December 9th, 2018

Video Showcase — Field Tests of the Ruger Precision Rimfire

Ruger Rimfire Precision .22 LR smallbore chassis rifle adjustable bolt tactical PRS

The relatively new Ruger Precision Rimfire has generated considerable interest because it is an affordable, chassis-style platform well-suited for tactical/practical cross training. It also offers some cool features including a +30 MOA scope rail and adjustable bolt throw length (from 1.5″ to ~3.0″). The adjustable bolt lets you switch to a longer, centerfire-style bolt “run” for consistent cross-training. That’s clever.

Introduced at the beginning of 2018, the Ruger Precision Rimfire has now been in the hands of multiple reviewers who have tested the little rifle for accuracy, reliability, and functionality. This smallbore chassis rifle has been tested with a variety of ammo and in both bench and “tactical” style sessions. Here are three videos that put the Ruger Precision Rifle though its paces.

VIDEO ONE — Impressive Accuracy Suppressed from Bipod at 130m

In this video, a UK-based shooter tests the Ruger Precision Rimfire with a suppressor. He came away mighty impressed with the rig’s accuracy, stating: “It is a flippin’ laser. Oh my god I’m impressed with that — five minutes in and it’s grouping literally like that [makes small “OK” sign with thumb and index] on the steel at 130m”. (Time-mark 2:40+)

VIDEO TWO — 22 Plinkster Explains Gun Features

In this video, popular YouTube gun tester 22 Plinkster explains the Ruger Precision Rimfire’s features in detail. Then he puts an early production example through its paces. He gets good accuracy from a bench, but also tries some off-hand shooting, demonstrating the rifle’s suitability for tactical cross-training.

Ruger Rimfire Precision .22 LR smallbore chassis rifle adjustable bolt tactical PRS

With Federal Gold Medal Ultra-Match, 22 Plinkster produced a 5-shot group well under half-inch (with first three overlapped and the last two in same hole) at 50 yards. Note 22 Plinkster’s bench set-up. He uses a second rabbit-eared sandbag in the FRONT. This “field expedient” solution is clever. The front bag’s ears mate well with the rifle’s tubular fore-arm, adding considerable stability. And the front sand-bag helpd absorb vibration, always a good thing. For a varminter who doesn’t want to carry a bulky front rest, this is worth trying. The bag in front functions like a compact version of the large, heavy Bulls Bag.

VIDEO Three — Five Ammo Types and Front Rest

Here is detailed review from Down-Under that was positive. From bench, with Caldwell front rest, five different ammo types were tested: SK Rifle Match, SK Standard Plus, Eley Match, Eley Edge, and CCI High Velocity. The tester reports: “I was able to get 0.9″ 10-shot groups at 50 yards and 1.5″ 10-shot groups at 100 yards using Eley Edge. Overall the rifle is good but I don’t honestly think I achieved any greater accuracy over my standard Ruger American Rimfire Rifle.” We think that’s a fair assessment. This is an accurate rifle, but other affordable bolt actions can probably rival the accuracy, so the buying decision should be based on the rifle’s other features — such as the chassis.

Ruger Precision Rimfire .22 LR

For Ruger Precision Rifle owners, this .22 LR offers ergonomics just like their centerfire rig. This PRS-style .22 LR rig has some very interesting features, including adjustable bolt throw that lets shooters change from a rimfire 1.5″ bolt throw to a short-action centerfire 3″ bolt throw, reducing the chance of short-stroking your bolt in competition. The Ruger Marksman trigger adjusts from 2.25 to 5.0 pounds.

Ruger Precision Rimfire .22 LR

RUGER PRECISION RIMFIRE Important Features:
Quick-Fit Stock with adjustable cheekpiece and adjustable LOP
18″ barrel, pre-threaded for brakes and Silent-SR® suppressor
Barrel can be removed and replaced easily with AR-style tools
Picatinny scope rail with +30 MOA built-in elevation
Front 15″ free-float M-Lok handguard
Adjustable Trigger 2.25 to 5 pounds
Accepts all Ruger 10/22 magazines

Ruger Precision Rimfire .22 LR

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December 9th, 2018

For Gun Guys: Big Wall Posters with True-to-Scale Ammo

ammo poster ammunition cartridge comparison guide

Need something for the walls of your “man cave” or reloading room? Looking for a great Xmas gift for one of your shooting buddies? The creators of the Cartridge Comparison Guide offer a collection of wall posters showing ammunition types from 17 caliber rimfire cartridges all the way up to giant 35mm military rounds. ChamberIt.com offers 15 different large wall posters that display a huge variety of cartridge types.

