June 11th, 2020

James Mock Reviews Sightron SVSS ED 10-50x60mm Scope

sightron SVSS ED low disperions 10x-50x 10-50x60mm 34mm zero stop long range scope MOA-H reticle

Sightron’s Latest and Greatest Long Range Scope
Field Test and Review by James Mock
When I was writing for Precision Shooting Magazine I appreciated those vendors who would trust me to test their products. One such person was Alan Orr of Sightron. Alan was willing to send his scopes to me for testing and I found them to be some of the best values. I have shot Sightron’s SII 36X BR, the Sightron SIII 10-50x60mm Long Range (30mm tube). Recently I tested latest and greatest (in my opinion) high-magnification Sightron — the SVSS ED 10-50x60mm with MOA-H reticle. This unit boasts ED Glass and has a fat 34mm main tube.

Sightron’s SIII 10-50x60mm riflescope (30mm tube) is a fine value at $1050-$1190 street price. That popular 10X-50X LR optic (PHOTO HERE) delivers great performance for the price. However, long range shooters wanted more and Sightron has delivered with the new-generation SVSS ED 10-50x60mm ZS MOA-H optic (34mm tube). This impressive new scope features higher-grade ED (Extra Low-Dispersion) glass and many great features. These features include illuminated reticle, zero stop, and FAST parallax adjustments with coarse and fine adjustments. Also, there is a locking windage turret for the models NOT fitted with zero stop. I tested the Zero-Stop (ZS) version.

sightron SVSS ED low disperions 10x-50x 10-50x60mm 34mm zero stop long range scope MOA-H reticle

This new scope has exactly what I look for in a scope since most of my shooting is at 600 yards. This boasts Sightron’s proprietary “Exact Track” and a 7-layer lens coatings. One feature that is drawing rave reviews is the new parallax side focus control. This employs BOTH a coarse and a fine adjustment, as found on premium spotting scopes. This seems like a minor point, but it allows one to fine-tune the parallax with little effort. This, along with the fast-focus eye piece, enables one to get a crystal clear and sharp image quickly. The 1/8 MOA clicks are positive and the clicks are very audible.

Review in a Nutshell — This scope is amazing and I have used some of the best scopes to be found. It is as good or better than some scopes costing $1200-$1500 more. What does a Sightron 10-50X SVSS ED cost? If you shop around aggressively you can find the basic (non-illuminated) version for under $2000 (See footnote*). I know that seems like a lot of money and it is, but this product represents true value, as it performs with scopes costing $1000 more.

With its large 60mm objective lens with ED glass and the 7-layer coating, this scope has the brightest image of any that I have tested at high power settings. (Of course there are premium scopes that I have not yet tested that may equal or exceed this one.) A person must choose a scope best suited for the type of shooting planned. For long range benchrest competition, I don’t think that there are many optics that exceed the quality of this riflescope (especially for the cost).

sightron SVSS ED low disperions 10x-50x 10-50x60mm 34mm zero stop long range scope MOA-H reticle

The test scope has 1/8 MOA adjustments and illuminated MOA-H reticle. The MOA-H has hash marks that subtend 2 MOA at 24X; therefore the hash marks are 1 MOA apart at 48X. Since this scope is so bright and clear, I tend to leave it at 48X for most of my shooting. During very bright conditions, the depth of field can be increased with an aperture ring that can be purchased from Sightron. The illuminated reticle has 11 brightness settings. The above picture displays a high brightness level. Personally, I don’t envision using illumination during my shooting sessions.

This reticle is a little “busy” for many shooters who use the scope at close range. But for longer range, it seems ideal for my old eyes. If you wish, you can order a 10-50X SVSS ED with a 1/10th-MOA target dot reticle, non-illuminated. You’ll save money with that more basic version, model #27008.

sightron SVSS ED low disperions 10x-50x 10-50x60mm 34mm zero stop long range scope MOA-H reticle

Competing with New Sightron Scope at 300 Yards
I shot the scope in its maiden match at 300 yards. Spotting my 6mm bullet holes was easy, even in Louisiana’s famous mirage. I shot the entire match at 48X. The scope tracked perfectly during the match and the 1/8 MOA adjustments were spot on. At this 48X power, the MOA hash marks serve as a great aid in determining how far one needs to adjust his aim. The set-up for the match is shown in the photo above. The scope performed excellent even in tough conditions — it was hot, windy, and mirage was very bad. Today really tested my ability to battle the conditions with this new scope. The sun was bright; the ground was wet; and the wind was blowing; and it was hot. I shot the four score targets with a 49/50, a 50/50, another 49, and finished with a 48.

