April 13th, 2019

Build Your Own Rifle with Affordable Howa Barreled Actions

Howa 1500 Mini action barreled sale action HACT trigger Brownells deal

Right now, Brownells is running a big sale on Howa Barreled Actions, in a wide variety of chamberings. You may want to pick up one of these barreled actions, which start at $259.99. We like Howa actions — they are smooth, and they feature an excellent two-stage trigger. Howa also offers a unique Mini Action, which is great for a small-caliber varmint rig.

Howa Barreled Action Basics

The above video shows the basics of the Howa barreled actions, which are offered in Mini, Standard, and Long Action versions, with dozens of chamberings, from .204 Ruger all the way up to .300 Winchester Magnum. If you’re not familiar with Howa barreled actions you should be. Each barreled action comes with Howa’s Lifetime Warranty and is guaranteed to deliver sub-MOA performance at 100-yards when using premium factory ammo. The Howa 1500 barreled action also features a crisp two-stage trigger, three-position safety, 70° bolt throw, M16-style extractor, two-lug bolt design and a flat bottom receiver with an integral recoil lug.

Howa 1500 Mini action barreled sale action HACT trigger Brownells deal

Howa Barreled Action Project Videos

Brownells has created a series of helpful videos showing how to put together an accurate rifle using a Howa barreled action. We think this is a sensible, cost-effective option for a varmint rifle, or entry-level tactical rig. Not counting optics, you should be able to assemble a good shooting, general-purpose rifle for under $700.00.

1. Long-Range Precision Rifle Build
Here the Brownells team puts together a nice tactical rifle in an MDT modular aluminum chassis made specifically for the Howa 1500 action. Attached, AR-style, to the back end of the chassis, is a Luth-AR adjustable buttstock also sold by Brownells. An EGW Picatinny rail is fitted to the action for mounting a Nightforce optic. As you can see in the video, the entire build takes less than 10 minutes. Using this Howa 1500 heavy-barreled action, you can save hundreds over the cost of a factory tactical rifle, and we bet the accuracy will be better than you’ll get with some popular brands. We’ve seen heavy-barreled Howas shoot well under 1 MOA.

2. Hunting Rifle Build
In this video, Brownells puts together a general-purpose hunting rifle using the Howa 1500 barreled action. This was attached to a Hogue Overmolded stock with internal aluminum bedding block. Fitted to the top of the action is an EGW Picatinny Rail with a Sig Sauer scope in Leupold rings. As with the Precision Rifle build above, the entire assembly process took less than ten minutes. This was done with a standard-length Howa action, but the same procedure could be used with the Howa Mini Action, or a Long Action. NOTE: No separate bedding compound was used here. That’s an option that would extend build time significantly.

Check out the Prices for Howa Barreled Actions
Here are some of the Howa Barreled Actions currently in stock at Brownells. NOTE: This is just a partial sample — there are many other varieties:

.223 Rem, 20″ Heavy Barrel, $399.99
6.5 Grendel, Mini Heavy Barrel, $389.99
6.5 Creedmoor, 24″ Heavy Barrel, $399.99
6.5 Creedmoor, 26″ Heavy Barrel, $429.99
7mm-08, Std Cerakote, $579.99
7.62×39, Mini Light Barrel, $259.99
.308 Win, 20″ Heavy Barrel, $289.99
.308 Win, 24″ Heavy Barrel, $299.99
.30-06 Sprg, 22″ Sporter Barrel, Cerakote, $349.99
.300 Win Mag, 24″ Heavy Barrel, $279.99

Howa Barreled action sale Brownells PRS HACT Trigger

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April 10th, 2019

World Shooting Championship on Shooting USA TV Today

world shooting championship shooting usa television Scoutten

This week Shooting USA features the NRA’s World Shooting Championship (WSC), held at the Peacemaker National Training Center in West Virginia. This unique, multi-discipline Pro-Am Competition draws 300 shooters, with all firearms provided by manufacturers. Designed to find the “best at everything that goes bang”, the WSC combines scores from a dozen disciplines to select the best all-around shooting champion. What’s at stake? Glory plus over $250,000 in cash and prizes!

WSC Highlight Video with Competitor Interviews:

To succeed at the WSC, competitors must be skilled with all types of firearms, bolt-action rifles, semi-auto rifles, shotguns, semi-auto pistols, and even single action six-guns. For every stage, the firearms are provided by match sponsors, so no competitor gains an advantage by using his or her own guns.

WSC World Shooting Championship Peacemaker West Viginia Shooting USA

The challenges range from sporting clays, to PRS-style rifle stages, to Bianchi plate racks shot with handguns, and even a simulated Olympic Biathlon competition. That requires that competitors be fit and have a diverse skill set — you need to be outstanding with every type of firearm.

Shooting USA TV airs Wednesday, 12/19/18 at 9:00 PM Eastern and Pacific; 8:00 PM Central

WSC World Shooting Championship Peacemaker West Viginia Shooting USA

This episode also feature a history segment, a gun-building segment, and a Pro Tip from Maggie Reese. Shooting USA showcases the Crockett rifles from Tennessee that armed Andrew Jackson’s Militia on his way to stop the British in New Orleans. Then, John Scoutten finishes a JP Enterprises AR accuracy build. Lastly Maggie Reese shows how to start a pistol stage from a table with an empty gun.

WSC World Shooting Championship Peacemaker West Viginia Shooting USA
Maggie Reese now shoots for Team Ruger along with Doug Koenig.

Maggie notes: “We spend a lot of time in competition working a draw from a holster position, but sometimes when you go to competition you will have to do an unloaded or loaded table start. So I want to take you through some techniques on how to maximize that first shot and get an efficient time.”

