March 17th, 2019

Like Father Like Son — Emil Praslick IV Shoots First Rifle Match

father son emil praslick iii iv 3 4 f-tr .223 rem factory ammo x-count USAMU

Here’s a great “feel-good” story. You’ve probably heard of Emil Praslick III. He’s considered one of the best rifle coaches and wind readers on the planet. Now retired from the military, SFC Praslick served with the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) as coach and instructor for many years. He also coached many USA rifle teams in international competition.

father son emil praslick iii iv 3 4 f-tr .223 rem factory ammo x-count USAMU

Well Emil has a son, who carries on the family lineage as Emil Praslick IV (EPIV). Young Emil just shot his first rifle competition, an F-TR event. Remarkably, the young man, just 12 years old, Beat “pops” in the final match of the day by four Xs. Well done!

Father Emil reports: “Took my son, Emil IV, who just turned 12, to his first rifle match today. He shot F-TR at 600 yards with a .223 Rem bolt rifle, factory 77 grain ammunition, and bipod. He had a blast, and in the last match, beat his old man by 4 Xs shooting the same setup. Great day, today.” Referring to EPIV, father Emil added: “He’s got the bug! If I start hand-loading for that rifle, he might be dangerous!”

Here are some comments from Facebook friends:

“Literal chip off the old block! Well done EPIV and his coach, EPIII” — Kelly H.

“That’s awesome!” — SFC Brandon Green (USAMU), 3-time Nat’l High Power Champion

“You are learning a new phase to your coaching playbook. One that has the potential for the very best memories. Good on you and best wishes!” — Kent Reeve

“I think you will find Emil, that shooting with your kids, and watching them ‘get it’ and their performance improve match to match, will be more satisfying than anything else you’ve ever done on a range. For you especially that will be significant, but I think that it will still hold true.” — Lance E.

“Good shooting young man. [Father] Emil… better get used to being beat by those young eyes. Been in your shoes.” — Tracy Hogg

“Emil… Tell your son you hate reloading. Teach him how and then tell him if he doesn’t have enough ammo he can’t shoot because you don’t have enough time to load your own and ammo is too expensive to buy! Congratulations and thank you for helping Amanda so much!” — Paul Elsenboss (father of USAMU shooter Amanda Elsenboss)

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills No Comments »
March 17th, 2019

Hunter Training and Mentoring Programs — State by State

Hunter hunt hunting recruitment mentor mentoring junior novice training license licensing programs
Photo from Nebraska Mentored Hunts.

The number of active hunters in the USA has declined in recent years. That’s not good for wildlife management programs, which are supported, in large part, by hunting fees. Perhaps more importantly, the declin in the ranks of hunters weakens the base of support for the Second Amendment. Hunters are key to the future of firearms rights in America. We support efforts to increase the number of hunters, through mentoring and training programs.

The NRA’s American Hunter magazine has compiled a comprehensive list of hunting mentor programs, state by state. This is followed by listing of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that provide hunter training. If you know individuals looking to get a start in hunting, check out these resources.

Hunter hunt hunting recruitment mentor mentoring junior novice training license licensing programs

State Hunter Mentoring and Training Progams

Alabama | 205-339-5716
• Hunting Programs: outdooralabama.com/hunting

Alaska | 907-267-2534
• Hunter Education: huntereducation.alaska.gov

Arizona | 602-942-3000
• Mentor Camps: azgfd.com/Hunting/MentoredCamps/

Arkansas | 800-364-4263
• Arkansas Outdoors: agfc.com/en/get-involved/first-steps-outdoors/

California | 916-653-1235
• Programs: wildlife.ca.gov/hunter-education
• Apprentice Hunting Licenses: nrm.dfg.ca.gov/ApprenticeHunts/Default.aspx

Colorado | 303-291-7248
• Hunter Outreach: cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/HunterOutreach.aspx

Connecticut | 860-424-3000
• Junior Hunter
: ct.gov/deep/JuniorHunter

Delaware | 302-739-9910
• Hunter Ed
: dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/HunterEd/Pages/HunterEd.aspx

