 PM Eastern Time. There will be six episodes total, running six weeks through December 21, 2018. After each episode airs on Facebook, you can watch the show on NRAwomen.TV.

Watch Love at First Shot Season 5 Trailer (Plenty of Action):

Get a sneak peek at the season premiere of Love at First Shot featuring host Natalie Foster and Julie Golob of Team Smith & Wesson Corp.

Eight women. Four teams. Love at First Shot Season 5 pairs pro shooters with amateur shooters in a Pro-Am Challenge that provides for great competition and comraderie. Hosts Natalie Foster and Julie Golob lead the lady shooters through five challenging stages. Each course of fire was created by world-champion shooter Golob to test skill, accuracy, speed and teamwork.

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

The talented Season 5 cast members have a wide variety of backgrounds:

Breann Bates
Conservative student activist

Kaitlin Clark
Social media strategist

Cheyenne Dalton
Rimfire and 3-Gun competitor

Annette Evans
USPSA, 3-Gun and IDPA competitor

Alisha James
Former law enforcement officer

Janna Reeves
3-Gun competitor

Emily Valentine
Creator of Style Me Tactical

Becky Yackley
3-Gun competitor

Love first shot NRA Women TV facebook Julie Golob

The Season Premiere of Love at First Shot is Friday, November 16, and the episode will air live on the NRA Women Facebook page at 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT. New episodes will debut on Facebook live every Friday at the same time for six straight weeks, concluding on Friday, December 21. After each episode airs live on NRA Women Facebook, it will then become available for viewing on NRAWomen.TV, NRATV.com, and Apple TV and Roku via the NRATV app.

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November 15th, 2018

Sectional Density of Bullets — What You Need to Know

Bullet projectile sectional density formula Sierra Bullets

by Sierra Bullets Ballistic Technician Paul Box
All of us who have been in reloading and shooting for any period of time have read how sectional density has been regarded as a bullet’s ability to penetrate. Back before high velocity came along and modern bullet design, the easiest way to get more “power” and penetration was by increasing the diameter and mass. After all, a bowling ball will hurt more than a golf ball, right?

Let’s take a closer look at sectional density.

The formula for calculating sectional density is pretty simple and straight forward. Take the bullet weight and divide by 7000. This number is then divided by the bullet diameter squared. Two bullets of equal weight and the same diameter will have equal sectional sectional density. No regard is given to the bullet construction. This is where the fly hits the soup in considering sectional density as far as penetration is concerned.

Section Density Formula: (Bullet Weight divided by 7000) divided by Bullet Diameter squared.

Bullet construction is the biggest factor in how it is able to penetrate. The best example I can think of here is to look at the Sierra .224 55 Gr. FMJBT GameKing #1355 compared to the 55 Gr. BlitzKing #1455. Both are .224 and weigh 55 grs. Both have a sectional density of .157. But there is a huge difference in their construction. The FMJ has a thick jacket and is designed to penetrate. The BlitzKing is designed for fast and rapid expansion with little concern for how deep they will penetrate.

The next time you’re choosing a bullet, look at the construction and less at the sectional density number. It’s all about the construction anyway. If you have any questions or would like to discuss sectional density or bullet penetration further, please give us a call at 800-223-8799 or shoot us an email at sierra@sierrabullets.com.

Sierra Bullets reloading tips

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November 15th, 2018

Tool Time: Sinclair Cartridge Case Neck Sorting Tool

Case Neck thickness sorting gauge Sinclair accurateshooter.com

He who dies with the most toys wins — right? Well Sinclair has another interesting gadget you can add to your reloading bench. The Sinclair Case Neck Sorting Tool lets you quickly sort brass by neck-wall thickness. For those who shoot “no-turn” brass, this can improve neck-tension consistency. Large variances in neck-wall thickness can cause inconsistent neck “grip” on the bullet. Generally, we’ve found that more consistent neck tension will lower ES and (usually) improve accuracy. We know some guys who shoot no-turn 6mmBR brass in competition with considerable success — but their secret is pre-sorting their brass by neck-wall thickness. Cases that are out-of-spec are set aside for sighters (or are later skim-turned).

Watch Case Neck Sorting Tool Operation in Video

Case Neck thickness sorting gauge Sinclair accurateshooterHow the Case Neck Sorting Tool Works
Here’s how the Sinclair tool works. Cases are rotated under an indicator tip while they are supported on a case-neck pilot and a support pin through the flash hole. The unit has a nice, wide base and low profile so it is stable in use. The tool works for .22 through .45 caliber cases and can be used on .17- and .20-caliber cases with the optional carbide alignment rod. The MIC-4 pin fits both .060 (PPC size) and .080 (standard size) flash holes. Sinclair’s Case Neck Sorting Tool can be ordered with or without a dial indicator. The basic unit without dial indicator (item 749-006-612WB) is $59.99. The tool complete with dial indicator (item 749-007-129WB) for $89.99. IMPORTANT: This tool requires caliber-specific Sinclair Case Neck Pilots which must be ordered separately.

Editor’s Comment: The purpose of this Sinclair tool is rapid, high-quantity sorting of cartridge brass to ascertain significant case-neck-wall thickness variations. Consider this a rapid culling/sorting tool. If you are turning your necks, you will still need a quality ball micrometer tool to measure neck-wall thickness (to .0005) before and after neck-turning operations.

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