December 4th, 2018

Ruger Precision Rifle in .338 Lapua Magnum Field Tested

Ruger Precision Rifle .338 Lapua .300 Winchester Magnum

The Ruger Precision Rifle goes big — major Magnum-size big. Back in October we revealed that Ruger was releasing new .338 Lapua Magnum and .300 WinMag versions of the Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR). These Magnum RPRs feature longer, stronger actions, and some key upgrades, such as a +30 MOA rail and beefy muzzle brakes on the end of the 26″ 5R Barrels. These are pretty impressive rigs for the money — $2099 MSRP, with the “street price” well under $1700.00.

READ .338 Lapua Magnum RPR GunsAmerica Test »

So how do these Big Rigs shoot? GunsAmerica.com recently answered that question, testing a .338 Lapua Magnum RPR with a variety of factory ammo types. GunsAmerica’s tester Clay Martin, a skilled former military sniper (retired from 3rd Special Forces group), shot the rifle from prone off bipod. With Hornady 285gr Match Ammo, Martin drilled two 3-round groups that both measured right around a half-inch. With some other ammo, results were ugly, but the 285-grainers showed that the gun could shoot. (Five-shot 100-yard groups with Federal 300gr ammo were around 1.3 MOA — see photo below).

Ruger Precision Rifle .338 Lapua .300 Winchester Magnum

Overall Martin came away impressed: “My respect for the RPR in .338 Lapua Magnum is high. If it will shoot ½ MOA at 100, there is no reason to think it won’t at any range a match bullet will fly [provided you call the wind right]. Despite the uber-manly caliber, the gun was fun to shoot. The muzzle brake and weight do a great job of taming recoil[.] For a .338 Lapua-caliber rifle, I can’t think of a single better option below $5,000. If you have been waiting to step into the big boy rounds, this is a golden opportunity.”

Watch Field Test of .338 Lapua Magnum Ruger Precision Rifle:

RPR Magnums Boast 5R Barrels with Big Brakes
The new RPR magnums feature hammer-forged, chrome-moly heavy-contour 5R barrels fitted with tunable muzzle brakes. Those fat, large-port brakes will certainly reduce recoil and muzzle jump but we wouldn’t like to be shooting beside the .338 LM RPR — expect lots of side-blast. The new RPR magnums feature 18″ free-float anodized handguards with M-LOK accessory attachment slots on all four sides. Integral QD sling attachment points eliminate the need for additional adaptors and a flat-bottom 1.50″ dovetail is compatible with RRS S.O.A.R. and similar QD systems.

ruger precision rifle rpr .300 Winchester magnum lapua mag .338 rifle long range

The .338 Lapua Magnum RPR features a 1:9.375″ twist rate while the .300 Winchester Magnum model features a 1:9″ twist rate, both of which stabilize long-for-caliber projectiles. These rifles ship with two, 5-round AI-style magazines. As with all RPRs, the bolt is a 3-lug design with 70-degree bolt lift.

Angled +30 MOA Rail and Adjustable Stock Standard
ELR shooters will be pleased that the new, magnum-caliber RPRs ship with a +30 MOA Picatinny rail. That will help give shooters enough elevation to shoot out to 1500 yards and beyond. As with other Ruger Precision Rifle models, the magnums feature a folding stock with adjustable comb height and length of pull. The Ruger Marksman trigger is user-adjustable between 2.25 and 5 pounds.

ruger precision rifle rpr .300 Winchester magnum lapua mag .338 rifle long range

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December 4th, 2018

Holiday Air Travel with Firearms — Know the TSA Regulations

Tom McHale flying with firearms guns TSA

If you will be flying with firearms this holiday season, you should read this article. You need to familiarize yourself with current Federal Regulations on gun transport before you get anywhere near an airport. Thankfully, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has a web page that states the important requirements for airline passengers traveling with firearms and/or ammunition.

TSA Tips on Traveling with Firearms:

You’ll want to visit the TSA Firearms and Ammunition webpage, and read it start to finish. In addition, before your trip, you should check the regulations of the airline(s) with which you will fly. Some airlines have special requirements, such as weight restrictions.

Here Are the TSA’s Key Guidelines for Travel with Firearms:

1. All firearms* must be declared to the airline during the ticket counter check-in process.
The term firearm includes:

    – Any weapon (including a starter gun) which will, or is designed to, or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive.
    – The frame or receiver of any such weapon.
    – Any firearm muffler or firearm silencer.
    – Any destructive device.

2. The firearm must be unloaded. As defined by 49 CFR 1540.5 – “A loaded firearm means a firearm that has a live round of ammunition, or any component thereof, in the chamber or cylinder or in a magazine inserted in the firearm.”

3. The firearm must be in a hard-sided container that is locked. A locked container is defined as one that completely secures the firearm from being accessed. Locked cases that can be pulled open with little effort cannot be brought aboard the aircraft.

4. If firearms are not properly declared or packaged, TSA will provide the checked bag to law enforcement for resolution with the airline. If the issue is resolved, law enforcement will release the bag to TSA so screening may be completed.

5. TSA must resolve all alarms in checked baggage. If a locked container containing a firearm alarms, TSA will contact the airline, who will make a reasonable attempt to contact the owner and advise the passenger to go to the screening location. If contact is not made, the container will not be placed on the aircraft.

6. If a locked container alarms during screening and is not marked as containing a declared firearm, TSA will cut the lock in order to resolve the alarm.

7. Travelers should remain in the area designated by the aircraft operator or TSA representative to take the key back after the container is cleared for transportation.

8. Travelers must securely pack any ammunition in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition.

9. Firearm magazines and ammunition clips, whether loaded or empty, must be securely boxed or included within a hard-sided case containing an unloaded firearm.

10. Small arms ammunition, including ammunition not exceeding .75 caliber for a rifle or pistol and shotgun shells of any gauge, may be carried in the same hard-sided case as the firearm, as long as it follows the packing guidelines described above.

11. TSA prohibits black powder or percussion caps used with black-powder.

12. Rifle scopes are not prohibited in carry-on bags and do not need to be in the hard-sided, locked checked bag.

More Airline Travel Tips from Tom McHale
Tom McHale has written an excellent article for the Beretta Blog, Ten Things You Need to Know about Flying with Guns. We suggest you visit the Beretta Blog to read this informative story. Here are two of Tom McHale’s Travel Tips:

Weigh your gun case and ammunition
Most airlines will allow up to 11 pounds of ammunition. And, like any luggage, you will be charged more for any baggage weighing more than 50 pounds. This sounds like a lot, but when traveling to the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun competition last year, my case with shotgun, rifle, pistol and ammunition tipped the scale past the 50 pound mark.

Pack ammo in the same locking case
This is another area that’s misunderstood and full of internet myth. Your ammo just needs to be stored in some type of safe container and not loose. Technically, you can keep ammunition in magazines, but I wouldn’t recommend it. It meets the letter of the law storage requirement, but too many airline and TSA agents will give you grief. Use a plastic ammo box or original cardboard packaging and you’ll be fine carrying that in the same lockable case as your gun.

Tom McHale flying with firearms guns TSA

*Please see, United States Code, Title 18, Part 1, Chapter 44 for information about firearm definitions.

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