What Things Could Be Better
What, if anything, are things I dislike about this scope? Most reviews that I have seen object to the 42-ounce weight, but with my benchrest rifle, this is not a problem for me. Another complaint that I have seen is the indicator line for the elevation turret. This scope has a Zero Stop and that stop obscures the indicator line. I added a line with a pencil and the problem is solved.

Tester Was So Impressed He Bought this Sightron SVSS ED

I have tested many premium scopes in the past and have chosen to purchase two of them after testing. This is one of the two I bought. If you are in the market for a $2000-$2500 (street price) scope that will compare favorably with $3500 scopes, this may be the one for you.

This is a quality scope in every way and there are few things with which to find fault. The reticle seems too busy for me, but many long range shooters use the tree-shaped series of dots that are 1 MOA apart at 48X and 2 MOA at 24X. Part of my problem is 76-year-old eyes that need cataract surgery. One cannot fault a scope for this problem.

I can recommend this scope for the long range shooter without reservation. If your type of shooting can tolerate the weight and the cost, I believe that you will find this scope to your liking. Good shooting — James Mock

Here is a European video review of the Sightron SVSS 10-50x60mm with ED Glass:

sightron SVSS ED low disperions 10x-50x 10-50x60mm 34mm zero stop long range scope MOA-H reticle


* There are TWO different Sightron SVSS 10-60X scopes. The basic model (#27008), non-illuminated without Zero Stop, can be found for under $2000, but typically retails for around $2300. As tested in this review, the Zero Stop Model with illuminated MOA-H Reticle (#27011) is about $2450 street price.

Permalink Gear Review, New Product, Optics 1 Comment »
June 11th, 2020

Bet You Ain’t Seen This Before — Barrel-Indexing Rimfire Action

Bill Myers Indexing Action

The late Bill Myers was recognized as one of greatest rimfire gunsmiths who ever lived. Myers crafted many match-winning, record-setting rimfire benchrest rigs. Here we feature one of Bill’s most interesting creations — a clamping action that allows a rimfire barrel to be indexed (rotated) around the bore axis.

Bill was a creative thinker, and his own exhaustive testing has convinced him that barrel indexing can enhance accuracy in rimfire benchrest guns. Myers did acknowledge that, particularly with a very good barrel, the advantages of indexing may be subtle, and extensive testing may be required. Nonetheless, Myers believed that indexing could improve rimfire accuracy.

Indexing with the Myers’ Clamping Action
To index the barrel, Myers simply loosens the three clamping-bolts and rotates the barrel in the action. Because there is no thread to pull the barrel in or out, the headspace stays the same no matter how much the barrel is rotated. In other words you can rotate the barrel to any position on the clockface and the headspace remains unchanged.

Bill Myers Indexing Action
Bill Myers Indexing Action

The Challenge of Barrel Indexing
cone breech bill myers rimfire indexable actionWith a conventional barrel installation, employing a shoulder with a threaded tenon, it is difficult to index the barrel. Even with a cone breech (photo right) that eliminates the problem of extractor cuts, you’d have to use shims to alter the barrel index position, or otherwise re-set the shoulder each time you screwed the barrel in further.

Clamping Action Allows Barrel to Be Rotated to Any Position
Bill has come up with a masterful solution to barrel indexing. He designed and built his own prototype custom action that clamps the barrel rather than holding it with threads. The front section of the action is sliced lengthways, and then clamped down with three bolts. A special bushing (the gold-color piece in photos) fits between the barrel and the action. By using bushings of different inside diameters, Bill can fit any barrel up to an inch or so diameter, so long as it has a straight contour at the breech end. To mount the barrel, Bill simply places the fitted bushing over the barrel end-shank, then slips the “sleeved” barrel into the front end of the action. Tighten three bolts, and the barrel is secure.

