January 11th, 2019

New .375 Caliber ELR Solid Projectiles from Berger Bullets

Berger bullets elr solid copper .375 caliber vld bullet new

This is BIG news for the Extreme Long Range (ELR) game. Berger Bullets will offer a line of SOLID bullets in .375 caliber. You read that right — these will be the first-ever large diameter Berger projectiles manufactured from a solid copper alloy. Most conventional bullets feature a jacket over a metal core, typically lead alloy. These new Berger solids are lathe-turned from solid copper alloy — shaped with precision into perfect aerodynamic profiles. The new Berger ELR solids boast a long, VLD shape with ultra-high Ballistic Coefficients. The new .375 caliber Berger ELR solids will be offered in two bullet weights: 379 grains and 407 grains.

The prototype 400gr version of this solid bullet was extensively tested at 2400 yards (above). It remained supersonic at that distance, a remarkable 1.36 miles. Berger will now offer two production versions, 379gr and 407gr, based on this successful prototype, further optimized. Here is Berger’s official release:

Berger Bullets proudly announces the New Extreme Long Range (ELR) Match Solid Projectile line, beginning with .375 caliber 379 grain and 407 grain offerings.

Extreme Long-Range shooting to distances of two miles and beyond has taken the firearms community by storm. With much of its roots developed from elite military sniper and Special Forces rifle training, ELR enthusiasts are utilizing highly innovative rifle and ammunition technology to engage targets at distances previously unheard of. Berger has taken the lead pioneering ELR, similar to how it’s dominated all other long-range rifle disciplines.

Berger Bullets chief ballistician Bryan Litz states: “Our new ELR Solid Match Bullets provide both competition shooters and Mil/LE forces a long-range solid projectile like no other. Its highly-optimized VLD ogive design and lathe-turned solid copper construction provide a ballistic advantage that is unmatched by any conventional-style bullet.”

Berger .375 Caliber Bullet is a Winner
Berger’s .375 caliber solid bullet design has already been proven in competition. At the 2018 World Longest Shot Challenge (WLSC), Team Applied Ballistics used the prototype .375 Cal ELR solid with great results. The new .375 caliber monolithic Berger bullet designed by Bryan Litz was used by the first and second place finishers in the “above .338 caliber” class. The prototype .375 Cal solid performed great, and the ultra-high BC was confirmed. READ WLSC Story HERE.

Advanced Doppler Radar was used to confirm Ballistics Data for the new Berger .375-Caliber Solids:
Berger monolithic solid bullet .375 caliber VLD copper lathe-turned projectile

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product, News 8 Comments »
January 11th, 2019

Bed It Right! Bedding Compounds Compared by Speedy

Marine-Tex Pillar Bedding Marine-Tex Bedding Block Aluminum Actions

A customer of well-known gunsmith (and Hall-of-Fame shooter) Thomas “Speedy” Gonzalez recently asked Speedy about bedding compounds. Speedy offered some interesting advice based on long-term testing of various materials. Speedy favors Marine-Tex because it is very stable over time, while other materials can shrink up to 6% dimensionally. A good bedding job should be a perfect fit to your barreled action. If the bedding material shrinks over time, that is NOT a good thing….

Speedy’s customer asked: “I know you’re not a Devcon man in regards to bedding compounds but I respect your input in such matters and my question is this in regard to aluminum actions. If Devcon was considered, for an aluminum action, would you prefer aluminum compound formula or steel formula? I personally prefer Devcon steel and Marine-Tex for steel receivers but my experience with aluminum is limited. Also do you have a release agent preference that works better with aluminum?”

Speedy answered: “My only preference of one epoxy over another is their stability over time. My buddy who works for the Texas State Weights and Measures Department had me cast several of the most common types of epoxies used for bedding into 1.000″ machined blocks. After one year of being kept in a controlled climate and measured for shrinkage monthly, the Marine Tex shrunk only 1/10th of 1% (i.e. 0.1%) whereas almost all the others (including Devcon Steel formula, Devcon Aluminum formula…) shrunk 3% to 6%. The only other compounds that matched the Marine Tex were Araldite 1253 and Araldite 2014, with the latter being quite expensive for daily use.”

