June 27th, 2020

Krieger Barrel Shines in .22 LR Rimfire Ammo Testing

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom
All photos hosted on Imgur as posted by Padom.

Serious riflemen know that Krieger makes outstanding centerfire barrels that hold world records and have won many National Championships. But did you know that Krieger makes great rimfire barrels too? Well, Krieger does make outstanding .22 LR rimfire match barrels that can deliver impressive accuracy.

Sniper’s Hide moderator “Padom” recently tested a variety of rimfire ammo types, employing five different barrels: Krieger, Bartlein, Benchmark, Lilja, and Green Mountain. He tested at both 50 yards and 100 yards. FULL Rimfire TEST REPORT HERE.

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom

Reporting on the 50-yard test, Padom posted: “Had a virtually dead calm day today for 50-yard RimX testing (Keystone Accuracy RimX barreled action with 1:16″ Krieger 20″ barrel). A few infrequent 3 mph gusts but pretty dead [calm] and the target showed. This Krieger just barely edged out the Bartlein by 0.003″ with a 0.177″ 6×5 with SK Rifle Match. The 10×5 was 0.198″. The best lots of Center-X weren’t far behind either. This is the first Krieger rimfire [barrel] I’ve shot and it didn’t disappoint.”

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom
Padom noted: “Winds were much calmer tonight than this morning so the 100-yard Krieger test was a success. Winds were pretty consistent [at] 3-5 mph.”

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padomTest Results at 100 Yards
Padom then tested ammo at 100 yards, again using his Krieger rimfire barrel: “To recap, the Krieger shot the best 50-yard results of the barrels tested so far, just barely beating the Bartlein but it was so close you can call the 50-yard results equal (.005). Well the Krieger beat all the barrels tested to date at 100 yards by a pretty good margin with Center-X. The 10×5 was incredible as well at just barely over 0.6″ showing the results were very consistent. A second lot of Center-X was right there with the previous 100-yard 6×5 best results just barely over 0.6. The third lot of Center-X shot a respectable 0.75″ 6×5. This Krieger sure is shooting very nicely. I’m really looking forward to shooting it at 300 and 400 yards[.]”

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom

Components Tested: 20″ Krieger M24 barrel, .22 LR Match Eachus chamber 0.046 headspace, Zermatt RimX Action, Bix’N Andy TacSport Pro 2-Stage Trigger, RimX 10rd magazine, XLR Envy Pro Folding Chassis, Athlon Cronus BTR 4.5-29x56mm MIL scope.

Shooting Set-up: 100 Yards Prone with Bipod and Rear Bag.

Krieger barrel .22 LR center-X rimfire ammo ammunition testing Sniper's Hide padom

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Competition, Gear Review, Gunsmithing 2 Comments »
June 27th, 2020

.300 Blackout Fired in .223 Rem AR — Recipe for Disaster

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56
Photos and Facebook post by Tactical Rifle Shooters

Yet another .300 Blackout disaster. Unfortunately, that .300 Blackout cartridge can fit in a .223 Rem chamber. Shooting a .308-caliber bullet in .223 bore is a recipe for disaster.

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56The .300 AAC Blackout aka “300 BLK”, is a compact 30-caliber cartridge designed to work in AR-15 rifles. It has a shorter cartridge case to accommodate the bigger 30-caliber bullet while still fitting in a standard AR-15 magazine. Unfortunately, that’s the danger. A careless shooter can toss a .300 Blackout cartridge in with .223 Rem rounds without noting. And because the case-head size is the same as the .223 Rem (5.56×45) the rifle’s bolt assembly will happily chamber and fire the .300 BLK round. Problem is, that forces a .308 diameter bullet down an undersized .223-caliber bore. Not good!

This images were provided by Tactical Rifle Shooters on Facebook. The message was clear: “Don’t try to run 300 Blackout in your .223/5.56mm. It won’t end well. The problem is identical rifles and identical magazines but different calibers.”

For those who MUST have a .300 Blackout, here are some things you can do:

1. Use different colored magazines for .300 Blackout vs. .223 Rem.
2. Fit all your uppers with caliber-labeled ejection port covers.
3. Mark .223 Rem upper handguards with the caliber in bright paint.
4. Mark all .300 BLK Rounds with heavy black marker.

