January 8th, 2019

NEW Products + SHOT Show Coverage in Shooting Industry Mag

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

You’ll find lots of notable new products in Shooting Industry’s January 2019 issue. This 108-page issue is filled with timely articles ranging from marketing insights and SHOT Show 2019 coverage to tips for success in the new year. The January issue also includes Part II of the 2019 New Product Showcase. January’s 30-page New Product Showcase features over 150 products from 115 brands. Here are some highlights from the Product Showcase:

Steyr’s Monobloc — Barrel and Action are one piece of steel. Impressive engineering, but what happens when your barrel wears out?

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

Berger has new 6mm Creedmoor Ammo plus new .375-Caliber bullets for ELR shooters:

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

Lyman has a great new Case Trimmer with speed control and carbide cutter:

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

New Brass from Jagemann and BOG “DeathGrip” Clamping Tactical Tripod:

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

New Generation Mantis — Accelerometer and software tracks your muzzle movement:

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

Have a LONG F-Class Rifle or a PRS rig with suppressor? This nice case will hold your rig:

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

MORE SHOT Show Coverage

Shooting Industry’s January Issue has extensive SHOT Show coverage, including the comprehensive Exhibitors Guide, SHOT Show Auction info, plus a sizable pullout map in the printed editions.

SHOT Show Exhibitor List Map 2019 Guide New Product

READ MORE — All recent issues of Shooting Industry magazine can be accessed for free at www.shootingindustry.com/digital-version. Have a comment after reading the issue? Send the SI team an email at comments [at] shootingindustry.com.

Feature story tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.

Permalink News 3 Comments »
January 8th, 2019

Reloading Rescue — How to Remove a Case Stuck in a Die

stuck72

Western powders, ramshot, norma, accurate

To err is human… Sooner or later you’ll probably get a case stuck in a die. This “fix-it” article, which originally appeared in the Western Powders Blog, explains the procedure for removing a firmly stuck cartridge case using an RCBS kit. This isn’t rocket science, but you do want to follow the directions carefully, step-by-step. Visit the Western Powders Blog for other helpful Tech Tips.

Curing the Stuck Case Blues

decapstem72Sticking a case in the sizer die is a rite of passage for the beginning handloader. If you haven’t done it yet, that’s great, but it probably will eventually happen. When it does, fixing the problem requires a bit of ingenuity or a nice little kit like the one we got from RCBS.

The first step is to clear the de-capping pin from the flash hole. Just unscrew the de-capping assembly to move it as far as possible from the primer pocket and flash hole (photo at right). Don’t try to pull it all the way out. It won’t come. Just unscrew it and open as much space as possible inside the case.

Place the die upside down in the padded jaws of a vise and clamp it firmly into place. Using the supplied #7 bit, drill through the primer pocket. Be careful not to go too deeply inside the cartridge once the hole has opened up. It is important to be aware that the de-capping pin and expander ball are still in there and can be damaged by the bit.

Drill and Tap the Stuck Case
taping72drilling72

Once the cartridge head has been drilled, a ¼ – 20 is tap is used to cut threads into the pocket. Brass is relatively soft compared to a hardened tap, so no lube is needed for the tapping process. RCBS says that a drill can be used for this step, but it seems like a bit of overkill in a project of this nature. A wrench (photo above right) makes short work of the project.

RCBS supplies a part they call the “Stuck Case Remover Body” for the next step. If you are a do-it-yourselfer and have the bit and tap, this piece is easily replicated by a length of electrical conduit of the proper diameter and some washers. In either case, this tool provides a standoff for the screw that will do the actual pulling.

pulling72fingers72

With an Allen Wrench, Finish the Job
Run the screw through the standoff and into the tapped case head. With a wrench, tighten the screw which hopefully pulls the case free. Once the case is free, clamp the case in a vice and pull it free of the de-capping pin. There is tension here because the sizing ball is oversized to the neck dimension as part of the sizing process. It doesn’t take much force, but be aware there is still this last little hurdle to clear before you get back to loading. Don’t feel bad, everyone does this. Just use more lube next time!

wholekit72unstuck72

Article find by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tech Tip No Comments »
January 8th, 2019

6.5×47 Tactical Tack-Driver — The Non-Creedmoor ‘Six-Five’

6.5x47 Lapua Tactical Rifle Ryan Pierce Brux Barrel H4350 Berger Hybrid

A couple seasons back we published our comprehensive 6.5×47 Lapua Cartridge Guide, researched by the 6.5 Guys. In case you’ve been wondering what kind of accuracy is possible for a tactical-type rifle chambered for this mid-sized cartridge, check out this tack-driver built by gunsmith Ryan Pierce. That’s a mighty impressive 0.206″ five-shot group fired with Berger 140gr Hybrids using a Brux cut-rifled barrel. The powder was Hodgdon H4350, a very good choice for this cartridge.

6.5x47 Lapua Tactical Rifle Ryan Pierce Brux Barrel H4350 Berger Hybrid

Ryan reports: “Here is a 6.5×47 I built for a customer. It features a trued Rem 700 action, Brux 1:8″ Rem varmint-contour barrel, Mcmillan thumbhole stock, Surgeon bottom metal, and 3-port muzzle brake. The customer’s preferred load is the same that has worked in the last couple dozen 6.5x47s I’ve built: 41.1-41.3 grains of H4350 with 140 hybrids .050″ off the lands. This should run about 2810-2815 fps from a 26″ barrel. The 3.128″ refers to length of a loaded round from the base to ogive including the Hornady ogive comparator tool.”

6.5x47 Lapua Tactical Rifle Ryan Pierce Brux Barrel H4350 Berger Hybrid

Yep, It Measures Up…
Lest anyone dispute Ryan’s measurement of this group (the internet is full of nay-sayers), 0.206″ is EXACTLY what we got when we measured this group using OnTarget software. See for yourself:

6.5x47 Lapua Tactical Rifle Ryan Pierce

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, Tactical 5 Comments »