January 8th, 2020

New-for-2020 Handguns — SHOT Show Pick Six Preview

new 2020 shot show pistol handgun revolver wheelgun colt python kimber korth Smith wesson

When covering SHOT Show 2020 our reporters will focus primarily on rifles, optics, and reloading equipment, because this website is dedicated to rifle accuracy. However we know many of our readers are interested in semi-auto pistols and revolvers, and we bet the majority of our Forum members own handguns. This Editor has competed in various pistol disciplines and I still love my semi-autos and wheelguns. So, for you fellow pistoleros out there, here’s our “Pick Six” — a half-dozen new handguns (both semi-auto pistols and revolvers) — all new for 2020.

1. Korth (Nighthawk Custom) — Korth Ranger

nighthawk custom Korth Ranger .357 Magnum Germany wheelgun pistol handgun

The new German-made Korth Ranger revolver is one of the most impressive wheelguns you can buy — at any price. Sold in the USA by Nighthawk Custom, Korth revolvers feature best-in-the-world workmanship, superb triggers, and outstanding accuracy. Designed for revolver match shooting, the Korth Ranger features a top Picatinny rail for Red Dot optics. The barrel shroud has lightening cuts which reveal a Lothar Walther match barrel with target crown.

2. Ruger 57 — New Competition Pistol for 5.7×28 Cartridge

new ruger high-velocity 5.7x28 mm FNH pistol handgun

The all-new Ruger 57 is an impressive full-size pistol with 4.94″ barrel. This looks like it will be a hoot to shoot. The 5.7×28 cartridge is a high-velocity, low recoil round — sort of a 22 WMR on steroids. Expect to get close to 1700 fps from a 40gr cartridge. We expect this long-slide pistol will be used mostly for gun games, but with a 20-round magazine, it certainly can handle self-defense duties too. According to a recent VIDEO REVIEW by 22Plinkster, the new Ruger 57 performs well. READ Ruger 57 Field Test.

3. Colt Python for 2020 — Stainless with 4.25″ or 6″ Barrels

New Colt Python stainless steel revolver wheelgun .357 Magnum dirty harry
The 4.25″ barrel Python is 9.75″ long and 42 ounces. The 6″ model is 11.5″ long and 46 ounces.

The Snake is back baby! For 2020, Colt’s Manufacturing Co. LLC will offer a refined and upgraded Colt Python with a hefty $1499.00 MSRP. The legendary double-action revolver, which originally debuted in 1955, returns in stainless steel in 4.25″ and 6″ barrel lengths. It is designed to be stronger than before. Numerous improvements were made to reinforce the revolver, including the use of stronger stainless steel alloys and a re-designed rear sight which allows for a 30% increase in the cross-sectional area of the top strap — meaning more steel for a stronger revolver.

4. Keltec P17 — New Compact, Budget-Priced .22 LR Pistol

Keltec p17 .22 LR 22LR rimfire pistol handgun

Keltec’s new P17 rimfire pistol is lightweight, easy to handle, and features a fiber optic front sight and an adjustable rear. Priced at just $199.95 MSRP, the .22 LR P17 has 16+1 round capacity and ships with three, 16-round magazines. This is a small pistol — it weight just 14 ounces and OAL is 6.65″. Keltec states: “The new, affordable P17 pistol makes range days a lot less expensive and far more fun.” With low cost .22 LR ammo and a 16+1 capacity, this should be fun to shoot.

5. Ruger Super GP100 Revolver in 9mm Luger (9x19mm)

Ruger 9mm 9x19mm luger Revolver GP100 Super GP 100 competition pistol

The 9×19mm Parabellum (aka 9mm Luger) cartridge was introduced in 1902 by German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for the Luger semi-auto pistol. Now 118 years later, Ruger is bringing us a sturdy, 6″-barrel revolver for this popular cartridge. Ruger adapted its existing Super Redhawk frame for this Super GP100 9mm revolver, which features a rather short 8-round PVD-coated cylinder to better fit the 9x19mm round. According to Guns.com the 9mm GP100 “uses a cylinder and extractor cut for moon clips to speed up reloading [and] sports a 6-inch half-lug sleeved and shrouded barrel with an 11-degree target crown[.]”

6. Wilson Combat — Experior Series 1911 Pistols

Wilson Combat’s new Experior handguns feature match-grade components, sweet triggers, and accuracy guarantees. Wilson states that “The Experior lineup [is] the most fully-loaded package we offer, showcasing nearly every tactical, functional and cosmetic option as a standard feature. They are a unique blend of classic 1911 design, paired with modern-day reliability and ergonomic enhancements[.]” Experiors will be offered in both 9mm and .45 ACP in a variety of barrel lengths. There will be both single-stack and double-stack Experior models.

