January 9th, 2020

New Wind-Mapping Technology in Trijicon Ventus Rangefinder

Ventus X collimated laser rangefinder wind reading Ballistics app LIDAR Doppler

To be honest, when we read the description of Trijicon’s new Ventus device, we thought it sounded like science fiction. This quad-collimated laser rangefinder/wind-reading gizmo seems like something Captain Kirk would use on Star Trek. According to Trijicon, the Ventus is “the world’s first advanced wind-mapping and range-detecting handheld device.” That’s right folks, this is a rangefinder that also “measures three-dimensional wind velocities at multiple distances out to 500 yards”. Combined with a claimed 5000-yard ranging ability (on reflective objects), Trijicon says its new Ventus gives “shooters and hunters previously unattainable data about their environment for long-range accuracy.”

The Ventus unit is designed with a Doppler LIDAR engine that can measure headwind, tailwind, crosswind and vertical wind components at six different distances, in any weather condition. The higher-end Ventus X Model also includes an onboard ballistics solver which communicates, via Bluetooth, with the Trijicon Ballistics App. This allows Ventus-X users to store shooter and target geographic locations, calculate ballistic solutions, and display wind maps.

Ventus X collimated laser rangefinder wind reading Ballistics app LIDAR Doppler
The Ventus utilizes an advanced Doppler LIDAR engine and four collimated lasers sent out in a cone to measure wavelength interaction with dust particles at up to six different distances.

Four Collimated Lasers Read the Wind via Doppler LIDAR
How does the wind-reading work? Trijicon states: “Thanks to a fiber optic collimated laser capable of returns through dust, fog, sleet, and snow, the Ventus offers extreme, all-weather performance. Four collimated lasers [are] sent out in a cone to measure wavelength interaction with dust particles at up to six different distances. This technology allows the Ventus to calculate for head, tail, cross and vertical wind, giving shooters an incredibly accurate wind reading.”

Ventus X collimated laser rangefinder wind reading Ballistics app LIDAR Doppler

Ventus X Model Includes Advanced Ballistics Solver
The Ventus comes in two models: Ventus and Ventus X. The basic Ventus handles ranging duties. The upgraded Ventus X adds a state-of-the-art, onboard ballistics solver. An onboard sensor suite captures all necessary data — range, wind, atmospheric temperature, stratospheric pressure, and incline angle — to provide a very advanced ballistic solution.

Ventus X collimated laser rangefinder wind reading Ballistics app LIDAR Doppler

The Ventus X also communicates via Bluetooth to the advanced Trijicon Ballistic application, soon to be available for both iOS and Android. The Ballistic App stores shooter and target geographic locations, provides a ballistic solution, and displays a wind map overlay of readings.

DISCUSS HERE in our Shooters’ Forum Ventus Thread »

Price and Availability
Trijicon says both Ventus and Ventus X units should be available in the “Second Half of 2020″. MSRP unknown at this time.

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January 9th, 2020

GUN INFO 101 — Headspace Defined and Illustrated

Ultimate Reloader Brownells headspacing go gage gauge barrel gunsmithing
This illustration shows headspace measurement for the popular .308 Winchester cartridge, which headspaces on the shoulder. Image copyright 2015 Ultimate Reloader.

In this Brownells Tech Tip, Brownells gun tech Steve Ostrem explains what headspace is and why it’s one of the most critical measurements for nearly all firearms. Even if you’re an experienced rifle shooter, it’s worth watching this video to refresh your understanding of headspace measurements, and the correct use of “GO” and “NO-GO” gauges.

Headspace Definition
In firearms, headspace is the distance measured from the part of the chamber that stops forward motion of the cartridge (the datum reference) to the face of the bolt. Used as a verb, headspace refers to the interference created between this part of the chamber and the feature of the cartridge that achieves the correct positioning. Different cartridges have their datum lines in different positions in relation to the cartridge. For example, 5.56x45mm NATO ammunition headspaces off the shoulder of the cartridge, whereas .303 British headspaces off the forward rim of the cartridge.

