October 10th, 2019

How to Succeed at Club Matches — Six Tips

During shooting season, there are probably 400 or more club “fun matches” conducted around the country. One of the good things about these club shoots is that you don’t have to spend a fortune on equipment to have fun. But we’ve seen that many club shooters handicap themselves with a few common equipment oversights or lack of attention to detail while reloading. Here are SIX TIPS that can help you avoid these common mistakes, and build more accurate ammo for your club matches.

Benchrest rear bag1. Align Front Rest and Rear Bags. We see many shooters whose rear bag is angled left or right relative to the bore axis. This can happen when you rush your set-up. But even if you set the gun up carefully, the rear bag can twist due to recoil or the way your arm contacts the bag. After every shot, make sure your rear bag is aligned properly (this is especially important for bag squeezers who may actually pull the bag out of alignment as they squeeze).

Forum member ArtB adds: “To align my front rest and rear bag with the target, I use an old golf club shaft. I run it from my front rest stop through a line that crosses over my speed screw and into the slot between the two ears. I stand behind that set-up and make sure I see a straight line pointing at the target. I also tape a spot on the  golf shaft that indicates how far the back end of the rear bag should be placed from the front rest stop. If you don’t have a golf shaft, use a wood dowel.

2. Avoid Contact Interference. We see three common kinds of contact or mechanical interference that can really hurt accuracy. First, if your stock has front and/or rear sling swivels make sure these do NOT contact the front or rear bags at any point of the gun’s travel. When a sling swivel digs into the front bag that can cause a shot to pop high or low. To avoid this, reposition the rifle so the swivels don’t contact the bags or simply remove the swivels before your match. Second, watch out for the rear of the stock grip area. Make sure this is not resting on the bag as you fire and that it can’t come back to contact the bag during recoil. That lip or edge at the bottom of the grip can cause problems when it contacts the rear bag. Third, watch out for the stud or arm on the front rest that limits forward stock travel. With some rests this is high enough that it can actually contact the barrel. We encountered one shooter recently who was complaining about “vertical flyers” during his match. It turns out his barrel was actually hitting the front stop! With most front rests you can either lower the stop or twist the arm to the left or right so it won’t contact the barrel.

3. Weigh Your Charges — Every One. This may sound obvious, but many folks still rely on a powder measure. Yes we know that most short-range BR shooters throw their charges without weighing, but if you’re going to pre-load for a club match there is no reason NOT to weigh your charges. You may be surprised at how inconsistent your powder measure actually is. One of our testers was recently throwing H4198 charges from a Harrell’s measure for his 30BR. Each charge was then weighed twice with a Denver Instrument lab scale. Our tester found that thrown charges varied by up to 0.7 grains! And that’s with a premium measure.

4. Measure Your Loaded Ammo — After Bullet Seating. Even if you’ve checked your brass and bullets prior to assembling your ammo, we recommend that you weigh your loaded rounds and measure them from base of case to bullet ogive using a comparator. If you find a round that is “way off” in weight or more than .005″ off your intended base to ogive length, set it aside and use that round for a fouler. (Note: if the weight is off by more than 6 or 7 grains you may want to disassemble the round and check your powder charge.) With premium, pre-sorted bullets, we’ve found that we can keep 95% of loaded rounds within a range of .002″, measuring from base (of case) to ogive. Now, with some lots of bullets, you just can’t keep things within .002″, but you should still measure each loaded match round to ensure you don’t have some cases that are way too short or way too long.

Scope Ring5. Check Your Fasteners. Before a match you need to double-check your scope rings or iron sight mounts to ensure everything is tight. Likewise, you should check the tension on the screws/bolts that hold the action in place. Even on a low-recoiling rimfire rifle, action screws or scope rings can come loose during normal firing.

6. Make a Checklist and Pack the Night Before. Ever drive 50 miles to a match then discover you have the wrong ammo or that you forgot your bolt? Well, mistakes like that happen to the best of us. You can avoid these oversights (and reduce stress at matches) by making a checklist of all the stuff you need. Organize your firearms, range kit, ammo box, and shooting accessories the night before the match. And, like a good Boy Scout, “be prepared”. Bring a jacket and hat if it might be cold. If you have windflags, bring them (even if you’re not sure the rules allow them). Bring spare batteries, and it’s wise to bring a spare rifle and ammo for it. If you have just one gun, a simple mechanical breakdown (such as a broken firing pin) can ruin your whole weekend.