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April 8th, 2019

Taurus Moves from Metro Miami to Bainbridge, Georgia

Forjas Taurus revolver curve pistol Bainbridge Georgia factory Miami

Taurus, the Brazilian-owned fireams maker, is moving its main North American manufacturing center from Miami, Florida to Bainbridge, Georgia. Taurus is now building a new 205,000-square foot factory in Bainbridge. When the facility is fully operational later this year, Taurus expects to employ over 400 people. Those 400+ jobs will be appreciated in Bainbridge, which was hit hard by Hurricane Michael in 2018.

Taurus President David Blenker stated: “We’re in a very good place right now [with] a great management team, enthusiastic designers, sales people and core workers… and soon a great new facility here in Bainbridge.” See Full Report in The Shooting Wire.

Forjas Taurus revolver curve pistol Bainbridge Georgia factory Miami

Taurus Firearms Overview

Forjas Taurus is a manufacturing conglomerate based in São Leopoldo, Brazil. Founded as a tool and die manufacturer, the company now consists of divisions focusing on firearms, metals manufacturing, plastics, body armor, helmets, and civil construction.

Forjas Taurus revolver curve pistol Bainbridge Georgia factory Miami

Taurus was originally known for manufacturing revolvers similar to those offered by Smith & Wesson. The company moved away from this realm by offering larger-framed models such as the Raging Bull (.454 Casull) and Raging Hornet (.22 Hornet) revolvers as well as the Judge 5-shot revolvers.

One of the most innovative Taurus models is the Curve. This unique .380 ACP handgun features a curved polymer frame. This unique design makes the Curve more comfortable for inside-the-belt concealed carry.

The popular Taurus PT92 is similar to Beretta’s model 92, but with the addition of an ambidextrous frame safety, rather than the Beretta’s slide-mounted safety. A recent addition to the Taurus pistol lineup is the PT1911, copy of the classic .45 ACP Colt 1911 pistol.

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April 8th, 2019

NSSF Video Shows Sitting, Kneeling, and Standing Positions

When hunting or when competing in a field tactical match, you need to be able to shoot from a variety of positions. While the prone position is normally the most stable, hunters (and tactical marksmen) will encounter situations that demand the ability to shoot from a higher position.

In this NSSF Video, Ryan Cleckner, a former Sniper Instructor for the 1st Ranger Battalion, explains how to shoot from sitting, kneeling, and standing positions. Cleckner demonstrates both rested and non-rested variations of these three positions. Cleckner explains: “When you’re out hunting, often times you’re going to have grass or obstacles in your way, so [prone is] not practical — you’re going to have to get higher up off the ground. However, the problem with getting higher off the ground is that you are less stable. As a rule, the closer we are to the ground, the more stable we are… so we are going to [encounter] problems as we get taller up. I’m going to teach you some tricks to get you as stable as possible….”

Cleckner demonstrates the proper kneeling/sitting/standing body positions and he shows how to use your sling for extra support. This video also demonstrates the use of “field expedient” rests that provide a front support point for the rifle. Both hunters and field tactical shooters should find this 7-minute video very informative, and well worth watching.

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April 5th, 2019

The Rimfire Wheelgun — Why You Really Need One

Smith Wesson 22 .22 LR Revolver model 63 17 617 wheelgun revolver cylinder
Early 6-shot Model 617 shown. Current Model 617s have 10-round cylinders.

“But Honey, I really do need a new gun….”

If you are looking for justification for getting a new handgun, show your spouse this article. Today we explain why every serious shooter should have a .22 LR wheelgun. Rimfire revolvers are versatile, reliable, easy-to-operate, and fun to shoot. A good .22 revolver will be considerably more accurate than 90% of the self-loading pistols you could buy. With a good a .22-caliber rimfire revolver you will learn sight alignment and trigger control. Plus you can practice with inexpensive ammunition.

The better .22 LR revolvers also hold their value. In particular, a Smith & Wesson Model 617 (or its predecessor, the Model 17, shown below) is a good investment. You could use your S&W wheelgun all your life and then pass it on to your kids. If you or your heirs ever wear out the barrel or cylinder, Smith & Wesson will replace the parts for free, forever. Think about that…

Smith Wesson 22 .22 LR Revolver model 63 17 617 wheelgun revolver cylinder

The Model 63 Kit Gun is a compact 6-shot (older) or 8-shot (newer) revolver. Older Model 63s are in high demand, so this is another Smith wheelgun that holds its value well…

Smith Wesson 22 .22 LR Revolver model 63 17 617 wheelgun revolver cylinder

Smith Wesson model 617 4 inchSmith & Wesson Model 617 — Smith’s Model 617 is extremely accurate, with a very crisp trigger (in single-action mode), and good sights. You can learn all the fundamentals with this ultra-reliable handgun, shooting inexpensive .22 LR ammo. The Model 617 is rugged, durable, and can give you a lifetime of shooting fun.

Once you have mastered the basics of shooting with a .22 LR, you can move on to larger caliber handguns suitable for self-defense. Below is a slide-show illustrating a S&W Model 617 ten-shot, with 6″ barrel. S&W also makes a 4″-barrel version of this revolver. (See: Shooting Demo Video with 4″ model 617.)

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April 4th, 2019

Bump Buster Recoil Reduction System for F-Open Rifles

Bret Solomon Speedy Thomas Gonzalez hydraulic recoil reduction F-Class F-Open accurateshooter.com

Many of our Forum members have expressed interest in a recoil-reduction system for prone F-Open competition rifles shooting heavy bullets from powerful cartridges. A .300 WSM shooing 200+ grain bullets can definitely take its toll over the course of a match. One system that has been used with considerable success is the hydraulic “Bump Buster” recoil system. This definitely reduces the pounding your shoulder gets during a long match. To illustrate this system, we’ve reprised an article on Brett Soloman’s F-Open rifle from a couple years back. Watch the Videos to see the Bump Buster in action.