MORE HANDGUNS HERE: You’ll find 18 other new-for-2020 pistols featured on the Guns Holsters & Gear (GHG), Shot Show 2020 Preview Page

BONUS — Upgraded for 2020
Smith & Wesson M&P M2.0 C.O.R.E. Pro Series Pistols

Smith & Wesson M&P 2.0 pistols were introduced back in 2017, so they aren’t new. But for 2020, S&W is offering Performance Center variants with cool new features. The New M&P M2.0 Performance Center pistols include porting and Competition Optics Ready (C.O.R.E.) slides. Chambered in 9mm and .40 S&W, the new Performance Center M&P M2.0 pistols are available with either a 4.25″ or 5″ barrel. Features may include ported barrels and slides and fiber optic sights. For those looking to mount an optic without custom work, the new C.O.R.E. pistols have slides cut for optics straight from the factory. These will support the majority of popular pistol reflex sights.

Smith Wesson Performance center M&P M2.0 competition

Permalink - Articles, Gear Review, Handguns, New Product No Comments »
January 8th, 2020

Primer Pocket Rocket — Another Reason to Use Eye Protection

Primer Blown Gas defect winchester casehead

A few years back, Our friend Grant Guess had a “close encounter” with a bad primer. An apparently defective primer caused part of the casehead on one of his rounds to blow out. This, in turn, allowed high pressure gas to vent through the damaged primer pocket. Take a good look, boys and girls. This is yet another very good reason to wear safety glasses. The cartridge was a 6.5-06, handloaded in necked-down Winchester-headstamp .270 Win brass. Grant reports:

“I had a blow through between the primer and the primer pocket today. The action was really smoking and I got a face full of gas. This was a reasonably light charge. Thank God for safety glasses.

I should also mention that it appears there is a 3/64 hole that is halfway between the primer and the primer pocket. Like it burned a small jet hole through both of them.”

Could this happen to you? It just might. On seeing this damaged case, one of Grant’s Facebook friends, Chris D., observed: “Search the internet, you will see a lot of these pin hole ‘in the corner’ failures. Obviously Winchester has some issues with the LR primers.”

Careful Examination Reveals Apparent Primer Defect
After this incident, Grant examined the damaged case: “I pinned the flash hole and it is not over-sized or under-sized. The primer clearly has an area where it had a defect. At [50,000 CUP], it doesn’t take much of a defect to cause issues. There was a slight bit of pucker-factor on the next shot….”

Primer Blown Gas defect winchester casehead

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tech Tip 8 Comments »
January 8th, 2020

Dollars and $ense — Bargain 9mm Ammo Vs. Handloading

Sig Sauer P210 Legend

Everyone should have a 9mm Luger (9x19mm) pistol. The 9mm Luger round feeds/cycles great, recoil is moderate, and a vast array of excellent 9mm handguns are available. And, perhaps most importantly, quality factory ammo is affordable. In fact because 9x19mm ammo is produced in such quantity, it is some of the cheapest centerfire pistol ammo you can buy. Today we’ve found some great 9mm Luger ammo deals for you, with big-name factory stuff for under 18 cents per round.

At that price, it may not be worth reloading. Consider this — typical 9mm component costs easily approach fifteen cents per round even with free brass: Bullet ($0.08 – $0.10), Powder ($0.02), and Primer ($0.04). Given the costs of bullets, powder, and primers, it may not be worth reloading 9mm Luger, especially if you value your precious time!

HK H&K Heckler Koch P7 PSP P7M8 9mm Luger pistol

Should You Reload 9mm Ammo? Run the Numbers, Then Decide…
While this Editor reloads almost all his .45 ACP and .44 Magnum ammo, I generally shoot factory ammo in my 9mm Luger pistols. Why? When you give some reasonable value to the time you spend setting-up and operating your reloading press, it is hard to beat factory ammo at around $10 per 50-count box (i.e. $0.20/round). While once-fired 9mm brass is plentiful (and cheap), you can easily spend 15-16 cents per round just on bullet, powder, and primer. So reloading may only save you 4 or 5 cents per round. Hence if you load 200 rounds per hour (including set-up time), you only recoup $8 to $10 per hour (at best) for all your effort. You may decide, as I did, that my time was worth more than that.

Great Deals on 9mm Luger (9x19mm) Factory Ammunition

Sellier & Bellot 115gr FMJ at Brownells
$186.99 for 1000-rd Case
$15 OFF $125.00 with CODE M9D
Net Cost: $171.99 for 1000 rounds

9mm 9x19mm factory ammo deal sale bargain

Browning 9mm 115gr FMJ at Grafs.com
$10.99 per 50-rd box ($0.22/rd)
Flat Rate Shipping $7.95

9mm 9x19mm factory ammo deal sale bargain

Fiocchi 9mm 115gr FMJ at Natchez
$9.79 per 50-rd box ($0.20/rd)
Shipping Extra

9mm 9x19mm factory ammo deal sale bargain

CCI Blazer 9mm 115gr at Midsouth
$9.08 per 50-rd box ($0.18/rd)
Shipping Extra

9mm 9x19mm factory ammo deal sale bargain

Pistolet levedev Russian 9mm

HK H&K Heckler Koch P7 PSP P7M8 9mm Luger pistol

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip 1 Comment »