Florida | 850-488-4676
• Mentor Program: myfwc.com/hunting/safety-education/mentoring/
• Youth Program: myfwc.com/education/outdoor-skills/youth-hunting-program/

Georgia | 706-557-2335
• Mentor Program: georgiawildlife.com/mentor

Idaho | 208-334-3700
• Hunt Passport: idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/passport

Illinois | 217-300-5352
• Learn to Hunt: publish.illinois.edu/hunttrapillinois/
• Apprentice License: dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/pages/apprenticelicense.aspx

Indiana | 317-233-9382
• Hunting: in.gov/dnr/fishwild/2701.htm

Iowa | 515-725-8200
• Learn to Hunt: iowadnr.gov/Hunting/Hunter-Education/Learn-to-Hunt

Kansas | 620-672-5911
• Hunter Recruitment: ksoutdoors.com/Hunting/Hunting-Programs/Hunter-Recruitment
• Outdoor Mentors: outdoormentors.org/
• Youth Hunts: ksoutdoors.com/Hunting/Special-Hunts-Information

Kentucky | 800-858-1549 Ext. 4475; 502-330-8487
• Hunter’s Legacy Program: fw.ky.gov/Hunt/Pages/Hunter%27s-Legacy.aspx
• Field to Fork Program: fw.ky.gov/Pages/FieldtoFork.aspx

(more…)

Permalink Hunting/Varminting, News, Shooting Skills No Comments »
March 17th, 2019

Vihtavuori Explains Powder Grain Shapes

Vihtavuori loading propellant reloading powder N133 N150 N140 N550 ball flake stick extruded perforated powders

POWDER GRAIN SHAPES — What You Need to Know

The shape of powder grains has a profound effect on the performance of the powder charge, as it concerns both pressure and velocity. There are multiple powder shapes including flake, ball, and extruded or “stick” (both solid and perforated).

All Vihtavuori reloading powders are of the cylindrical, single-perforated extruded stick type. The differences in burning rate between the powders depend on the size of the grain, the wall thickness of the cylinder, the surface coating and the composition. Cylindrical extruded powders can also have multi-perforated grains. The most common types are the 7- and 19-perforated varieties. A multi-perforated powder grain is naturally of a much larger size than one with a single perforation, and is typically used for large caliber ammunition.

Other types of powder grain shapes include sphere or ball, and flake. The ball grains are typically used in automatic firearms but also in rifles and handguns. The ball grain is less costly to produce, as it is not pressed into shape like cylindrical grains. Flake shaped grains are typically used in shotgun loadings.

Vihtavuori loading propellant reloading powder N133 N150 N140 N550 ball flake stick extruded perforated powders

Web thickness in gunpowder terminology means the minimum distance that the combustion zones can travel within the powder grain without encountering each other. In spherical powders, this distance is the diameter of the “ball”; in flake powder it is the thickness of the flake; and in multi-perforated extruded powders it is the minimum distance (i.e. wall thickness) between the perforations.

The burning rate of powder composed of grains without any perforations or surface treatment is related to the surface area of the grain available for burning at any given pressure level. The change in the surface area that is burning during combustion is described by a so-called form function. If the surface area increases, the form function does likewise and its behavior is termed progressive. If the form function decreases, its behavior is said to be degressive. If the flame area remains constant throughout the combustion process, we describe it as “neutral” behavior.

The cylindrical, perforated powders are progressive; the burning rate increases as the surface area increases, and the pressure builds up slower, increasing until it reaches its peak and then collapses. Flake and ball grains are degressive; the total powder surface area and pressure are at their peak at ignition, decreasing as the combustion progresses.

So how does the shape affect pressure and muzzle velocity? In general, it can be said that powder that burns progressively achieves a desired muzzle velocity at lower maximum pressure than a powder that burns neutrally, not to mention a degressive powder. As grain size increases, the maximum pressure moves towards the muzzle, also increasing muzzle blast. Muzzle velocity and pressure can be adjusted by means of the amount of powder or loading density, i.e. the relationship between the powder mass and the volume available to it. As the loading density increases, maximum pressure grows.

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Vihtavuori loading propellant reloading powder N133 N150 N140 N550 ball flake stick extruded perforated powders


This article originally appeared on the Vihtavuori Website.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »