January 10th, 2019

Savage Will Launch 40 New Products at 2019 SHOT Show

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage will launch 40 new products at the 2019 SHOT Show in Las Vegas. This will be a big year for Savage as 2019 marks Savage’s 125th Anniversary. The brand is celebrating the historic event by offering limited-edition rifles as well as many new offerings in bolt-action rifles, AR-platform rifles, and shotguns. “Whether you are looking for a training rifle, a competition-grade modern sporting rifle, a reliable shotgun for hunting or personal defense, or a lightweight hunting rifle packaged with a scope, Savage has those needs covered, plus more”, said Savage’s Marketing Director, Beth Shimanski.

New 2019 Product Launch Highlights

The company is expanding and improving its popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock. The AccuFit system lets shooters quickly adjust comb height and length-of-pull. The feature is an integral part of a new long-range rifle with a superior finish, the 110 High Country, featured below:

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles
Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage is expanding the popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage’s MSR 15 and MSR 10 AR-platform rifle series will include new options for long range, precision and competition shooting. These rifles are not cookie-cutter AR clones. The MSR Savages have some interesting upgrades, such as side-charging handles (on MSR 10), Magpul PRS stocks, adjustable gas blocks, and tunable muzzle brakes. The MSRs also enjoy a good reputation for build quality and reliability.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

All of these new rifles, as well as more bolt-action and semi-automatic centerfire and rimfire rifles, will be on display at SHOT Show Booth No. 14551 January 22-25, 2019 at the Sands Expo Center.

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January 10th, 2019

Bullet Bell Curve — Sorting by OAL vs. Base-to-Ogive vs. Weight

Bullet, Sort, Jacket, Sierra, USAMU, Sort, Bell Curve, Distribution, OAL

The USAMU has published a “how-to” article about bullet sorting. While many of us may sort bullets by base-to-ogive length (and/or weight), the USAMU story explores the “how and why” of sorting bullets by Overall Length (OAL). Read the article highlights below, and make your own decision as to whether OAL sorting is worth the time and effort. Bryan Litz of Applied Ballistics says that sorting by OAL is not a bad idea, but base-to-ogive bullet sorting probably represents a better investment of your time.

USAMU

Bullet Sorting by Overall Length

We’d like to share a specialized handloading technique which we’ve long found beneficial to our long-range (600 yards and beyond) accuracy. Sorting of bullets for extreme long range (LR) accuracy is not difficult to do, but some background in theory is needed.

Here at USAMU’s Handloading Shop, we only sort individual bullets for the most demanding Long-Range applications and important competitions. Only the most accurate rifles and shooters can fully exploit the benefits of this technique. The basic sorting process involves measuring the Overall Length (OAL) of the bullets, and grouping them in 0.001″ increments. It’s not unusual to find lots of match bullets that vary as much as 0.015″-0.020″ in length throughout the lot, although lots with much less variation are seen as well. Even in bullet lots with 0.015″ OAL variation, the bullet base-to-ogive length will show much less variation. Hence, our basic sort is by bullet OAL. One obvious benefit of sorting is easily seen in the attached photo. The few bullets that are VERY different from the average are culled out, reducing probable fliers.

How does one know what OAL increments to use when sorting? The answer is simple. As each lot of bullets is unique in its OAL distribution, it’s best to sample your bullet lot and see how they are distributed. In the attached photo, you will see a set of loading trays with a strip of masking tape running along the bottom. Each vertical row of holes is numbered in 0.001″ increments corresponding to the bullets’ OAL. A digital caliper makes this task much easier. As each bullet is measured, it is placed in the line of holes for its’ OAL, and gradually, a roughly bell-shaped curve begins to form.

Note that near the center, bullets are much more plentiful than near the edges. At the extreme edges, there are a few that differ markedly from the average, and these make great chronograph or sighting-in fodder. We recommend using a sample of 200 bullets from your lot, and 300 is even better. Some bullet lots are very consistent, with a tall, narrow band of highly-uniform bullets clustered together over just a few thousandths spread. Other lots will show a long, relatively flat curve (less uniform), and you may also see curves with 2 or more “spikes” separated by several 0.001″ OAL increments.

Bryan Litz Applied Ballistics Bullet Sorting AccurateShooter.com

Bullet Sorting (OAL vs. Base-to-Ogive vs. Weight) — Litz Talks

I’m often asked what is a the best measure to sort bullets by, and the answer (to this and many other questions in ballistics) is: it depends.