Bret Solomon Speedy Thomas Gonzalez hydraulic recoil reduction F-Class F-Open accurateshooter.comOn his Facebook page, Hall-of-Fame shooter and ace gunsmith Thomas “Speedy” Gonzalez unveiled an impressive new F-Open rifle built for Bret Solomon. The rifle features Speedy’s new low-profile F-Class stock.

Bret’s gun is chambered for his 300 Solomon wildcat, shooting heavy 210gr bullets, so it can can be a real shoulder-buster, without some kind of buffer. The stock is fitted with a Ken Rucker’s Bump Buster hydraulic recoil reduction system to tame the recoil. The Bump Buster was originally designed for shotguns and hard-hitting, big game rifles. It is interesting to see this hydraulic buffer adapted to an F-Open rig.

Here you can see Bret shooting the gun, coached by Nancy Tompkins and Michele Gallagher:

Bret’s gun features a stainless Viper (Stiller) action, barrel tuner, and an innovative Speedy-crafted wood stock. Speedy says this stock design is all-new: “It is a true, low Center-of-Gravity F-Class stock, not a morphed Palma stock merely cut out on the bottom”. See all the details in this short video:

Stock Features: Glue-in or Bolt-In and Optional Carbon Pillars and Cooling Ports
Speedy explained the features of the new stock design: “Terry Leonard and I started working on an F-Class version of his stocks last year during the F-Class Nationals and came up with what he and I consider the first true low-CG stock in the sport. As you can see by the videos, there is very little torqueing of the stock during recoil. I add the carbon fiber tunnel underneath the forearms to save Terry some time. This bonds very well to his carbon fiber skeleton within the stock adding addition stiffness to the forearm to support the heavy barrels found on the F-Class rigs. We are playing with both glue-ins like we benchresters use and bolt-ins as well. The rifles on the videos are glue-ins. Bret just took delivery today of his first bolt-in employing carbon fiber pillars and the first Leonard stock ever to have cooling ports.”

Need for Recoil Reduction Follows F-Class Trend to Bigger Calibers and Heavier Bullets
In recent years we have seen F-Open competitors move to bigger calibers and heavier bullets in pursuit of higher BC. There is no free lunch however. Shooting a 210gr .30-caliber bullet is going to produce much more recoil than a 140gr 6.5mm projectile (when they are shot at similar velocities). Does this mean that more F-Open shooters will add hydraulic buffers to their rigs? Will a recoil-reduction system become “de rigueur” on F-Open rifles shooting heavy bullets?

Our friend Boyd Allen observes: “You may imagine that shooting a short magnum, or even a .284 Win with heavy bullets, involves a fair amount of recoil, and in the prone position this can be more than a little wearing. It can in fact beat you up over the course of a match. Some time back, Lou Murdica told me about having a hydraulic recoil absorbing device installed on one of his F-Class rifles, chambered in .300 WSM. Lou is shooting heavy (210-215gr) bullets so the recoil is stout. According to Lou, the hydraulic recoil-reduction system made all the difference.”

Story tip from Boyd Allen. We welcome reader submissions.
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April 2nd, 2019

Vortex C.O.B.R.A. Smart-Scope + Personal Assistant

Vortex April Fools video cobra c.o.b.r.a. smartscope voice activation humor joke video optics

Yesterday, April Fools Day, websites offered their best prank stories to readers. Our own 7.6 Creedmoor satire fooled more than a few folks it seems. There were some pretty good spoof videos as well, none better than this very funny production from our friends at Vortex Optics. The video showcase Vortex’s new C.O.B.R.A., a state-of-the-art smart-scope with the capabilities of an Alexa-type digital assistant. Watch the video — you’ll see that the clever C.O.B.R.A. has a mind of its own. Enjoy!

C.O.B.R.A. from Vortex
Introducing Vortex C.O.B.R.A., the Combat Optic Battle Ready Assistant, a virtual personal assistant fine-tuned with features specifically for hunters and shooters. Embedded into select Vortex riflescopes, you can now control your smart-scope with the power of your voice. Bore-sighting, dialing turrets, adjusting magnification, and setting your zero stop are just some of the hundreds of tasks that can be accomplished with simple hands free commands. Get C.O.B.R.A, and get your scope working for you!

Vortex April Fools video cobra c.o.b.r.a. smartscope voice activation humor joke video optics

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April 2nd, 2019

17 Mach 2 Straight-Pull Summit Rifle from Volquartsen

17 mach 2 .17 hm2 volquartsen summit

The 17 Mach 2 (aka “17 HM2″) is making a come-back. We’re glad. This high-velocity round fits actions and magazines designed for the .22 LR, so it’s an easy barrel-swap upgrade for most rimfire bolt-guns (semi-autos are more complicated). The 17 Mach 2 cartridge doesn’t deliver the velocity of the 17 HMR, but it is still way faster than a .22 LR. Expect 2000-2100 fps with 17 Mach 2 compared to 1250 fps for “High-Velocity” .22 LR ammo. And, importantly, 17 Mach 2 ammo is much less expensive than 17 HMR. If you shop around, you can get 50 rounds of 17 Mach 2 for about $6.50. That’s 40% cheaper than the average $11 price of 17 HMR — a significant savings!

17 Mach 2 Major Selling Points:

1. 60% more velocity than typical “High-Velocity” .22 LR ammo.
2. 40% less cost than average 17 HMR ammo.
3. 17 Mach 2 OAL is compatible with .22 LR receivers and magazines.

Toggle Bolt Volquartsen Summit in 17 HM2

It’s rare for us to see a new rimfire that we’d really like to own, but the new Summit from Volquartsen fits the bill. This versatile rifle features a cool, straight-pull toggle bolt, similar to those on elite Biathalon rifles. You can see how this gun shoots in this informative 22 Plinkster video:

22 Plinkster Tests Volquartsen Summit Rifle in 17 Mach 2

The 17 Mach 2 (17 HM2) is making a comeback. Now leading manufacturers are offering this efficient little rimfire cartridge in some nice rifles. Both Anschutz and Volquartsen will offer new 17 Mach 2 rifles in 2019. The Volquartsen Summit features a lightweight, carbon fiber-wrapped barrel threaded 1/2-28 for brakes or suppressors. The Summit boasts a nice 1.75-lb trigger pull. The Summit’s CNC-machined receiver features a +20 MOA Rail. NOTE: The video shows a silhouette-style laminated wood stock. However, the Summit comes standard with a composite Magpul stock that actually works better for shooting from a bench.

