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November 7th, 2021

Sunday Gunday: Elmer Keith’s Firearms, $1.9 Million Worth

Elmer Keith Gun auction guns & Ammo magazine

Back in 2015, the firearms collection of famed gun writer Elmer Keith went to auction. The Keith Estate auction drew interest from around the globe, and bidding was strong. When the dust settled, and all the individual lots were totaled, Keith’s remarkable collection sold to various bidders for $1,905,458!

Elmer Keith Gun auction guns & Ammo magazine

High-priced highlights from the auction are shown below. NOTE: You can see more than 60 other Elmer Keith firearms, along with a list of final auction prices. The Guns & Ammo website has a detailed, illustrated report on the Elmer Keith auction with dozens of high-quality photos.

CLICK HERE to see many more firearms from the Elmer Keith Estate Auction.


Elmer Keith was an American rancher, firearms enthusiast, and author. Keith was instrumental in the development of the first magnum revolver cartridge, the .357 Magnum, as well as the later .44 Magnum and .41 Magnum cartridges, credited by Roy G. Jinks as “the father of big bore handgunning.” These videos recount Keith’s personal history and his influence on the design of modern Magnum cartridges.


Lot 1038: Colonel Jim Corbett’s .450/.400 “Tiger Rifle” (Sold for $264,500.00)

Elmer Keith Estate Auction Corbett Rifle Tiger boxlock

Dangerous Game Rifles in Collection
The legendary “Corbett Tiger Rifle”, a Jeffery boxlock .450/400 was used by famed hunter Edward James “Jim” Corbett. This rifle was featured in Corbett’s book Man-Eaters of Kumaon. Two of the man-eating tigers Corbett hunted were believed to have killed over 800 humans in the Kumaon Hills of India.

Elmer Keith Estate Gun Collection auction


Lot 1005: Colt SAA No. 5 .44 Special “The Last Word in Sixguns” (Sold for $80,500.00)
This famous revolver started as a Colt SAA, but then was heavily modified. The top strap of the frame was welded up into a flat-top target configuration, with an adjustable rear sight added. The hammer was modified with a Bisley-type target spur. The unique grip of the Number Five was created by marrying a modified Bisley backstrap to a Single Action Army trigger guard. His most famous pistol, Keith called this handgun “The last word in fine six-guns”.

Elmer Keith Estate .357 Magnum bisley elmer keith

This video showcases this rare Colt SAA revolver, as viewed at the auction:


Lot 1060: Pachmayar Custom Model 70 .375 H&H (Sold for $22,425.00)
This may be one of the most beautiful model 70 Winchesters ever created. Listed as “Pachmayar Custom M70 .375 H&H with Full Coverage Engraving and Exhibition Wood” this rifle sold for $22,425.00 at the Elmer Keith Estate Collection auction. Look at the figure in that wood! The detailed engraving on the action and barrel is fantastic, as is the checkering on the grip.

Elmer Keith Gun auction guns & Ammo magazine


Lot 1041: Westley Richards Droplock .476 NE (Sold for $69,000.00)
Used by Elmer Keith on safari in Tanzania, this was Keith’s preferred Elephant Rifle.

Elmer Keith Estate Auction drop lock Big Game Dangerous Elephant rifle


Lot 1020: Smith & Wesson Triple Lock Target Revolvers. (Sold for $39,100.00)
This rare set belonged to Gerrit Forbes and Ed McGivern before being acquired by Elmer Keith.

Elmer Keith Estate Auction Forbes Ed McGivern Target Pistols

Photos courtesy of James D. Julia Auctioneers, Fairfield, Maine.
Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
November 7th, 2021

Annealing Made Perfect (AMP) — Technical Overview

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

When Annealing Made Perfect (AMP), a New Zealand-based company, first unveiled its original induction annealing machine at SHOT Show 2015, it was big news in the reloading world. This was a real breakthrough — an induction annealer running on electricity that was fully programmable. No more flames to fuss with. The advent of the AMP annealer was a true “game-changer” for the shooting enthusiasts who reloaded their ammo.

The AMP system is based on smart science and modern technology. Right from the start, AMP invested in advanced lab equipment (such as gear for Micro-Vickers hardness testing). AMP also worked with independent outside metallurgical laboratories. And AMP invited shooters from around the world to send in sample cartridge cases. AMP accumulated a huge archive of cartridges from .17 Hornet to an array of .50 BMG wildcats and everything in-between. AMP’s archive includes multiple brands and even different lot numbers of the same cartridge. AMP now offers the most highly developed and precise consumer annealing system on the planet. That is because of the amazing amount of R&D behind the product, plus the use of advanced technologies.

Annealing Under the Microscope — Informative Articles

Alex and Matt Findlay have produced a series of articles called “Annealing Under the Microscope”. The first of these was released in July 2017. Part 1 was a general explanation of annealing, and busted a number of myths. It examined the repeatability of annealing over multiple reloads, and conducted a series of tensile bullet pull tests.

