October 23rd, 2019

Bullet Pointing 101 — How to Point Match Bullet Tips

Berger Bullet Pointing Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Whidden Pointing Die pointer

Tech Tip by Doc Beech, Applied Ballistics Support Team
I am going to hit on some key points when it comes to bullet pointing. How much pointing and trimming needed is going to depend on the bullet itself. Specifically how bad the bullets are to begin with. Starting out with better-quality projectiles such as Bergers is going to mean two things. First that you don’t need to do as much correction to the meplat, but also that the improvement is going to be less. NOTE: We recommend you DO NOT POINT hunting bullets. Pointing can affect terminal performance in a bad way.

NOTE the change in the bullet tip shape and hollowpoint size after pointing:
Berger Bullet Pointing Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Whidden Pointing Die pointer

Don’t Over-Point Your Bullets
What is important here is that you never want to over-point. It is far better to be safe, and under-point, rather than over-point and crush the tips even the slightest bit. To quote Bryan Litz exactly: “Best practice is to leave a tiny air gap in the tip so you’re sure not to compress the metal together which will result in crushing. Most of the gain in pointing is taking the bullet tip down to this point. Going a little further doesn’t show on target”. So in essence you are only bringing the tip down a small amount… and you want to make sure you leave an air gap at the tip.

Salazar Whidden Bullet Pointer system

Also keep in mind, bullet pointing is one of those procedures with variable returns. If you only shoot at 100-200 yards, bullet pointing will likely not benefit you. To see the benefits, which can run from 2 to 10% (possibly more with poorly designed bullets), you need be shooting at long range. Bryan says: “Typically, with pointing, you’ll see 3-4% increase in BC on average. If the nose is long and pointy (VLD shape) with a large meplat, that’s where pointing has the biggest effect; up to 8% or 10%. If the meplat is tight on a short tangent nose, the increase can be as small as 1 or 2%.” For example, If you point a Berger .308-caliber 185gr Juggernaut expect to only get a 2% increase in BC.

Berger Bullet Pointing Applied Ballistics Bryan Litz Whidden Pointing Die pointer

Should You Trim after Pointing?
Sometimes you can see tiny imperfections after pointing, but to say you “need” to trim after pointing is to say that the small imperfections make a difference. Bryan Litz advises: “If your goal is to make bullets that fly uniformly at the highest levels, it may not be necessary to trim them.” In fact Bryan states: “I’ve never trimmed a bullet tip, before or after pointing”. So in the end it is up to you to decide.

Pointing is Easy with the Right Tools
The process of pointing in itself is very simple. It takes about as much effort to point bullets as it does to seat bullets. We are simply making the air gap on the tip of the bullet ever-so smaller. Don’t rush the job — go slow. Use smooth and steady pressure on the press when pointing bullets. You don’t want to trap air in the die and damage the bullet tip. You can use most any press, with a caliber-specific sleeve and correct die insert. The Whidden pointing die has a micrometer top so making adjustments is very easy.

Bryan Litz actually helped design the Whidden Bullet Pointing Die System, so you can order the Pointing Die and Inserts directly from Applied Ballistics. Just make sure that you pick up the correct caliber sleeve(s) and appropriate insert(s). As sold by Applied Ballistics, the Whidden Bullet Pointing Die System comes with the die, one tipping insert, and one caliber-specific sleeve. To see which insert(s) you need for your bullet type(s), click this link:

LINK: Whidden Gunworks Pointing Die Insert Selection Chart

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading 5 Comments »
October 23rd, 2019

Hornady Offers Reloading App — Data $0.99 Per Cartridge Type

Hornady reloading handbook cartridge Mobile App Android IOS

The Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading is now available in Mobile App form. Hornady has released FREE Mobile Apps for Android and iOS (Apple) Mobile Devices. You get a lot of information for free. However, most of the actual load data is surcharged. You can buy all current load data for $19.99, or use the “à la carte” option to purchase load data for 99 cents each per cartridge type.

For example, if you wanted .223 Rem, .284 Win, .308 Win, you’d pay $2.97 (3 x $0.99). Frankly, we’d just use the FREE information available from the Hodgdon and Vihtavuori online Reloading Centers. But we understand some folks will prefer the convenience of an App with a wide variety of powder brands all in one place. Hornady’s full data collection covers hundreds of cartridges — .17 Hornet to 50 BMG (for rifle) and .22 Hornet to .500 S&W (for pistol). Folks say the App is easy to navigate and simple to use. For more information, visit Hornady.com/reloadingapp.


Download Hornady Android App | Download Hornady iOS App

What you get for free — Included with the FREE APP are hundreds of pages of reloading information including rifle and handgun bullet guides, the basics of reloading, tips and techniques plus limited free data on newer cartridge releases such as .224 Valkyrie, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 PRC, 300 PRC and more.

Hornady reloading handbook cartridge Mobile App Android IOS

The App features over 200 cartridge types with a variety of loads using Hornady bullets, including A-Tip Match, ELD Match and ELD-X. Velocity and powder charts are included with each cartridge for easy reference. The database includes popular established powders plus new powders such as Power Pro 2000 MR, IMR 4451 and 7977, CFE Pistol, BE-86, Reloder 23, 26, 33 and 50, Accurate LT-30 and 32. Popular powders such as Reloder 17, Superformance, and LeverEvolution® have also been expanded.

Included with the free download are hundreds of pages of reloading information, bullet guides, tips and techniques plus limited free data on recent offerings such as 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 PRC, and 300 PRC. Beyond that, reloaders must pay for load data on particular cartridges. Reloading data is available for download in three ways: Á la carte ($0.99 per cartridge type), Full Data Purchase for App ($19.99), or Annual Subscription ($19.99/year recurring).

Subscription Option — If you pay $19.99 per year you get full access to Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading 10th Edition data, plus new data developed for the 11th Edition, plus automatic updates. Subscribers will also get a printed edition of the Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading (11th Edition) when it is released in the fall of 2020.

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