17 mach 2 .17 hm2 volquartsen summit

17 Mach 2 — Best Rimfire Bang for the Buck?

If you are looking for a capable, squirrel-busting round or a fun plinking round, you should definitely consider the 17 Mach 2, especially since CCI has committed to production of the little cartridge. CCI recently rolled out its “Gen 2″ 17 Mach 2 VNT Ammo with polymer tip (photo right).

17 mach 2 .17 hm2 volquartsen summit17 mach 2 .17 hm2 volquartsen summit
The 17 Mach 2 propels the same 17gr bullet as the 17 HMR, but the 17 Mach 2 runs roughly 20% slower — 2000-2100 fps vs. 2500 fps for the 17 HMR.

Considering that 17 HMR ammo is now running $10 to $12 a box, the 17 Mach 2 is an excellent value by comparison. When you consider overall “bang for the buck”, for many shooters, it makes sense to use the 17 Mach 2 rather than a 17 HMR. You save money, barrel life is a little longer, and the 17 Mach 2 is still a much more potent cartridge than the .22 LR. Check out this comparison, and note how the 17 Mach 2 has a much flatter trajectory than the .22 LR:

17 Mach 2 hm2 .22 LR comparison
Hornady’s 17 Mach 2 has a 2100 FPS muzzle velocity vs. 1255 FPS for “High-Velocity” .22 LR.

Permalink - Videos, Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 1 Comment »
March 31st, 2019

Frankford Arsenal Intellidropper Powder Scale/Dispenser Review

Frankford Arsenal intelli-dropper intellidropper powder measure scale dispenser test review video

Product Review by F-Class John
The Frankford Arsenal Platinum Series Intellidropper is the latest automated powder scale/dispenser to hit the market. This new-for-2019 machine offers a unique powder calibration mode and the first-ever, mobile APP-controlled powder dispensing system. With a retail price under $200, does the new Intellidropper live up to its promises? We’ll cover the key product features one by one, testing Frankford’s claims:

Feature 1 — Powder Calibration (Custom Profiles)
Feature 2 — Mobile APP Control with Load Database
Feature 3 — 1/10th of a Grain Accuracy

The $200 Intellidropper from Frankford Arsenal looks fairly similar to other electronic scale/dispensers. It has a digital touch-screen, a powder hopper, and a collection pan. But look a little deeper and you can see that it’s a whole lot more. Frankford Arsenal has brought new software technology to the table, with a Bluetooth controller/database APP. What’s more, this new machine has an innovative powder calibration mode, a software “brain” that helps the unit dispense powder with greater speed and precision.

As a technophile I find few things more annoying than technology developed or implemented for the wrong reasons or in the wrong way, so I was pretty apprehensive when I saw this was a ‘smart’ powder measure. I would soon be proved wrong. Unboxing was as easy as pulling out the unit, power cord, powder hopper, and a couple accessories. I simply plugged it in, leveled it on my work surface, allowed it to warm up, then calibrated it using the easy-to-use instructions. Once I was done with calibration, I could immediately begin dropping powder. It was then time to test Frankford’s claims about this new machine.

Frankford Arsenal intelli-dropper intellidropper powder measure scale dispenser test review video

Powder Calibration
First came the powder calibration mode. Zero the tray, click the “Powder Cal” button and the machine instantly begins to dispense your powder at various rates. As it does this the machine’s “brain” records its ability to flow/dispense the powder most efficiently. In just a few minutes the unit knew the fastest and most consistent way to drop that particular powder. The beauty of this system is that it’s so fast and easy to use that I can picture myself using this anytime I change powder without giving it a second thought. As easy as the calibration was, I was left wondering if it really made a difference. A test of calibrated versus non-calibrated throws showed an average of 22 seconds for calibrated throws vs. nearly 40 seconds non-calibrated. This demonstrated a major improvement with Frankford’s powder calibration system. Once I was done with the powder calibration it came time to add the APP.

Intellidropper Controller APP — How It Works
Frankford offers Intellidropper APPs for both iOS (Apple) and Android phones. A quick search in the iOS and Android APP stores turned up the free Intellidropper APPs. Once downloaded and installed, the APP activated easily and then automatically connected to my Intellidropper unit. Simply ensure your Bluetooth is turned on and that’s it. There was no pairing or manual connections necessary, just open the APP, count to three and now you can control your unit from your phone or tablet. I was expecting this to be a novelty that did nothing more than let me replace the touchpad on the unit but there’s a lot more to it than that.

Touch the menu button at the bottom and now you can enter as many loads as you want including caliber, bullet, powder, powder charge, OAL, firearm, primer and brass used. This allows you to create a database of all your favorite cartridge types, bullets, and powders. For example you could have 10 different .308 Win loads, all with different bullets and/or powders. Or you could have 10 different cartridge types with many different loads for each. The software remembers the powder type and charge weight. Loads from the database can be instantly sent to the unit, which will then rapidly dispense the exact charge weight the APP commands. I found this system provides just enough options to work efficiently without cluttering it up with needless functions. It really is the right balance of style and substance that made this a joy to use and kept me wanting to play with it more. Frankford Arsenal’s tech team told us that Frankford is committed to keeping the firmware, software, and APP updated over time. This should ensure that you can use this unit for many years to come.

WARNING: The Intellidropper is smart but it does NOT know what powder the human user has poured into the hopper! You obviously need to confirm you have the correct powder in the hopper before you send a command from the APP!

