April 6th, 2021

Nancy Tompkins Wins 3rd Straight Western Wildcat Smallbore

Lapua Nancy Tompkins Western Wildcat winner Ben Avery Arizona

For the third consecutive year, Team Lapua member Nancy Tompkins has brought home the Western Wildcat International Smallbore title using Lapua Center-X .22 LR ammunition. The Western Wildcat event was hosted by the Desert Sharpshooters Rifle Club March 15-21, 2021 at the Ben Avery Shooting Complex in Phoenix, Arizona. Tompkins won the Grand Aggregate with a commanding 6392-508X (of possible 6400). This year marked a “three-peat” for Nancy, who also won the last two Western Wildcat smallbore titles.

Tompkins Lapua Center-X .22LR ammunition is matched to her firearm at Lapua’s Rimfire Performance Center in Mesa, Arizona. Unique lots of ammunition are tested at 50 and 100 meters simultaneously, identifying the best performing ammunition for purchase. This testing service is available to all shooters who wish to gain a competitive advantage. Schedule your testing here at either of Lapua’s Rimfire Performance Centers located in Mesa, AZ or Marengo, OH.

Lapua Nancy Tompkins Western Wildcat winner Ben Avery Arizona

Tompkins stated, “The 2021 Western Wildcat Smallbore matches were challenging, but a great time of shooting and enjoying friends. It was just a year ago that the world was shut down due to the pandemic. The 2020 Wildcat was canceled as was most everything for many months. While travel is still challenging for some and impossible for our overseas friends, we had over a dozen first time shooters to the Wildcat and thankfully many of our longtime participants.”

“I always say that the best part of shooting is the people, and that still holds true. That includes the shooters, the workers, and the sponsors that contribute their time and/or product to make this match what it is. I would like to thank Lapua for making precision ammo that allows me and others to achieve their highest possible scores. Winning the Western Wildcat three times in a row is an honor for which I am truly thankful.” — Nancy Tompkins

Nancy Tompkins Cactus Classic rimfire

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April 6th, 2021

Springfield M1A Resources and M1A Match at Camp Perry

Springfield M1A gunsmith armorer's course AGI

Do you own a Springfield M1A (or wish you did)? Then you should watch this 5-minute video from the American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI). This video shows the basics of the operation of the popular M1A rifle, the civilian version of the military M14. In this video, gunsmith John Bush field-strips the M1A and shows how the bolt, op rod, and trigger group fits together and operates. This video contains excerpts from the M1A Rifle Armorer’s Course, AGI Course #1584. The full Armorer’s Course is available on DVD from www.AmericanGunsmith.com.

Watch Highlights of AGI M1A Rifle Armorer’s Course:

Springfield M1A rifle camp perry m14 .308 win AGI

Springfield M1A gunsmith armorer's course AGI

2021 CMP Springfield M1A Match at Camp Perry

The 14th annual Springfield Armory M1A Match will take place during the 2021 CMP National Rifle Matches. The CMP will host the event on Sunday, August 8, 2021. Competitors of all experience levels are encouraged to bring their M1A rifles to Camp Perry and compete. CMP Online Registration commenced April 1, 2021. The match is open to all individuals ages 12 and above. For more information contact the CMP at competitions@thecmp.org or call 419-635-2141 ext. 724 or 714.

Springfield M1A match high power rifle

The Springfield Armory M1A match began with one man’s idea and passion. Springfield Armory’s Mike Doy witnessed the waning of classic M1 Garand and M1A rifles from the competitive High Power firing lines. “I really wanted to get those M1A rifles out of safes and closets and back out onto the field. So 11 years ago, I promoted the idea of running an M1A-specific match at Camp Perry. That first year we had over 600 competitors and spectators.” Now the match offers some of the biggest pay-outs at Camp Perry. In recent years, Springfield Armory has donated over $25,000 worth of cash and prizes, including a $2,000 cash award to the overall winner.

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April 6th, 2021

Determine Your Dominant Eye with This Simple Test

6.5 Creedmoor Annealing

Shooting Sports USA Eye dominanceDo you know which one of your eyes is dominant? It’s easy to determine eye dominance with a simple exercise. Pick an object about 6-10 feet away (a light switch or door knob works well). Make an “OK” sign with your right hand (see photo) and hold that about 18″ from your face. Now, with both eyes open, look through the circle formed by your thumb and index finger. Center the circle on the object, so you can see the object in the middle.

Now, here’s the important part — while still holding your hand up, centered on the object, first close your right eye. If you don’t see the object anymore, then your right eye is dominant. If you still see the object, then repeat the procedure with the left eye shut and right eye open. If you don’t see the object when your left eye (only) is closed, then you are left-eye dominant.

6.5 Creedmoor AnnealingThe digital archives of Shooting Sports USA contain many interesting articles. A while back, Shooting Sports USA featured a “must-read” expert Symposium on Eye Dominance, as it affects both rifle and pistol shooting. No matter whether you have normal dominance (i.e. your dominant eye is on the same side as your dominant hand), or if you have cross-dominance, you’ll benefit by reading this excellent article. The physiology and science of eye dominance is explained by Dr. Norman Wong, a noted optometrist. In addition, expert advice is provided by champion shooters such as David Tubb, Lones Wigger, Dennis DeMille, Julie Golob, Jessie Harrison, and Phil Hemphill.

Top Rifle Champions Talk About Eye Dominance:

David Tubb — 11-Time National High Power Champion
I keep both eyes open, always. Some use an opaque blinder in rifle or shotgun shooting. If you close your non-dominant eye, you will not get as good a sight picture. If your aiming eye is not your dominant eye, you have even more of a problem to overcome.

Lones Wigger — World, National and Olympic Champion Rifleman
Shooters should try to use the dominant eye unless the vision is impaired and the non-dominant eye has better vision. You should always shoot with both eyes open since this will allow the shooting eye to function properly.

Dennis DeMille — National Service Rifle Champion
I close my non-shooting eye initially. Once I pick up my sight picture, it’s not something I focus on. For those that use a patch, I recommend that they use something white to block their view, rather than cover the eye.

Bruce Piatt — 2015 World Shooting Championship Winner
Some shooters, especially those with nearly equal or cross-dominance, will naturally find themselves squinting one eye. When anyone does this, you are also closing your dominant eye to some extent and adding stress to your face.

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