April 30th, 2019

Scope Comparisons — Video Resources on the Web

riflescope optic scope test video comparison review product movie

Are you shopping for a long range optic? Unfortunately, it is pretty much impossible to “test drive” a half-dozen or more optics. Thankfully, there are some video reviews on the internet that are, for the most part, helpful. Pew Pew Tactical (PPT) recently did a lengthy comparison of nine long range scopes. For each model PPT examined clarity, eye relief, reticle design, parallax, and windage/elevation travel. For each optic PPT also provides short videos showing the operation of the controls. FULL PPT REVIEW HERE.

NINE Long Range Scopes Compared
1. Vortex Strike Eagle 4-24×50mm
2. Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50mm
3. Leupold VX3i LRP 8.5-25×50mm
4. Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56mm
5. Burris XTR II 5-25×50mm
6. Steiner PX4i 4-16×56mm
7. EOTech Vudu 5-25×56mm
8. Primary Arms 6-30×56mm
9. Schmidt & Bender PMII 5-25×56mm

The Firearm Blog — $2500 Leupold vs. $400 Athlon

This is actually a pretty good video. The host, Joel, tests and compares the Leupold Mark 5 vs. the Athlon Argos. Joel considers a variety of performance categories including clarity, tracking, elevation travel, ergonomics, and reticle options. This video asked the question “Can a $400 scope hang with a much higher priced optic?” You might be surprised how well the Athlon actually did.

Kalibre 22 — High-End Tactical Optics Comparison

In this video, Todd Hodnett explains the pros and cons of different brands and types of scopes. Scopes tested include Horus, Leupold, Nightforce, Schmidt & Bender, and Vortex. He uses the scopes in the field, and actually does a pretty good job describing the pros and cons of each model.

Top 10 Reviews — Manufacturer Marketing Videos Compilation

This video covers ten different scope models, from budget to high-end. For the most part the scopes appear in cost order, with the more affordable optics first. This YouTube video is mostly pieced together from manufacturer marketing footage, but it does cover a wide variety of scope options.

Please note, the above video does has some actual review segments, but nearly all the content is provided by the scope makers. So the Top 10 rankings are somewhat arbitrary. Nonetheless it is handy to have ten scopes covered in a single video. In order of appearance, here are the ten scopes featured, with video time marks if you want to “fast forward” to particular models.

TEN Scopes In Order of Display
10. Burris Veracity Riflescope: 00:23
9. Vortex Viper PST Gen II Riflescope: 01:24
8. Nikon BLACK FX1000 Riflescope: 03:18
7. ATN X-Sight 4K PRO Riflescope: 04:29
6. Bushnell Engage™ Riflescope 06:00
5. Leica Magnus i Riflescope: 07:50
4. Nightforce ATACR 5-25x56mm F1 Riflescope: 08:29
3. Vanguard Endeavor RS IV Riflescope: 10:31
2. Leupold Mark 8 Riflescope: 12:33
1. Swarovski Z8i Riflescope: 14:21

Great Deals on Vortex Now
Looking for a great deal on a new scope? Leading vendor EuroOptic has a wide variety of Vortex Scopes at deeply discounted close-out prices now:

riflescope optic scope test video comparison review product movie

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics, Tactical 1 Comment »
April 30th, 2019

Boomer Time — G.A. Precision Upgrades an Armalite .50 BMG

Wide Open Magazine video .50 Caliber 50 BMG Fifty G.A. Precision GA 50-Cal
This Armalite AR-50A1 .50 BMG rifle was modified by G.A. Precision.

If you’re a fan of big boomers, and love shooting steel, then definitely watch this Wide Open Magazine video. This covers a .50 BMG build by our friends at G.A. Precision (GAP). The rifle started as an Armalite AR-50A1 ($3359.00 MSRP). Then GAP fluted the barrel and swapped the factory muzzle brake with a more compact brake from American Precision Arms*. Then, as modified, the entire rig was given a rugged Cerakote finish.

The video has nice background music, great aerial drone footage, and of course some serious firepower. Using Hornady .50 BMG ammo, GA Precision’s George Gardner and his Wide Open friends shoot the big Fifty from the bench as well as prone. Enjoy!

Wide Open Magazine video .50 Caliber 50 BMG Fifty G.A. Precision GA 50-Cal

Wide Open Magazine video .50 Caliber 50 BMG Fifty G.A. Precision GA 50-Cal

About the .50 BMG Cartridge

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, aka 12.7×99mm NATO or 50 Browning) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s, entering official service in 1921. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries.

.50 Browning Machine Gun 50 BMG Noreen Rifle

John Browning had the idea for this round during World War I in response to a need for an anti-aircraft weapon, based on a scaled-up .30-06 Springfield design, used in a machine gun based on a scaled-up M1919/M1917 design that Browning had initially developed around 1900. According to the American Rifleman: “The Browning .50 originated in the Great War. American interest in an armor-piercing cartridge was influenced by the marginal French 11 mm design, prompting U.S. Army Ordnance officers to consult Browning. They wanted a heavy projectile at 2700 FPS, but the ammunition did not exist. Browning pondered the situation and, according to his son John, replied, ‘Well, the cartridge sounds pretty good to start. You make up some cartridges and we’ll do some shooting’.”

* In the video, George mistakenly says “American Patriot Arms”, but the brake is made by Georgia-based American Precision Arms.

Permalink - Videos, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
April 30th, 2019

Pistol Instructor Offers Critic A Slice of Humble Pie

Smith Wesson pistol accuracy Grutter M&P 45 .45 ACP Winchester ammo
Shown is the Smith & Wesson M&P 9mm model. The M&P 45 is the same except for chambering.

You’ll hear some shooters complain loudly about the (perceived) lack of accuracy of their handguns. Well, sometimes the problem IS the gun, but other times the problem is “driver error”. At the range, we often hear guys blame their gun for poor accuracy, when in fact the real problem is lack of operator skill. This saga, posted recently on Facebook, is a case in point.

Here’s the story. A gentleman attending an armorer’s course at Smith & Wesson was loudly dissing a S&W M&P 45, claiming it could not shoot. Very loudly he tells the instructor, “the M&P 45 one of our officers is carrying is sh*t”. He then trash-talks the gun, saying that both he and his officer couldn’t get the gun to shoot decent groups, either with FMJ or duty ammo.

Well it seems that Gregory Grutter, S&W’s Chief Firearms Instructor, happened to overhear these vociferous complaints, so Grutter asked to test-fire the M&P 45 pistol. Grutter put a couple of his business cards up at 15 yards, then shot one with Winchester Ranger SXT and the other with Winchester White Box ammo. Grutter’s best group was about half an inch, measured with OnTarget. Check it out:

Smith Wesson pistol accuracy Grutter M&P 45 .45 ACP Winchester ammo

We’re told that, after hearing the litany of complaints, Grutter walked over to the loud-mouthed grumbler and asked: “Hey Sir, can I shoot it?

“Have at it, I don’t want that POS back!” said Mr. Negative.

Kharma time baby… In Grutter’s hands the M&P performed superbly. Here are Grutter’s two 5-shot groups, each shot at 15 yards with the .45 ACP Smith & Wesson pistol. Pretty darn impressive:

Smith Wesson pistol accuracy Grutter M&P 45 .45 ACP Winchester ammo

After seeing this, the complainer asked: “Why did you shoot your cards — Ain’t got no targets?”

Grutter smiled and replied: “Nah… in case you or your officer want to learn how to shoot [this way] you will have the numbers to call.” Badda Bing!

Permalink Handguns, Shooting Skills 4 Comments »