Powder Weighing Precision — The Tenth of a Grain Standard
Like the RCBS ChargeMaster, the Intellidropper is really two machines in one — a powder dispenser AND a SCALE that weighs the dispensed powder. Even with its cool APP and fast dispensing speed, to be a winner, the Intellidropper must be able to WEIGH CHARGES accurately and repeatedly. Frankford Arsenal claims this machine can weigh charges with ± 1/10th of a grain accuracy. With that in mind, I put it to the test. After giving the unit the recommended 15-minute warm-up, I ran twenty H4350 loads with a target weight of 50.8 grains. The machine was fast — the average drop time was just 22 seconds.

Frankford Arsenal intelli-dropper intellidropper powder measure scale dispenser test review video

How did the Intellidropper do? After each of the twenty loads was dispensed, I then double-checked the actual charge weight, using a $600+ lab-quality scale. As confirmed with the lab scale, every one of the 20 Intellidropper-thrown charges was within the stated variance, i.e. plus or minus one-tenth of a grain. Not only that but I found the average drop time to be only 22 seconds with H4530. It may vary with other types of powders, but I expect that drop time to stay fairly consistent when calibrated correctly.

CONCLUSION: Intellidropper is Fast, Accurate, and Software Works Well
The Frankford Arsenal Intellidropper is an impressive, affordable Scale/Dispenser that throws charges accurately and consistently. It has a very handy software APP and more practical features than anything else out there. In the world of sub-$300 powder measures, this $200 machine seems to have hit a home run — this machine demands your serious attention. I try to review products strictly based on the manufacturers’ claims and how they deliver on them. In the case of the Frankford Arsenal Intellidropper, it delivers on those promises. Of course, the $200 Intellidropper won’t replace a Prometheus — it is not for handloaders who demand to measure each charge down to the kernel. But the Intellidropper certainly doesn’t claim single-kernel accuracy, and it costs a fraction of the Prometheus.

Want More Info? This UltimateReloader.com Video reviews the Intellidropper’s key features:

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March 31st, 2019

Video Takes You Inside Accuracy International Arms Factory

accuracy international suv AT

accuracy international suv ATWho wouldn’t like a look inside the Accuracy International (AI) factory in England? Thanks to The Telegraph, a British media outlet, you can do just that. The Telegraph got its cameras inside AI’s production facility “at a discreet location on the outskirts of Portsmouth”.

Accuracy International has introduced a number of new models in the past couple of years, including the modular, multi-caliber AXMC Rifle System, and the ATAICS Chassis for the Remington M700. Like the AI PSR system, the AXMC can be user-configured to shoot three different calibers: .308/7.62 NATO, .300 Winchester Magnum and .338 Lapua Magnum.

Watch the video below. NOTE — because this video is hosted in the UK, it may take a while to load while the digital packets swim across the Atlantic ocean.

The AXMC is AI’s multi-caliber sniper rifle. Versatility is the name of the game…
accuracy international suv AT

This Accuracy International AT (on gimbaled mount) is not your average SUV Accessory.
accuracy international suv AT

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March 30th, 2019

6-6.5×47 vs. Milk Jug at 1000 Yards in Crazy Winds

This website focuses on rifle accuracy and precision — normally indicated by small groups and high scores. But sometimes reactive targets are fun too — particularly when you can hit them at very long range. Here’s a video of a 6-6.5×47 Lapua hitting a milk jug at 1000 yards. This video was filmed during the Long Range Shooters of Utah 1000-Yard Milk Jug Challenge a while back. A remote camera shows a 95gr Sierra MatchKing penetrating a filled jug. The jug was hit with the fifth shot — you can see the fluid leaking out at 0:57. NOTE: Because the remote camera is positioned well off to the side, the jug-penetrating shot appears to impact low and slightly right (as seen in the inset close-up frame). The jug is actually suspended in front of the white square, and that’s where the fifth shot went, right through the bottom section of the jug.

Congrats to Mr. Clint Bryant of Green River, Wyoming for hitting the jug in challenging conditions. Clint had to dial 11 minutes of windage to compensate for a strong cross-wind (see 2:30 time-mark). Clint’s 6-6.5×47 cartridge is a variant of the 6.5×47 Lapua cartridge, necked down to 6mm. This 6-6.5×47 case drives the 95gr SMKs at 3100 FPS, making for a very effective (and accurate) coyote cartridge. Rick’s rifle was a Savage Model 12, with 30″ barrel, in an aftermarket stock, topped by a Leupold scope.

Here is the parent case, the 6.5×47 Lapua:

6.5x47 Lapua

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March 26th, 2019

Angular Measurement — Mil vs. MOA — What You Need to Know

Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series
Visit PrecisionRifleBlog.com for a discussion of MIL vs. MOA.

Many guys getting started in long range shooting are confused about what kind of scope they should buy — specifically whether it should have MIL-based clicks or MOA-based clicks. Before you can make that decision, you need to understand the terminology. This article, with a video by Bryan Litz, explains MILS and MOA so you can choose the right type of scope for your intended application.

This March-FX 5-40x56mm Tactical FFP scope features 0.05 MIL Clicks.
Mil MOA reticle ranging PRS tactical minute angle precision rifle series

You probably know that MOA stands for “Minute of Angle” (or more precisely “minute of arc”), but could you define the terms “Milrad” or “MIL”? In his latest video, Bryan Litz of Applied Ballitics explains MOA and MILs (short for “milliradians”). Bryan defines those terms and explains how they are used. One MOA is an angular measurement (1/60th of one degree) that subtends 1.047″ at 100 yards. One MIL (i.e. one milliradian) subtends 1/10th meter at 100 meters; that means that 0.1 Mil is one centimeter (1 cm) at 100 meters. Is one angular measurement system better than another? Not necessarily… Bryan explains that Mildot scopes may be handy for ranging, but scopes with MOA-based clicks work just fine for precision work at known distances. Also because one MOA is almost exactly one inch at 100 yards, the MOA system is convenient for expressing a rifle’s accuracy. By common parlance, a “half-MOA” rifle can shoot groups that are 1/2-inch (or smaller) at 100 yards.

