December 12th, 2019

Berger Releases NEW 6.5mm 144gr LR Hybrid Target Bullet

New berger 109 grain hybrid bullet LRHT long range hybrid target

A hot new 6.5mm match bullet has arrived — the Berger 144-grain Hybrid. This new 144-grainer, officially called the Long Range Hybrid Target (LRHT), features a formed meplat (bullet tip) for more consistent Ballistic Coefficient (BC). With its new MRT (Meplat Reduction Technology) nose, the new 144gr LRHT boasts a high-BC, “jump-tolerant” hybrid ogive profile along with an extremely consistent BC. In fact, Doppler Radar testing confirms less than 1% BC variation from bullet to bullet. While a high BC is of course desirable for competitive shooting, shot-to-shot BC consistency is most critical when engaging targets to 600 yards and beyond. The 144’s BC numbers are very impressive for a 6.5mm bullet: 0.655 G1 and 0.336 G7.

New berger 109 grain hybrid bullet LRHT long range hybrid target

AccurateShooter.com plans to test these new 144s very soon — we’ve sent some to championship-level shooters. The new 144s should prove very popular. These bullets are optimized for leading accuracy and long-range cartridges such as 6.5mm Creedmoor, 6.5×47 Lapua, Remington .260, 6.5-284, and 6.5 PRC among others. NOTE: Berger states that the new 144gr LRHT offers the same stability factor as Berger’s 140gr Hybrid Target. Accordingly, the new 144-grainer can be considered a “direct replacement” for the proven Berger 140gr Hybrids. And YES, the 144gr LRHT will work in 1:8″-twist barrels.

“The 6.5mm 144 Grain LRHTs offer several advantages”, said Bryan Litz, Berger’s Chief Ballistician. “The ultra-sleek profile provides a higher Ballistic Coefficient (BC) resulting in less wind drift at all ranges. The proprietary MRT manufacturing process also provides a higher and more consistent BC, important for reducing dispersion at long range.”

“During our initial Doppler Radar testing we concluded that the new 6.5mm 144gr Long Range Hybrid Target bullets consistently displayed ballistic coefficients with standard deviations far less than one percent of the documented average” reports Garett Stoddard, Berger Engineer. “Driven at muzzle velocities typical for today’s popular 6.5mm cartridges, that variation translates to only a 2″ vertical group dispersion at 1000 yards. [This demonstrates] the advantage of the Meplat Reduction Technology, as well as the importance of ballistic coefficient consistency.”

The new 6.5mm 144 Grain Long Range Hybrid Target is the latest offering in Berger’s impressive Long Range Hybrid Target (LRHT) product line, which also includes .224-Cal and 6mm projectiles:

New berger 109 grain hybrid bullet LRHT long range hybrid target

Meplat Reduction Technology for More Consistent BCs
Berger’s new 6.5mm 144gr Long Range Hybrid Target is designed to provide Benchrest, F-Class, and PRS enthusiasts a class-leading level of precision and consistency. Utilizing advanced/proprietary manufacturing processes, Berger’s Meplat Reduction Technology™ (MRT™) System applies controlled pressure along the projectile nose, producing a homogeneous and repeatable bullet profile. This yields what Berger claims are “the industry’s most consistent Ballistic Coefficients (BC)”.

The Berger 6.5mm 144 Grain Long Range Hybrid Target™ Bullets will be available very soon at authorized Berger Retailers. Use the Berger Dealer Locator to find a store near you.

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December 12th, 2019

Stainless Steel & Corrosion Resistance — What You Need to Know

Benchmark stainless steel barrel barrels match
Most modern match rifle barrels are stainless steel alloy. These are from Benchmark Barrels.

Though some grades of stainless are more corrosion-resistent, ALL varieties of stainless steel can rust if they are not handled and stored properly.

Some folks feel that they don’t have to worry about rust and corrosion on stainless steel barrels, actions, and other components. That’s not really true. “Stainless” is a bit of a misnomer. First, there are different types of stainless steel alloys, with different degrees of rust resistance. 300 series stainless is more corrosion resistant than the 416 stainless commonly used in barrels. The composition (by percentage weight) of 416 stainless is 0.15% carbon, 12-14% chromium and the rest iron. 416 stainless steel lacks the roughly 10% nickel content that makes the 300 series more corrosion resistant in atmospheric conditions. But because 416 handles pressure better and is easier to machine (than 300 series steel), 416 stainless remains the better choice for barrels.

stainless steel barrel Techshooter

Though some grades of stainless are more corrosion-resistent, ALL varieties of stainless steel can rust if they are not handled and stored properly. Forum reader Kells81 observed: “Wanna see some rusted stainless? Go to the big “C” brand store in Ft. Worth. Every stainless gun they have on the used gun rack is rusted.” Tom Easly of TRE Custom explains: “Sweat is very corrosive. Sweat and blood will rust many stainless steels. I hate to handle my guns or drip on them when I sweat. It really helps to just wipe them good with a wet rag, dry and wipe on a light coating of gun oil. I think most stainless barrels are made from type 416 stainless, and it is generally pretty corrosion resistant, but not when exposed to sweat, blood, or chlorates (corrosive priming), and some other electrolytes.”

Forum member Jacob, who is studying materials science at LSU, provides this technical information: “The basic resistance of stainless steel occurs because of its ability to form a protective coating on the metal surface. This coating is a ‘passive’ film which resists further ‘oxidation’ or rusting. The formation of this film is instantaneous in an oxidizing atmosphere such as air, water, or other fluids that contain oxygen. Once the layer has formed, we say that the metal has become ‘passivated’ and the oxidation or ‘rusting’ rate will slow down to less than 0.002″ per year (0.05 mm per year).

Unlike aluminum or silver, this passive film is invisible in stainless steel. It’s created when oxygen combines with the chrome in the stainless to form chrome oxide which is more commonly called ‘ceramic’. This protective oxide or ceramic coating is common to most corrosion resistant materials.

Halogen salts, especially chlorides, easily penetrate this passive film and will allow corrosive attack to occur. The halogens are easy to recognize because they end in the letters ‘ine’. Listed in order of their activity they are: fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, astatine.

These are the same chemicals that will penetrate Teflon and cause trouble with Teflon coated or encapsulated o-rings and/ or similar coated materials. Chlorides are one of the most common elements in nature and if that isn’t bad enough, they’re also soluble, active ions. These provide the basis for electrolytes. The presence of electrolytic solutions can accelerate corrosion or chemical attack.”

CONCLUSION: Stainless steel barrels and components won’t rust nearly as fast as blued steel, but you still have to take precautions — particularly removing sweat and corrosive salts from the barrel. Also, don’t let moisture build up inside or outside of the barrel. We recommend wiping your barrels and actions with Eezox, or Corrosion-X after each use. These are both extremely effective rust-fighters that go on thin, without leaving a greasy residue. (Eezox leaves a clear finish, while Corrosion-X has a slightly waxy finish.) Also store your guns in Bore-Store bags when the guns go in the safe. Bore-Stores wick away moisture, and the synthetic fleece inner surface is treated with rust-fighting chemicals. Bore-Stores also protect your guns against dings and scratches.

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