Marine-Tex Pillar Bedding Marine-Tex Bedding Block Aluminum Actions

Speedy added: “The Marine Tex Grey has no atomized metal in its makeup even though it appears that it does. This can be proven by the use of a strong neodymium magnet. What is humorous to me is that people don’t like aluminum yet will bed their actions atop aluminum pillars that have twice the coefficient of expansion (COE) of steel. Like Devcon, it is what people have always done and used. Thus [they] perpetuate the same old stuff. That’s my two cents’ worth. But as I tell everyone, ‘I’ll tell you what I know or do, but it’s not my job to convince anyone to do it my way’.”

Release Agents — Try Shoe Polish
Regarding release agents, Speedy stated: “I use Kiwi Neutral or Tan shoe polish. This works great and you can find it anywhere. Do NOT use the black or brown as it will stick.”

Marine-Tex Pillar Bedding Marine-Tex Bedding Block Aluminum Actions

View More Photos of Speedy Inletting and Bedding Job
CLICK HERE to see an interesting bedding job done by Speedy using a custom titanium bedding block. Speedy notes, “The stock was a raw blank requiring full inletting for the action to fit properly plus the titanium block. All the loading ports, bolt handle cut, bolt stop, and trigger guard cuts were done with diamond tooling to eliminate fraying and/or delamination of the wood.” You’ll find more projects by Speedy on his Facebook Page. Speedy is in San Antonio, Texas now, and accepting new projects with his company S.G. Rifles LLC.

Permalink - Articles, Gunsmithing, Tech Tip No Comments »
January 11th, 2019

Get FREE Official AccurateShooter.com Precision Targets

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target
Right-Click target image to download printable PDF.

We created the above target a decade ago. Since then it has been used by tens of thousands of shooters. It has proven very popular as a load development target, since all your load data fits neatly in the boxes under each target. In fact this target is being employed by both rifle-makers and barrel-makers (including Criterion) to test their products. The target was designed for aiming efficiency. The diamonds have 1/2″ sides and you can align your cross-hairs on the horizontal and vertical lines. It is a clean design that is easy to see even at 200 yards with a 20X scope. When we test, we usually crank in a little elevation, setting the point-of-impact higher, so that our shots fall in the gray circles. That way you leave the squares intact for precise aiming.

We also use these two targets for load development and precision practice. The circle dot target can also be used for informal rimfire competition at 50 yards.
Right-Click Each Target to Download Printable PDFs.

FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target FREE Accuracy Precision Rifle Shooting Target


GET 50 More FREE Targets on AccurateShooter Target Page »

Printing Targets card stock heavy paper benchrestHow to Print Your Targets
Most of us have access to a printer at home or at work. That means you can print your own targets. You’ll find hundreds of free target designs online, including dozens of downloadable targets on our AccurateShooter.com Target Page. If you’re feeling creative, you can design your own target with a computer drawing program such as MS Paint.

Paper Stock Is Important
If you want your self-printed targets to show shots cleanly (and not rip when it gets windy), you should use quality paper stock. We recommend card stock — the kind of thick paper used for business cards. Card stock is available in both 65-lb and 110-lb weights in a variety of colors. We generally print black on white. But you might experiment with bright orange or yellow sheets. Forum Member ShootDots report: “They sell cardstock at Fed-Ex Kinko! I use either Orange or Yellow. That makes it easy to see the bullet holes clearly.” On some printers, with the heavier 110-lb card stock, you will need to have the paper exit through the rear for a straighter run.

Printing Targets card stock heavy paper benchrest

Here are some Target-Printing Tips from our Forum members:

“Staples sells a 67-lb heavy stock that I have settled on. I use the light grey or light blue, either of these are easy on the eyes on bright days. I have used the 110-lb card stock as well and it works fine. It’s just a little easier to print the lighter stuff.” (JBarnwell)

“Cardstock, as mentioned, works great for showing bullet holes as it doesn’t tear or rip like the thin, lightweight 20-lb paper. I’ve never had a problem with cardstock feeding in the printer, just don’t stick too many sheets in there. If I need three targets, I load only three card stock sheets”. (MEMilanuk)

“20-lb bond works pretty well for me if I use a spray adhesive and stick the entire back of the paper’s surface to the backer board.” (Lapua40X)

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, Shooting Skills 1 Comment »