If the headspace is too short, ammunition that is in specification may not chamber correctly. If headspace is too large, the ammunition may not fit as intended or designed and the cartridge case may rupture, possibly damaging the firearm and injuring the shooter. (Source: Wikipedia)

Forster Headspace diagram belted magnum rimfire

Go gauge gage NOGO no-go field gaugesHeadspace Gauges
Headspace is measured with a set of two headspace gauges: a “Go” gauge, and a “No-Go” gauge. Headspace gauges resemble the cartridges for the chambers they are designed to headspace, and are typically made of heat-treated tool steel. Both a “Go” and a “No-Go” gauge are required for a gunsmith to headspace a firearm properly. A third gauge, the “Field” gauge, is used (as the name implies) in the field to indicate the absolute maximum safe headspace. This gauge is used because, over time, the bolt and receiver will wear, the bolt and lugs compress, and the receiver may stretch, all causing the headspace to gradually increase from the “factory specs” measured by the “Go” and “No-Go” gauges. A bolt that closes on “No-Go” but not on “Field” is close to being unsafe to fire, and may malfunction on cartridges that are slightly out of spec. (Source: Wikipedia)

To learn more, read Brownell’s longer article Headspace Gauges and How to Use Them. Among other things, this explains the relative lengths of “Go”, “No-Go”, and “Field” gauges. The “Field” is actually the longest: “The GO gauge corresponds to the SAAMI (Sporting Arms & Ammunition Manufacturer’s Institute) minimum chamber length, while the FIELD gauge usually matches the maximum chamber depth, or slightly less. NO-GO gauges are an intermediate length between minimum and maximum, that, technically, is a voluntary dimension. A firearm that closes on a NO-GO gauge and does not close on a FIELD gauge may not give good accuracy and may have very short cartridge case life from the ammunition re-loader’s standpoint.”

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January 9th, 2020

Comfortable, Low-Profile 27dB NRR Muffs for $6.99

ear muff earmuff 27 nrr db kryptek highlander passive deal $6.99
Note: You get one set of muffs (either gray or camo, NOT both) for $6.99 plus S/H.

Good muffs that offer 27 db Noise Reduction and won’t spoil your cheekweld — for under seven bucks? Can’t argue with that. Right now CDNN is offering a killer deal on Kryptek Sound Soldier 27 NRR muffs that sell elsewhere for around $21.00. Get these in Highlander Camo or Typhon Grey for just $6.99. That’s right, comfortable 27 NRR muffs for seven bucks a set.

These passive muffs have low profile shells engineered to stay out of the way when shouldering your weapon. The ergonomic headband keeps the muffs aligned, in their proper position. Purchasers report the soft leatherette ear seals are surprisingly comfortable. These muffs provide a pretty high NRR considering the low profile design. And the price, just $6.99 on sale, is hard to beat! NOTE: Other vendors have a more conservative 25 NRR for these type of muffs. That’s still quite good.

These affordable Kryptec Muffs are a good “back-up” item to keep in your vehicle or in your range kit. Though there are certainly higher-quality muffs, these Kryptecs function adequately for most shooting and hunting purposes. However, for maximum hearing protection, we do recommend running quality ear-plugs UNDER the muffs for double protection. Some government studies suggest that properly inserted ear plugs under muffs can improve the effective NRR by 3 dB. The top-rated plugs have a 32 dB NRR by themselves.


Why You Should Always Protect Your Hearing

“Science tells us that exposure to continuous noise of 85 dB for eight hours is enough to cause permanent hearing loss, and worse, spikes of 130 dB and more can result in permanent hearing damage instantly.”
Source: NRA Blog.

The Risk of Hearing Loss
Hearing loss can be progressive and irreversible. If you are a shooter, this is serious business. As the NRA Blog cautions: “You may not even realize you’re harming your hearing. Hearing loss occurs gradually, and can go effectively unnoticed until symptoms become severe. By then, the damage is done.”

Nobody wants to go deaf. But we often see shooters without effective hearing protection when they are walking around a few yards behind the firing line. That’s bad — even if you are away from the firing line, gunshot noises can damage your hearing. You MUST use effective hearing protection every time you go to the range. Good foam earplugs costs mere pennies but they can prevent deafness in your later years. Many folks also wear muffs over plugs.

Sound Levels for Common Noises:

9mm Luger pistol: 160 dB

Jet aircraft engine (near): 140 dB

.22 LR pistol: 134 dB

Normal human pain threshold: 120 dB

Noisy Nightclub: 110 db

Riding Motorcycle at 65 mph: 103 db

Power Lawnmower: 95 dB

Hearing damage possible: 85 dB (sustained for 8+ hours)

Ringing Telephone: 80 dB

Normal conversation: 60 dB

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