For example, the Rifleman’s Classic Poster (below), a full 38 inches wide and 27 inches tall, is the most comprehensive. This $17.99 poster displays over 300 rifle cartridge types at true size (within 4/1000 of an inch). Cartridges shown range from .17 caliber all the way up to the big boomers (including some cannon shells). The Rifleman’s Classic Poster includes nearly all American Standardized Rifle Cartridges and many European rifle cartridges.

Rifleman’s Classic Poster
Big Bore Cartridge Comparison Guide Poster
Click to view large size poster.

Ammunition Performance Specifications Poster
There is also an interesting Ammo Performance Specs poster. This shows dozens of popular hunting cartridges with the velocity, energy, momentum and recoil for each cartridge displayed in a bar graph.

Ammo Ammunition Comparison Guide Poster

This shows the actual size of the Ammo Performance Poster as displayed on a wall.
Ammo Ammunition Comparison Guide Poster

(more…)

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December 9th, 2018

Guide to Gun Metals — What You Need to Know

Sweeney Guide to Gun Metal

4140, 4150, 316, 17-4, 6061, 7075-T6 — What is the significance of these numbers? No, they’re not winning lottery numbers. These are all designations for metals commonly used in firearm and barrel construction. 4140 and 4150 are carbon steels, with 4150 often used in mil-spec AR15 barrels. 316 and 17-4 are grades of stainless steel. 316 is “marine grade” stainless, while 17-4 has 17% chromium and 4% nickel. 17-4 is a harder steel used in barrels and receivers. 6061 and 7075-T6 are aluminum alloys. 6061 is “aircraft grade” aluminum, often used for rings and trigger guards, while 7075-T6 is a much stronger, heat-treated aluminum commonly used in AR15 uppers.

Sweeney Guide to Gun MetalYou can learn about all these metals (and more) in the online archives of RifleShooter magazine.

Written by Patrick Sweeney, RifleShooter’s Guide to Gun Metal summarizes the primary types of steel and aluminum used in gun and barrel construction. Sweeney explains the nomenclature used to define metal types, and he outlines the salient properties of various steel and aluminum alloys. This is a useful resource for anyone selecting components or building rifles. We recommend you print out the page, or at least bookmark it.

Metals by the Number
The number system for steel classification came from the auto industry. Sweeney explains: “The Society of Automotive Engineers uses a simple designating system, the four numbers you see bandied about in gun articles. Numbers such as 1060, 4140 or 5150 all designate how much of what [elements are] in them. The first number is what class—carbon, nickel, chromium, and so forth. The next three numbers [list other elements in the alloy]. 4140, also known as ordnance steel, was one of the early high-alloy steels. It has about 1 percent chromium, 0.25 percent molybdenum, 0.4 percent carbon, 1 percent manganese, around 0.2 percent silicon and no more than 0.035 percent phosphorus and no more than 0.04 percent sulphur. That leaves most of it, 94.25 percent, iron.”

Aluminum Alloys
Numbers are also used to differentiate different types of aluminum alloys. Sweeny writes: “Aluminum is used in firearms in two alloys: 7075 and 6061. 6061 is commonly referred to as ‘aircraft aluminum’ and has trace amounts of silicon, copper, manganese, molybdenum and zinc. 7075 is a much stronger alloy and has markedly larger amounts of copper, manganese, chromium and zinc.” 7075 Aluminum has significantly better corrosion resistance, and that’s why it is used for AR receivers. The “T6″ you often see appended to 7075 refers to a heat-treating process.

Aluminum (or “Aluminium” in the UK) is a chemical element in the boron group with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, nonmagnetic, ductile metal. Aluminum is the third most abundant element, and the most abundant metal, in the Earth’s crust. (Wikipedia)

Aluminum alloy table chart Silicon Maganese Zinc Copper Magnesium

To learn more about the metals used in your firearms’ barrels, rings, receivers, and internal parts, read Sweeney’s article in RifleShooterMag.com. Taking the time to read the article from start to finish will expand your knowledge of metal properties and how metals are chosen by manufacturers and gunsmiths. CLICK to Read Guide to Gun Metal.

Story Tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions. Aluminum Alloy chart courtesy AluminiumDesign.net.
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