Permalink Competition, Reloading, Shooting Skills 6 Comments »
October 10th, 2019

Walmart Halts Sales of .223 Rem and Handgun Ammunition

Walmart ammo ammunition ban stop selling AR15 rifle shotgun

Walmart is yielding to anti-gun forces one step at a time. First the national retail chain stopped selling handguns in 1993. Next in 2015, Walmart stopped selling “black rifles” — AR-15 platform firearms. Then in 2018 Walmart raised the age for gun purchases from 18 to 21. And the latest restrictions involve ammunition. Walmart announced it would not longer sell ANY pistol ammunition. And Walmart now won’t sell .223 Rem (5.56×45) ammunition commonly used in ARs and “modern sporting rifles”. What comes next? If a criminal uses a shotgun in a multiple-death incident, will Walmart stop selling shotguns?

1993 — Walmart halts sales of all handguns.
2015 — Walmart halts sales of AR-15 type rifles.
2018 — Walmart raises minimum age for firearm purchase from 18 to 21 years.
2019 — Walmart halts sales of all pistol ammunition.
2019 — Walmart halts sales of all .223 Rem (5.56×45) ammunition.

Walmart Expands Its Anti-Gun Agenda

Article based on Report by Midsouth Shooters Blog

Walmart has been steadily rolling back its support of the Second Amendment since 1993 when it stopped the sale of all handguns in every state except Alaska. Then, in 2015 it ended the sale of AR-15 style MSR rifles, and any toy or airgun resembling any “military-style rifle used in mass shootings”. Last year, Walmart raised the minimum age for gun purchases from 18 to 21, two weeks after the Parkland, Florida school shooting. And Walmart rolled out another set of restrictions after the recent shooting at a Walmart Super Center in El Paso, Texas.

“Walmart may not sell the ammo you need, and more companies beholden to the pressure of the vocal minority may follow suit. Effectively, Walmart has been bullied into kowtowing to the social justice warriors, and woke-ninjas in the vocal minority.” — Midsouth Blog

In a memo to employees, Walmart CEO, Doug McMillon, stated: “After selling through our current inventory commitments, we will discontinue sales of short-barrel rifle ammunition such as the .223 caliber and 5.56 caliber that, while commonly used in some hunting rifles, can also be used in large capacity clips on military-style weapons.”

Walmart has also stated that it will no longer sell handgun ammo. McMillon previously said Walmart was responsible for 2% of firearm sales in the U.S. and 20% of ammunition sales. Walmart expects its share of ammunition sales to drop to between 6% and 9% as a result of the newly-announced changes. The company will continue to sell shotguns and rifles [But for how long? — Editor].

“In a complex situation lacking a simple solution, we are trying to take constructive steps to reduce the risk that events like these will happen again,” McMillon said in a memo. “The status quo is unacceptable.” In this 2015 video, McMillon explained the decision to stop selling AR-platform rifles.

Walmart ammo ammunition ban stop selling AR15 rifle shotgun

Changes to Walmart Gun Carry Policies
Another rider on the new Walmart policy affects customers who open-carry in their stores. If shoppers openly carry guns into Walmart stores going forward, store managers may ask the shopper to leave and safely secure their gun in their vehicle before returning to the store. “The policies will vary by location, however, and shoppers who are openly carrying guns may not always be asked to leave the store,” a Walmart spokesman said.

“As long as a Hornady is at Hornady, we will never sell direct to Walmart. They are no friend of the industry.” — Jason Hornady, 2007

Walmart CEO Calls for More Gun Control
“We encourage our nation’s leaders to move forward and strengthen background checks and to remove weapons from those who have been determined to pose an imminent danger,” McMillon said. “We do not sell military-style rifles, and we believe the re-authorization of the Assault Weapons Ban should be debated to determine its effectiveness.”

Commentary from Midsouth Shooters
Walmart may not sell the ammo you need, and more companies beholden to the pressure of the vocal minority may follow suit. Midsouth will continue to sell the ammunition and reloading supplies you need, regardless. Our Second Amendment right is a sacred right, and for you to protect your family with the tools available, you need access to fairly priced ammunition and firearms.

Midsouth Shooters supply

Midsouth Shooters was founded on the tenants of honesty, family, and fairness, rooted in American and God. For a company, or organization, to be swayed by knee-jerk reactions sets a precedent of allowing the mob to dictate overreaching policies which put many in harms way. Effectively, Walmart has been bullied into kowtowing to the social justice warriors, and woke-ninjas in the vocal minority.”

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 19 Comments »