.300 AAC Blackout 300 BLK kaboom accident blowup cartridge failure barrel .223 Rem 5.56

Comments by Folks Who Viewed these .300 Blackout Disaster Photos:

“The .300 Blackout is simply a badly-designed round. A properly-designed round would have had a feature in the shape that would have prevented cross loading in the first place.” — D. Santiago

“I almost made that mistake… I had a magazine of 300 BLK inserted in my .223/5.56 all night. Fortunately, I never pulled the trigger. Once I realized the mistake, I almost got ill. [After that incident] I no longer own a 300 BLK.” — B. Welch

“Happened to me hog hunting from a helo. Gun exploded in my face.” — B. Hood

“Fire-forming projectiles [is] so wrong in centerfire!” — M. Stres

“Had some dude come into the store the other day wanting .300 Blackout ammo to shoot in his 5.56 AR. It took 15 minutes of explaining for him to understand you got to have a .300 Blackout Upper!” — R. Williams

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gunsmithing, Tactical, Tech Tip 1 Comment »
June 27th, 2020

With Social Unrest — Indoor Ranges Are Important for Training

NSSF indoor range survey pistol shooters Southwick Associates range report
Photo courtesy Silver Eagle Group Shooting Range, Northern Virginia.

With the civil disorder, rioting, and looting happening in major U.S. cities, many Americans are getting very serious about armed self-defense. But if you own defensive firearms, you definitely need to train with them. Indoor ranges are most convenient for those who live near urban centers, where the biggest threats to public safety currently exist. This article talks about indoor firearms training and the proper procedures you should follow at indoor ranges.

This Video Covers Basic Gun Range Safety Rules and Etiquette

FIVE IMPORTANT SAFETY PROCEDURES for Indoor Ranges

1. Follow the Three Fundamental Rules for Safe Gun Handling
ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.

2. Follow ALL Range Officer Instructions
ROs are the first and final authority on any range and their decisions are generally final. Arguing with a Range Officer may just get you thrown out.

3. Don’t Bother Others or Touch Their Guns
Respect other shooters’ privacy unless a safety issue arises. Do NOT engage other shooters to correct a perceived safety violation unless absolutely necessary – inform the RO instead. NEVER handle or touch another shooter’s firearm without their permission!

4. Know Your Range’s Rules
Review and understand any and all range rules and requirements/expectations. For example, what is the range’s maximum rate of fire? Are you allowed to collect your brass?

5. Know What To Do During a Cease Fire
IMMEDIATELY set down your firearm, pointed downrange, and STEP AWAY from the shooting booth (or bench). Range Officers do not want shooters trying to “secure/unload” their firearms in a cease fire situation — they want the shooters separated from their guns instantly.

NSSF indoor range survey pistol shooters Southwick Associates range report

BAD RANGE BEHAVIOR — Five Things NOT to Do at the Range

Here are the five worst behaviors we’ve seen at indoor ranges. These behaviors are both dangerous and inconsiderate. Any one of these behaviors can get you permanently banned from an indoor range.

1. Sweeping other individuals after loading a weapon behind the firing line is very bad. All your weapons should be empty until you reach your shooting station.

2. Turning the handgun sideways while trying to clear a malfunction or insert/remove a magazine. This will point the muzzle at a fellow shooter. Or, after shooting a gun, the shooter fails to clear the weapon and then places the gun somewhere near the shooting station with the muzzle in an unsafe position.

3. Reacting unpredictably when firing a high recoil handgun. We’ve seen people take a second shot by accident with the muzzle way off target.

4. Not obeying range commands — in particular continuing to shoot during called cease-fires.

5. Poorly aimed shooting that hits target frames or carriers, causing ricochets.

Double-Up on Hearing Protection When Shooting Indoors
When shooting indoors we recommend quality muffs with earplugs underneath, offering double protection. When inside an enclosed range, with other shooters blasting away right next to you, you really need effective hearing protection. But you also need to hear range commands and be able to communicate. That’s why we recommend electronic muffs with plugs underneath.

indoor range survey results NSSF

For pistol shooting, we like the latest Howard Leight Impact Pro Muffs. These offer an impressive 30 dB Noise Reduction Rating (NRR). In addition, these muffs are pretty comfortable and offer Headphone Functionality so you can connect to your smartphone, MP3 player, or other audio device. These muffs are a good value. They are currently offered for $39.50 on ALLMAX.

Howard Leight Impact Pro Electronic Muffs NRR 30

Permalink - Articles, Handguns, News, Shooting Skills No Comments »