What is a “Minute” of Angle?
When talking about angular degrees, a “minute” is simply 1/60th. So a “Minute of Angle” is simply 1/60th of one degree of a central angle, measured either up and down (for elevation) or side to side (for windage). At 100 yards, 1 MOA equals 1.047″ on the target. This is often rounded to one inch for simplicity. Say, for example, you click up 1 MOA (four clicks on a 1/4-MOA scope). That is roughly 1 inch at 100 yards, or roughly 4 inches at 400 yards, since the target area measured by an MOA subtension increases with the distance.

one MOA minute of angle diagram

MIL vs. MOA for Target Ranging
MIL or MOA — which angular measuring system is better for target ranging (and hold-offs)? In a recent article on his PrecisionRifleBlog.com website, Cal Zant tackles that question. Analyzing the pros and cons of each, Zant concludes that both systems work well, provided you have compatible click values on your scope. Zant does note that a 1/4 MOA division is “slightly more precise” than 1/10th mil, but that’s really not a big deal: “Technically, 1/4 MOA clicks provide a little finer adjustments than 1/10 MIL. This difference is very slight… it only equates to 0.1″ difference in adjustments at 100 yards or 1″ at 1,000 yards[.]” Zant adds that, in practical terms, both 1/4-MOA clicks and 1/10th-MIL clicks work well in the field: “Most shooters agree that 1/4 MOA or 1/10 MIL are both right around that sweet spot.”

READ MIL vs. MOA Cal Zant Article.

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March 25th, 2019

What You Need to Know About Primers — Explained by an Expert

Primer Priming Tool Magnum primers foil anvil primer construction reloading powder CCI
Winchester Pistol Primers on bench. Photo courtesy UltimateReloader.com.

There is an excellent article about primers on the Shooting Times website. We strongly recommend you read Mysteries And Misconceptions Of The All-Important Primer, written by Allan Jones. Mr. Jones is a bona fide expert — he served as the manager of technical publications for CCI Ammunition and Speer Bullets and Jones authored three editions of the Speer Reloading Manual.

» READ Full Primer “Mysteries and Misconceptions” Article

This authoritative Shooting Times article explains the fine points of primer design and construction. Jones also reveals some little-known facts about primers and he corrects common misconceptions. Here are some highlights from the article:

Primer Priming Tool Magnum primers foil anvil primer construction reloading powder CCISize Matters
Useful Trivia — even though Small Rifle and Small Pistol primer pockets share the same depth specification, Large Rifle and Large Pistol primers do not. The standard pocket for a Large Pistol primer is somewhat shallower than its Large Rifle counterpart, specifically, 0.008 to 0.009 inch less.

Magnum Primers
There are two ways to make a Magnum primer — either use more of the standard chemical mix to provide a longer-burning flame or change the mix to one with more aggressive burn characteristics. Prior to 1989, CCI used the first option in Magnum Rifle primers. After that, we switched to a mix optimized for spherical propellants that produced a 24% increase in flame temperature and a 16% boost in gas volume.

Foiled Again
Most component primers have a little disk of paper between the anvil and the priming mix. It is called “foil paper” not because it’s made of foil but because it replaces the true metal foil used to seal early percussion caps. The reason this little disk exists is strictly a manufacturing convenience. Wet primer pellets are smaller than the inside diameter of the cup when inserted and must be compacted to achieve their proper diameter and height. Without the foil paper, the wet mix would stick to the compaction pins and jam up the assembly process.

Read Full Primer Story on ShootingTimes.com:
https://www.shootingtimes.com/editorial/ammunition_st_mamotaip_200909/100079

VIDEOS about PRIMERS
Here are two videos that offer some good, basic information on primers:

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March 25th, 2019

Revolver Showdown — Miculek Shoots S&W, Colt, & Ruger

Jerry Miculek smith wesson colt python wheelgun ruger revolver showdown
Hornady sponsored shooter Jerry Miculek — Yamil Sued Photo.

If you are considering acquiring a revolver for fun shooting, self-defense, or competition, you should definitely watch this YouTube video. In this 23-minute presentation, legendary shooter Jerry Miculek puts three .357/.38 SPL wheelguns through their paces. Jerry, one of the greatest revolver shooters in history, hosts a “Revolver Showdown” with three popular wheelguns: 1) S&W L frame (3″ bbl); 2) Colt Python (6″ bbl); and 3) Ruger Speed Six (2.75″ bbl).

Smith & Wesson Model 686 Plus, L-Frame, 7-rd .357 Magnum/38 SPL, 3″ Barrel.
Jerry Miculek Revolver showdown comparison S&W Colt Ruger

Colt Python (Nickel), 6-rd .357 Magnum/38 SPL, 6″ Barrel.
Jerry Miculek Revolver showdown comparison S&W Colt Ruger

Ruger Speed Six, 6-rd .357 Magnum/38 SPL, 3″ Barrel.
Jerry Miculek Revolver showdown comparison S&W Colt Ruger

Jerry Miculek Revolver showdown comparison S&W Colt RugerTesting at 10 Yards and 50 Yards
In the video, Jerry shoots all three revolvers rapid-fire, double-action at 10 yards. Then he shoots the three guns single-action, slow-fire at 50 yards (starting at time mark 7:19).

