June 18th, 2020

AR Trigger Round-Up: Geissele, Elftmann, Timney, and ALG

AR15 AR10 Trigger Geissele Timney Elftmann 2-stage ALG Defense modularTrigger images from PrimaryArms.com, which sells all the triggers reviewed here: Geissele, Elftmann, Timney, and ALG Defense.

Are you thinking of upgrading the trigger system for your AR-platform rifle? There are dozens of options available, from $45 up to $300. Thankfully, Brownells has created video reviews of some of the more popular AR trigger options from Timney, Geissele, and ALG Defense. And we included a video review of the highly-regarded Elftmann Match Trigger. If you want the best solution for Service Rifle competition, you might favor the Geisselle. For ease of installation, it’s hard to beat the Timney, a “drop-in” module. Like the Timney, the super-smooth Elftman is a drop-in module. At $249.00 it’s pricey, but it is one of the best AR triggers out there. If you’re on a tight budget, the best “bang for your buck” may be the “Perfected Mil-Spec” ALG which starts at around $45.00.

Geissele Enhanced Two-Stage Trigger

Geissele makes a variety of quality AR trigger sets both single-stage and two-stage. Many High Power competitors like the two-stage Geissele trigger. This delivers a repeatable, controlled pull through the first stage with a very clean break in the second stage. The Super Dynamic Enhanced Trigger, shown above, features a distinctive, trigger blade. Reviewer Thomas Conroy says: “The flat surface is very easy to press against. Both stages are light and very distinct.”

Elftmann Drop-In Match Trigger

Though pricey ($249.00 at PrimaryArms.com), we really like the Elftmann AR trigger. It combines the best of both worlds — the precision and smoothness of the Geissele with the Timney’s ease of installation. This single stage trigger is user-adjustable from 2.75 to 4 pounds pull weight. It is offered with either straight or curved trigger blade. Primary Arms says: “The amazingly short take-up, glass-rod crisp break and [near-zero] over-travel can be compared to the finest custom 1911 triggers.” The above video shows the installation process start to finish. There is also a “mil-spec” version for $162.00 at Primary Arms.

Timney Drop-In Trigger Module

This trigger module is available for both the AR15 and the AR10 platform (as covered in the above video). Timney triggers are easy to install and come with multiple pin size and pull-weight options. Reviewer Thomas Conroy confirms that the single-stage Timney “breaks cleanly and crisply. This trigger is modular, meaning that the trigger, sear, hammer, and spring are all encased in a bright, shiny yellow aluminum housing.”

ALG Defense Trigger — Higher-Quality Basic AR Trigger

According to Thomas Conroy, ALG triggers “are the perfected version of the standard, non-adjustable mil-spec original trigger. They have the same geometry, but are made to higher quality standards, and come with … hardened and smoothed-out sear contact surface to eliminate all grittiness.” These are also offered in a nickle-boron coated version. Available for under $50.00, the ALG is a well-made, low-cost option for shooters who want a better factory-type trigger system.

GET MORE INFO about AR-Platfrom Triggers

Learn more about Geissele, Timney and ALG triggers, plus two more AR trigger options (CMMG and Rock River Arms) in a Trigger Comparison Review by Thomas Conroy on Ammoland.com. And here is a very current (April 2020) review of 10 popular AR triggers:

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June 18th, 2020

NRA Firearm Science Videos Offer Insights on Many Topics

NRA firearms science videos ballistics chronography mil-dot eye dominance

NRA Media offers a series of informative videos about the Science of Shooting, covering a wide range of topics, from eye dominance to long-range ballistics. These videos feature high production values, with super-slow motion segments, as well as helpful computer graphics to illustrate the principles covered.

The videos are narrated by Jessie Duff, a top action pistol shooter (and the first women ever to achieve USPSA Grand Master status). Jessie is assisted by talented shooters such as Top Shot Season 4 Champion Chris Cheng. There are over forty videos in the Firearm Science Video Series. Here are five NRA videos, with links to others below. You’ll find all NRA Firearm Science Videos HERE

BULLET TRAJECTORY — Factors at Play and Zeroing Strategies

Host Jessie Duff and Veteran Air Force Sniper and Long Range Expert George Reinas help us understand the factors behind bullet trajectory. NOTE: There are some exaggerations in the graphics in the videos, and inconsistent terminology use, but it’s still a helpful basic primer on the subject of trajectories.