Choosing to sort by overall length (OAL), base to ogive (BTO), bearing surface, weight, etc. can get overwhelming. Shooters typically look for something they can measure, which shows a variation and sort by that. It’s common for dimensional variations to correlate. For example, bullets which are longer in OAL are typically also shorter in BTO, and have longer noses. All these are symptoms of a bullet that was pushed a little further into the pointing die, or possibly had more than average lube while being swaged. So in essence, if you sort by BTO, you’re measuring one symptom which can indicate a pattern in the bullets shape.

So, the question still stands — what should you measure? You’ll always see more variation in OAL than BTO, so it’s easier to sort by OAL. But sometimes the bullet tips can be jagged and have small burrs which can be misleading. Measuring BTO will result in a lower spread, but is a more direct measure of bullet uniformity.

Then there’s the question of; how much variation is too much, or, how many bins should you sort into? Shooters who see 0.025” variation in BTO may choose to sort into 5 bins of 0.005”. But if you have only 0.005” variation in the box, you’ll still sort into 5 bins of 0.001”. What’s correct? You have to shoot to know. Live fire testing will answer more questions, and answer them more decisively than any amount of discussion on the subject. The test I recommend is to identify bullets on the extreme short end of the spectrum, and some on the extreme long end. Load at least 10 rounds of each, and take turns shooting 5-shot groups with them. If there is a difference, it will be evident. The results of the testing will answer your question of: should I sort based on X, Y, or Z?”

You can read more discussion on this and other similar subjects in the new Ballistics & Bullets board in the Accurateshooter.com forum. Here’s a link to the thread which is discussing bullet sorting: Bullet Sorting Thread

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading No Comments »
January 10th, 2019

Dennis DeMille Becomes General Manager at Tactical Walls

Creedmoor sports Tactical Walls Dennis Demille GM General Manager concealment

If you’ve ever attended one of the major CMP games, you’ve probably seen Dennis DeMille, former General Manager of Creedmoor Sports. A two-time National Rifle Champion, Dennis helped teach High Power Clinics and he has shared his marksmanship knowledge in many ways. Now Dennis is undertaking a fresh challenge — as the new General Manager of Virginia-based Tactical Walls, a leader in specialized USA-made gun storage/concealment systems. As the Tactical Walls GM, Dennis will oversee operations and new product development. Dennis brings with him more than 20 years of active duty Marine Corps service and nearly 14 years of experience managing Creedmoor Sports.

Dennis is pleased to be working with Tactical Walls: “Tactical Walls was the pioneer in concealing firearms in plain sight. Working with people who are passionate about what they produce, who possess that level of creativity, and at a company with limitless manufacturing ability, makes me very excited about the future of Tactical Walls. It’s a real honor and my sincere privilege to now be part of this team. Please feel free to contact me directly at dennis [at] tacticalwalls.com”.

Creedmoor sports Tactical Walls Dennis Demille GM General Manager concealment

Tim Matter, founder and President of Tactical Walls states: “Dennis’ manufacturing and operations experience will help [extend] the tremendous growth and product development we experienced in 2018. We are proud and excited to have him on our team. Stop by and visit us at our booth at SHOT Show later this month or check us out at www.tacticalwalls.com”.

Shooting Tips with Dennis DeMille

Dennis DeMille Creedmoor Sports Rifle Sling video training set-up

Sling Shooting Tip — The Benefits of Leather
Above, Dennis shows a young competitor at the CMP Western Games how to adjust his leather sling. “Many shooters shy away from using a leather sling because they have never been taught how to use one. That’s unfortunate. A leather sling offers more support than a web sling, which is important when competing with the heavier than normal rifles.” — Dennis DeMille

Dennis DeMille High PowerThe Benefits of Dry-Fire Training
Once you set up your sling properly, you’ll need practice. Dennis DeMille stresses the importance of dry-fire practice with sling and shooting coat. Dry-Fire training is essential to the sling disciplines. DeMille, a past National Service Rifle Champion, told us that, for every minute he spent in actual competition, he would spend hours practicing without ammunition. While in the USMC, Dennis would practice in the barracks, working on his hold and dry-firing:

“The most important thing is to spend time off the range practicing. Most of what I learned as a High Power shooter I learned without ammunition — just spending time dry firing and doing holding exercises. Holding exercises will really identify the weak parts of your position. The primary purpose of dry firing is to get you used to shooting an empty rifle. If you can shoot a loaded rifle the same way you shoot an empty rifle then eventually you will become a High Master.”

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