After his range session, Jerry examines nine medium frame revolvers, comparing and contrasting design features. Jerry considers these factors:

1. Accuracy
2. Balance and Handling
3. Speed and Sureness of Trigger Return (watch video at 3:45″ re Colt.)
4. Reliability
5. Barrel Twist Rate
6. Strength of Construction/Durability

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March 24th, 2019

Start Your Next AR Gas Gun Build with $49.99 PSA Lower

AR-15 AR AR16 bargain discount stripped lower value price Palmetto armory

Do you need a quality, affordable lower for your next black gun build? Here’s one of the best deals we’d found. Palmetto State Armory (PSA) now has stripped AR15 lowers for just $49.99. With this lower as the core, you can build up your AR for any discipline you choose: 3-Gun rifle, competition service rifle, varmint rifle, or even “race gun” for the popular PRS Gas Gun Series (see below).

These forged PSA lowers are quality-made using 7075-T6 Aluminum. Finish is Black Hardcoat Anodized per MIL-8625 Type 3 class 2.

PRS Gas Gun Series — What You Need to Know

PRS Gas Gun Series Basics — How to Get Involved

Capitalizing on the success of the bolt-gun competitions, the PRS runs a Gas Gun series for semi-auto rifles such as AR15s and AR10s. The inaugural 2017 PRS Gas Gun Series competition took place February 17-19, 2017 at the CORE Shooting Solutions range in Baker, Florida. Now there are PRS Gas Gun Matches around the country.

PRS Gas Gun Series Rules
For the new PRS “Gasser” Competition, the PRS developed rules on gun types, scoring, match timing, penalties, safety and other key topics. CLICK HERE for Full PRS Gas Gun Series Rules.

Open Division: The Open Division rifles will not exceed a caliber of .30 or a velocity of 3,200 fps. A match DQ will result any rounds over the speed limit of 3,200 fps (+/- 32 fps for environmental factors and equipment discrepancies). Match Officials may request at any point during a match that a competitor fire their rifle through chronograph. If the bullet exceeds the 3,200 fps speed limit, the shooter will receive an automatic match DQ.

Tactical Light Division: Intended to allow competitors the opportunity tocompete using traditional military and law enforcement caliber. This promotes Active Duty military and law enforcement competitors use of their Service and Department-issued rifles. Tactical Light Division rifles are restricted to 5.56 NATO/.223 Remington calibers only. Bullet weight cannot exceed 77 grains and muzzle velocity cannot exceed 3,000 fps.

Shooting Sports USA interviewed PRS President Shawn Wiseman:

SSUSA: What will be the format of the PRS Gas Gun Series matches?
Wiseman: The matches will be a two-day format with 8 to 10 stages per day. There are three Divisions: Tactical Light for 5.56x45mm NATO/.223 Rem. rifles; Tactical Heavy for 7.62x51mm NATO/.308 Win.; and Open for everything else up to .30 cal. The maximum distance will be 800 yards.

SSUSA: What guns do you expect to be popular?
Wiseman: In the Open Division, I expect to see a lot of 6.5 Creedmoors for two main reasons; it’s an inherently accurate cartridge and Hornady makes great ammo for the folks that aren’t into reloading. I think the Tactical Light Division will probably be the most popular. It is hard to say specifically what rifles will be the most popular but there are a few AR companies that are known for the accuracy. Armalite, GA Precision, LaRue and Seekins will all be very popular rifles in this Series. I think we will continue to see high-end optics with 5X to 6X zoom range on the rifles. Bushnell, Kahles, Leupold, Nightforce and Vortex will continue to be the most popular.

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March 23rd, 2019

Suppressor Facts Revealed — How They Work

Suppressor silencer NSSF infographic decibel noise reduction moderator fact sheet

Curious about suppressors (aka “silencers”, “moderators”, or “cans”)? Below you’ll find an informative NSSF Infographic that covers the history, legal status, design, and operation of modern-day suppressors.

Here’s a cool video showing how suppressors work. This video features see-through rifle suppressors filmed with ultra-high-speed (110,000 frame per second) cameras. When played back in super-slow-motion, you can see the flame propagate through the suppressor and the bullet move through each baffle before it exists the muzzle. Check it out!

See Through Suppressor in Super Slow Motion (110,000 fps) — Click Arrow to Watch:

Suppressor Facts — What You Need to Know

In this infographic, the NSSF provides the history, specifications, benefits and uses of firearm suppressors. Don’t suppress your knowledge!

Suppressors reduce gunfire sound levels by using baffles that contain expanding gasses exiting a firearm’s muzzle when ammo is discharged. Suppressors are similar to car mufflers that were, in fact, developed in parallel by the same inventor in the early 1900s. Well-designed suppressors typically reduce the gun sound levels by 30-35 decibels (dB). Suppressors are becoming more popular even though it still takes many months to get approved. In fact, the number of suppressors registered with the ATF grew by over 1 million from 2011 to 2017. That’s a 355% increase.

Suppressor silencer NSSF infographic decibel noise reduction moderator fact sheet

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March 22nd, 2019

Montana Magic — 6BR Ackley Shoots Sub-Quarter-MOA at 1000

BAT Machine neuvo benchrest rifle action krieger barrel montana deep creek tom mousel Alex Wheeler
Looking 1000 yards downrange at the Deep Creek Range outside Missoula, Montana.

On Facebook recently, we saw an eye-catching rifle. Owned by top 1000-yard competitor (and past IBS Champ) Tom Mousel, this rifle was smithed by Alex Wheeler of Wheeler Accuracy. This rig features the McMillan-crafted Wheeler LRB stock with adjustable keel. It also has BAT Machine’s very impressive new Neuvo LR (aka “Neuvo M”) action, serial number LR0001. The Neuvo LR has some important design features — horizontal lug orientation, full-diameter bolt body, and advanced fire control system. More about those features below.

BAT Machine neuvo benchrest rifle action krieger barrel montana deep creek tom mousel Alex Wheeler

This gun is a shooter. Tom has already shot a 1.5″ four-shot group at 1000 yards. How does he do that? First you need a great barrel, great bullets, and superior hand-loading skills. But then it comes down to great gun-handling. You can see that in the video below. NOTE to ALL Long-Range Benchrest shooters — Watch this video! You’ll definitely learn from watching Tom shoot — he’s one of the best in the business.