SHOOTING POSITIONS — Prone, Standing, Sitting, Kneeling

Olympic Gold Medalist Jamie Gray demonstrates the four positions used by competition shooters: Prone, Standing, Sitting, and Kneeling. Helpful overlay graphics show how the human skeleton aligns in each of these positions. This video should help hunters as well as competitive position shooters. If you shoot silhouette, definitely watch this video!

ZEROING RIFLES for Long Range — Tech Tips

The process of zeroing rifles for long range is covered in this Firearm Science video featuring George Reinas, a veteran Air Force sniper. George demonstrates how to adjust his scope to compensate for bullet drop at long range. Our friend Dennis Santiago was involved in the making of this video, which was filmed at the Burbank Rifle & Revolver Club in Southern California.

CHRONOGRAPHS — Calculating the Speed of a Bullet

pistol shooting science Jessie Duff NRA Ballistic PendulumThis video shows a conventional chronograph with front and rear light sensors. The bullet first trips the front sensor and then the rear sensor as it flies over the unit. The difference in sensor time is used to calculate bullet speed. This is not the only kind of chrono in common use today. The popular MagnetoSpeed chrono works by tracking the bullet as it passes over two magnetic sensors mounted on a bayonet-style fixture on the barrel.

The high-tech LabRadar chronograph employs Doppler Radar to measure the speed of a bullet without the need to send the round directly over sensors. No need to set up tripods down-range. Just set the unit near your rifle’s muzzle, on the side. There is also an inertial trigger accessory for LabRadars. Interestingly, this video also explains how, in the days before electric lamps, digital processors, and radar, scientists used a mechanical “Ballistic Pendulum” to calculate bullet velocity using Newtonian physics. The Ballistic Pendulum (shown at right) was first used in the mid 1700s.

EYE DOMINANCE — How to Determine Which Eye is Dominant

Host Jessie Duff and longtime shooter Krystie Messenger demonstrate how eye dominance affects aim and teach you how to determine your dominant eye in this edition of Firearm Science. There are very simple tests you can do to determine your eye dominance. This Editor is right-handed but left-eye dominant. All competitive shooters should check for eye dominance. If you are cross-dominant, you can alter your head position or put a paper patch on one frame of your shooting glasses.

Other NRA Firearm Science Videos

Firearm Science: Using Mil-Dots to Estimate Range

Firearm Science: Terminal Ballistics

Firearm Science: Rimfire vs. Centerfire

Firearm Science: Eye Protection

Firearm Science: Shooting Moving Targets

Firearm Science: Trigger Control (Pistol)

Firearm Science: Aiming Handguns

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June 18th, 2020

Winchester Earns Huge $38 Million Pistol Ammo Contract

Winchester U.S. Military army 9mm pistol ammo ammunition contract

Winchester Ammunition has been selected for a $38 million contract by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). This contract will be for 9x19mm (9mm Luger) handgun ammunition. The selected 9mm frangible ammunition will be used for close-quarter battle (CQB) combat and indoor/outdoor CQB training.

Since World War I, Winchester has been the U.S. Army’s largest commercial supplier of small-caliber ammunition. Currently, Winchester is the largest supplier of certified U.S. mil-spec small-caliber ammunition to the U.S. military. Winchester will assume full operational control of the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant in October 2020. Lake City is the largest small-caliber ammunition military production facility in the United States. Winchester is a world leader in production of small caliber ammunition.

U.S. Military’s 9mm Handguns — SIG Sauer M17 and M18

How will all that Winchester 9mm ammo be used? This ammo will be loaded into the U.S. military’s latest M17/M18 handguns from SIG Sauer, as well as remaining older Beretta M9s. The SIG Sauer M17 and M18 are striker-fired service pistols. In 2017 the U.S. Army announced that a modified version of the SIG Sauer P320 had won the Army’s XM17 Modular Handgun System competition. The U.S. Air Force has also adopted the M17, while the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy will be issuing the smaller M18 pistols.

M17 M18 Sig Sauer Handgun

The M17 is the full-sized model while the smaller-sized carry model is designated M18. Both M17 and M18 service pistols are striker-fired handguns with polymer frames. The M17/M18 have proven reliable and popular with U.S. military personnel. The smaller M18 successfully completed a MHS material reliability test, which consisted of firing three M18 pistols to 12,000 rounds each for a total of 36,000 rounds.

The M17/M18s feature a coyote-tan PVD coated stainless steel slide, coyote-tan controls, a coyote-tan grip module. SIG offers both 17-round and 21-round magazines. These handguns can be equipped with SIGLITE sights (orange rear & green front). Models are available with removable night sight rear plates that can adapt to electro-optic red dot sights.

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