Bill Myers Indexing Action

Permalink - Articles, Gunsmithing, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
June 11th, 2020

Smart Advice on Shipping Gun Parts and Firearms Accessories

Shipping information news Fedex UPS USPS postal service

shipping gun parts UPS FEDEXGun guys are always shipping stuff around the country — whether it’s a barrel to be chambered, or a scope that needs to go back for warranty repair. Or maybe you’ve sold some bullets or reloading dies you no longer need. To ensure your precious packages get to their destination in one piece, it’s important to take precautions when boxing up your items. And by all means insure packages for full value — even if your packaging is perfect, there is always the possibility that your shipment might be lost altogether. Sadly, that can happen, no matter which carrier you choose: Fedex, UPS, or the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). Here are some tips for shipping gun stuff — we explain how to pack items properly and how to minimize the risk of loss.

Tips for Shippers
Dennis Haffner from McGowen Precision Barrels offers some advice on how to avoid damage when shipping gun parts or other valuable or heavy items. Dennis explains:

shipping gun parts UPS FEDEX“First, I started double-packing the contents and in many cases double-boxing. I spend a fortune on heavy-reinforced shipping tape. If the contents are loosely packed, the package is going to get crushed. On real important items or delicate items, wrap the content in plastic and spray the inside void areas with non-expanding foam. They make shipping foam just for this. This method really works. Since I started paying more attention to packaging, I have just about wiped out my issues with all three companies (Fedex, UPS, USPS). Yes, I hate doing it, but in the long run for us, it’s cheaper.

Bullet shipments are the worst — a shipment of 500+ bullets can destroy a cardboard box. I have ordered bullets from individuals who put them in baggies and filled the remainder of the box with foam peanuts. That is not going to work. Any piece of metal, including a die, will puncture a cardboard box, or destroy a padded envelope. Just look at the tracking information and imagine your package bouncing around in the back of the shipping truck, probably under many other packages. My advice is to NEVER use padded envelopes. Barrel nuts or recoil lugs will most likely never make it.

ORM-D items are required to be shipped in heavily-reinforced, double-walled containers. The packages still get a little damage, but the contents usually survive.

shipping gun parts UPS FEDEXHow do shipments get damaged? Consider this — one of the shipping companies this year flipped (overturned) one of our new CNC machines (which rendered it useless). Maybe your small packages were in the same delivery truck as my CNC machine. I wonder how many little boxes were crushed underneath it.

As for USPS flat rate boxes — you would not believe what people try to stuff in these boxes. USPS finally put a weight limit on the boxes — they had to. I sometimes take my delicate items packed in an envelope or small box. I spray foam in a larger flat rate box and insert the smaller package, then fill the remainder of the void with foam. It works, and part usually arrives undamaged.”

shipping gun parts UPS FEDEX
Shipping Rifle Barrels (PVC Tube and Tennis Ball Method)
A new match-grade barrel can cost $350 or more, and it might take six months (or more) to replace it, given the current wait time with top barrel-makers. So, you don’t want your nice new tube to get damaged in transit. Forum Member Chuck L. (aka “M-61″) offers these tips for shipping rifle barrels:

shipping gun parts UPS FEDEX“Packing a barrel can be a problem. Here’s a shipping method that won’t stop lost shipments but so far has stopped damage. Get a PVC pipe (of size appropriate to your barrel) with fitted caps for each end. Attach a cap to one end. Tape the barrel threads and tape over the muzzle. Then drop one standard tennis ball into the pipe. Place barrel in pipe. Next add whatever peanuts or foam you can jam in to support the barrel on the sides. Then place a second tennis ball into the opposite end of the PVC pipe. (So now you have a tennis ball on either end of your barrel.) With everything secure inside, attach the upper cap and tape it down securely. With this packing procedure, when the carrier launches the pipe like a javelin, at least the barrel will not come through like a spear and be gone. Label the pipe with very large address labels so no one suspects it’s just garbage laying around. This procedure may seem ridiculous but it has worked for me. Oh and definitely get insurance. If your item is insured, the shippers will look harder to find it.”

Editor’s Note: Fedex also makes a triangular-profile cardboard shipping box. This 38″ x 6″ x 6″ x 6″ Fedex Tube (designed for blueprints and posters) is free for the asking. For most barrels, there should be enough clearance to hold your PVC tube (with barrel packed inside tube). However, don’t ship the barrel inside the cardboard box by itself. Cap and pad the ends and bubble wrap it heavily, or better yet, use the PVC tube method described above, with the PVC tube inside the box.

For More Packing and Shipping Advice, Read this Forum Thread.

Permalink - Articles, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Tech Tip 5 Comments »