June 11th, 2019

Wet-Tumbling Cartridge Brass — Some Smart Solutions

Cartridge brass case tumbler thumblers wet brass stainless media lapua cleaning

Ace tactical shooter and gunsmith Jim See of Elite Accuracy LLC recently tested a Frankford Arsenal rotary brass tumbler. Like the older Thumbler’s Tumblers, this can tumble your cases in a liquid solution. The wet-tumbling process worked very well Jim reports. Posting on Facebook, Jim noted: “I was super impressed with the Frankford Arsenal rotary tumbler and cleaning packs they sent me. I ran 350 pieces of brass for one hour. They now look great.” Jim appreciated not having to deal with dry tumbling media, such as crushed walnut shells. Dry media produces dust and can leave residues or clog flash-holes.

Cartridge brass case tumbler thumblers Frankford Arsenal wet brass stainless media lapua cleaning

Interestingly, Jim recommends you try wet-tumbling WITHOUT using stainless media. At least give it a try. Tumbling without media simplifies the process and you don’t have to worry about pins stuck in flash-holes or case-necks*. Jim reports: “Stainless steel pins come with the Frankford kit, but mine hit the trash right out of the box. There is no need to clean the inside of your cases 100% and that’s all the pins add to the equation. The brass bumping brass with hot water and Frankford’s liquid cleaner works great all by itself.” One wag stated: “That’s great to hear. Stainless steel pins are a PITA.”

Other Facebook posters concurred with Jim’s evaluation of the Frankford Arsenal Rotary Tumbler:

“I’ve had one for a couple years, and it works well. I usually run about 250-300 Dasher cases at once in it. But I use the pins because I’m OCD about clean brass.” — David W.

“I’ve had one for a year and a half and it definitely works with or without pins.” — Luke C.

“I got one about six months ago and have yet to use any SS media. I just use some dawn, distilled water, and Lemi Shine®. Turns nasty 5.56 range brass bright and shiny.” — Brian D.

“I don’t use the pins either and use a combination of Dawn soap and Lemi Shine.” — Jon N.G.

This video shows how to assemble and operate the Frankford rotary tumbler. But note, Jim See does NOT feel that it is necessary to use stainless media.

How to Dry Your Brass — Hair Dryer Vs. Machine

The downside of wet tumbling is that you end up with a pile of wet brass at the end of the cleaning cycle. There are many ways to dry brass, from drying in the sun to using a kitchen oven (be careful not to “overcook” your brass). One Facebook poster asked Jim: “What is your drying method for wet brass, and how long does it take?”

Jim See replied: “To start I just drain off the dirty water, and rinse the brass with clean hot water. Then I roll the brass on a towel for 30 seconds and put the brass in a one-gallon bucket. Next I insert a hair dryer in the bucket (with the brass) and let it run for about 5 minutes. With this procedure, the drying process for me is done in less than 10 minutes.”

Jack Lanhart has another method: “I use a food dehydrator. It takes 30 to 45 minutes.”

Cartridge brass case tumbler thumblers wet brass Frankford Arsenal stainless media lapua cleaning dryer dyhydrator frankford Lyman Cyclone

For those who don’t want to mess with towels and hair dryers, Frankford Arsenal offers a matching Platinum Series Case Dryer that simplifies the process of drying brass. Lyman also makes an excellent Cyclone Case Dryer. Both drying machines cost about $60.00 and both have multiple levels so you can separate different types of cartridge brass. Lyman states that “The forced heated air circulation of the Cyclone will dry your brass inside and out within an hour or two, with no unsightly water spots.” The Lyman dryer can also be used for ultrasonically-cleaned gun parts.

Cyclone Lyman Case cartridge dryer dehydrator


*The Frankford Rotary tumbler does include media separators if you choose to use the provided pins or other media. CLICK HERE for diagram showing how to use media separators.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
June 11th, 2019

New NX8 Scopes from Nightforce with 8X Zoom

Nightforce new NX8 riflescope scope 8X magnification light weight EuroOptic

New Nightforce NX8 Scopes Serve Both Tactical and Hunting Roles
With its new NX8 offerings, Nightforce offers full-featured tactical scopes that are light and compact enough for hunting. Nightforce’s NEW NX8 Scopes bridge the gap between hunting and tactical optics — allowing shooters to get greater performance out of a smaller, lighter package. Nightforce says it has accomplished that without compromising durability, functionality, or optical clarity that has made their scopes so popular.

The two new additions to the NX8 line are the 2.5-20×50 F1 and the 4-32×50 F1 with both magnification options offered in the MOAR and MIL-C Reticles. Nightforce has managed to build a package that combines an impressive zoom range with a compact scope body while still providing tons of travel, close parallax adjustment, and refined First Focal Plane (F1) reticles.

Jason at EuroOptic explains: “These scopes represent a movement that has been brewing towards hybrid use scopes (hunting and target/tactical) and are some of the best executions of that trend thus far. We expect that these additions to the NX8 series will be immensely popular and will spur further development in this category.”

STATUS: EuroOptic expects the new NX8 models to arrive in July. EuroOptic is currently taking pre-orders for all four new NX8 scopes — CLICK links below.

New Nightforce NX8 Riflescopes:

NX8 2.5-20x50mm Scope, Mil-C Reticle – C623

NX8 2.5-20x50mm Scope, MOAR Reticle – C622

NX8 4-32x50mm Scope, Mil-C Reticle – C625

NX8 4-32x50mm Scope, MOAR Reticle – C624

Nightforce new NX8 riflescope scope 8X magnification light weight EuroOptic

The new Nightforce NX8 series combines durability and high optical performance with an 8X zoom range. Compact and light-weight, NX8 scopes offer both MOA and Mil-Radian reticles.

Product Tip from EdLongRange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink New Product, Optics 5 Comments »
June 11th, 2019

“Aim Small, Miss Small” with Decreasing Size Targets

Right Click and “Save as” to download printable PDF versions of target.

In the hit Hollywood movie “The Patriot”, the hero Benjamin Martin (played by Mel Gibson), tells his sons: “Aim small, miss small”. That advice was given to help his sons survive encounters with the British redcoats, but the “aim small, miss small” mantra can benefit target shooters as well.

We have found that novice and intermediate shooters can often improve their accuracy simply by using targets with smaller, more precise aiming points. Inexperienced shooters can benefit by starting with a large-size aiming circle, and then progressing to smaller and smaller target dots. This lets the shooter increase the challenge as his gun-handling becomes more steady and his aim improves.

Here are two rimfire training targets with “big to small” target circles. Start with the largest circles, then move to the smaller ones in sequence. This systematic drill provides increasing challenge shot-by-shot. Novices often are quite surprised to see their accuracy improve as they move from bigger to smaller aiming points. That provides positive feedback — always a good thing.

Right Click and “Save as” to download printable PDF versions of target.

Permalink Shooting Skills No Comments »