FULL ARTICLE LINK: Annealing Under the Microscope, Part One

Annealing Different Brands of Brass
Part 2 of Annealing Under the Microscope covered an important topic — annealing for different brands of brass. This article examines the reasons why different brands of the same cartridge can require different annealing settings. The article also reveals that lot to lot variations of the same brand of brass can make a big difference.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

FULL ARTICLE LINK: Annealing Different Brands of Brass for Same Cartridge Type

AZTEC Annealing System — AMP Annealers become Smart Machines
In late 2017, Alex and Matt started the development of their revolutionary AZTEC system, which in effect transformed AMP annealers into SMART annealers. It meant that individual customers could analyse their own cases with laboratory grade accuracy without the need to send samples to the AMP lab for calibration.

Part 3 of Annealing Under the Microscope was released in July 2018 after nearly 12 months of R&D on AZTEC. It focused on how to best utilize this new self-calibration capability. It also highlighted the difference between several “premium” brands of brass compared to cheaper alternatives.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology
AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

FULL ARTICLE LINK: AZTEC Control — “Smart” Self-Calibration Annealing Technology

Benefits of Precision Annealing — Accuracy and Repeatability
Part 4 of the series was released in September 2019. It focused on the true benefits of accurate annealing, and the arguments for annealing every reload. The study identified sizing accuracy and repeatability as the key factor. This article also revealed the first prototype of AMP’s new auto bullet seater with seating pressure data capture.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

FULL ARTICLE LINK: Benefits of Precision Annealing — Accuracy and Repeatability

Proof on the Target — Down-Range Benefits of Annealing
In Part 5 of the series, AMP’s experts focus on the real world, down-range benefits of annealing, turned out to be a much more complex process than AMP initially planned. Accordingly, Part 5 was conducted in three stages, with three detailed write-ups.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

The Part 5, Stage 1 paper examined sizing accuracy of annealed vs un-annealed cases, taking two sets of three identical Peterson Cartridge .308 Winchester cases through twenty (20) reloading cycles. For every cycle, cases were measured both fire-formed and as re-sized. With each cycle the cases were measured for case length, shoulder bump, neck OD, and head OD.

FULL ARTICLE LINK: Annealed vs. Un-Annealed: 20 Load Cycles with .308 Win

Field Testing in Tennessee — Proof on Target
The Part 5, Stage 2 article covered detailed ballistic testing using multiple rifles, cartridges, and shooters at the Strategic Edge range in Tennessee.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

The Tennessee testing sessions accumulated a wealth of data on velocity spreads and group sizes right out to 1,000 yards. The evidence showed a clear advantage for annealed brass, both for average group size and average Extreme Spread for the groups shot with AMP-annealed cases.

FULL ARTICLE LINK: AMP Annealing Tennessee Long Range Field Testing

Underground Testing with Lou Murdica
Lastly, AMP’s Part 5, Stage 3 paper featured testing by Lou Murdica at an underground range in California. We have previously shown a video of Lou shooting one case, then reloading it and shooting the same case into the same hole at 100 yards.

AMP Annealing Made Perfect science under microscope technology

This time he repeated the feat, shooting one un-annealed case twenty times into the one hole. Then Lou produced another even smaller 20-shot group, shot with a case which he annealed before every shot.

FULL ARTICLE LINK: AMP Annealing Underground Testing

Enjoy These Technical Articles from AMP Annealing
Collectively AMP’s “Annealing Under the Microscope” series represents a remarkable body of outstanding work. Whether you anneal your cartridge brass now, or just want to learn more about the benefits of annealing, we recommend you take a look at this series of informative articles.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tech Tip No Comments »
November 7th, 2021

How Speedy Are You? Take the Reaction-Time Test

reaction time test

Precision rifle shooters don’t have to hit a big-league fastball, or launch a top-fuel dragster in the blink of an eye. Nonetheless, reaction times are important in our sport — both for competitive shooters and hunters. Want to catch that prairie dog before he slips down his hole? You’ll need to be quick. Want to win at short-range benchrest? Then you’ll need to watch your windflags and respond quickly to a change. Miss a major wind-shift and you could ruin your whole weekend.

Here’s a fun test of reaction times from HumanBenchmark.com. The way it works is that, after clicking “Start”, you wait until the background color changes from red to green. The instant you see green, immediately click your mouse. The average (median) reaction time is 215 milliseconds. Hint: If you keep your finger “preloaded” in contact with your mouse button you can shave some milliseconds — but don’t “jump the gun”.


CLICK HERE to Take Reaction Time Test…

reaction time test

Tips for Faster Times
Here are three tips to speed up your reaction times:

1) Respond to the color change (by itself), rather than wait to read the word “CLICK!” after the box shifts to green.
2) Try focusing at the corner of the box, rather than the center. This may help you react “without thinking”.
3) Have your index finger “poised and ready” over the left button–you can shave milliseconds by very slightly depressing the button before you actually click.

Permalink Competition, Shooting Skills No Comments »