Tom Mousel shoots 1000-yard ladder test with first-released Neuvo LR action, SN LR0001.
Rifle chambering is 6BR Ackley (6BRA) in 28″ Krieger barrel.

Rifle Components and Build INFO:
This rifle has a BAT Neuvo LR (aka Neuvo “M”) action glued and screwed into the LRB stock using a special bedding block, a Boyd Allen concept that Tom has requested to use on every future build. The 28″ Krieger 1:8″-twist HV barrel was indexed using a little different method than most use. It is “panning out well” says Alex, who adds: “So far it has shot [multiple low ones] with two barrels and three different bullet types. This rifle is definitely one of the better shooters I have seen.” We’d agree — owner Tom Mousel has had a 1.5″ 4-shot group at 1000 yards in testing, plus some “zero” 3-shot groups at 100 yards.

Chambering is the 6mmBR Ackley (6BRA). The stock is a Wheeler/McMillan LRB stock with vivid orange and black paint job. It features an adjustable keel in the rear. Trigger is a Bix N Andy unit from Bullets.com.

BAT Machine neuvo benchrest rifle action krieger barrel montana deep creek tom mousel Alex Wheeler
This BAT Neuvo LR action is a Left-loading Drop Port. Cartridges eject out the bottom of the action.

BAT Machine Neuvo Long Range “M” Action
This is the “Long Range” version of the BAT Neuvo. Dwight Scott and Chris Harris were the original inspiration. I worked with Chris to come up with a version for long range. The main differences for the LR Neuvo (compared to the shorter Neuvo) are this has integral lug and rail, with flat bottom and sides for better bedding. The BAT Neuvo LR is available in drop port, dual port, and single port as well as magnum.

BAT Machine neuvo benchrest rifle action krieger barrel montana deep creek tom mousel Alex Wheeler

Take a look at the bolt. Notice the lug orientation and full diameter bolt body. There are no bolt raceways in the action and the two lugs sit HORIZONTALLY when the bolt is closed — that’s different than the vast majority of other two-lug actions.

Alex Wheeler says the Neuvo is a winner. He thinks some of the action’s design features really do contribute to enhanced accuracy: “The … fire control (firing pin assembly) carries a lot of energy and has a very “clean” release. This is an excellent design with many small details that combine to deliver superior function. In addition, the full-diameter bolt can be fitted tighter than one with lugways. Also the horizontal lugs may be why we see less vertical stringing in the groups. They are timed perfectly as well.”

BAT Machine neuvo benchrest rifle action krieger barrel montana deep creek tom mousel Alex Wheeler

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March 22nd, 2019

Cantastic Video — How a Suppressor is Constructed

SilencerCo suppressor manufacturing production video Assembly

Watch this video to see how a sound suppressor (aka “silencer”, “moderator”, or “can”) is constructed, start to finish. It’s more complicated than you might expect — there are quite a few stages in the process. The video below shows the fabrication of a SilencerCo Octane 45 suppressor:

SilencerCo writes: “What, exactly, goes into making a silencer? It may be more than you’d expect. From cutting metal to chemical baths, to extensive quality control every step of the way, our streamlined process is more than just a few steps. Watch our newest video, HOW IT’S MADE: Octane 45, to catch a glimpse behind SilencerCo’s doors.”

SilencerCo suppressor
Photo courtesy UltimateReloader.com.

suppressor fact and fiction moderator silencer

How Loud Are Unsuppressed Rifles?
Firearms Are Loud — 140 dB to 175 dB. ASHA explains: “Almost all firearms create noise that is over the 140-dB level. Exposure to noise greater than 140 dB can permanently damage hearing. A small .22-caliber rifle can produce noise around 140 dB, while big-bore rifles and pistols can produce sound over 175 dB. Firing guns in a place where sounds can reverberate, or bounce off walls and other structures, can make noises louder and increase the risk of hearing loss. Also, adding muzzle brakes or other modifications can make the firearm louder. People who do not wear hearing protection while shooting can suffer a severe hearing loss with as little as one shot[.]” Source: ASHA, Recreational Firearm Noise Exposure.

How Much Does a Good Suppressor Really Reduce Firearm Sound Levels?
That depends on the rifle, the cartridge, and the effectiveness of the suppressor. American Hunter explains: “Suppressors retard the speed of propellant gases from the cartridge that rapidly expand and rush out of the barrel. It’s these gases that produce the loud boom that’s heard for miles. A suppressor’s series of internal baffles slows these gases so they are not all released at once, thereby muffling the sound.” Many good commercial suppressors can achieve 30-35 dB sound suppression. However, Zak Smith of Thunder Beast Arms says: “There are a bunch of manufacturers who publish values that are not reproducible, or use an ad-hoc test instead of a mil-spec test. In many cases we’ve tested the exact same suppressors they’ve advertised with 30-40 dB reductions and found they are actually in the high 20s instead.”

Again, for this reason, we recommend that hunters use ear protection, such as electronic muffs, even when shooting suppressed.

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March 21st, 2019

Proper Sight Picture with Various Types of Sighting Systems

NRA sight picture alignment video

As part of the NRA Mentor Program, the NRA offers a helpful video about using sights. This covers all types of sighting systems — blade sights, aperture sights, V-notch sights, red dot sights, shotgun bead sights, and telescopic sights with reticles. For new shooters, this video can be helpful — it explains sight basics in very clear and comprehensible terms. And even for experienced shooters, this can provide some helpful tips on sight alignment, particularly when shooting pistols.

Additional information about using sights is contained in the NRA’s free Guide for New Shooters. This helpful 14-page digital publication provides the key firearms safety rules, explains range etiquette, and even has a section on gun cleaning. CLICK HERE to download Guide for New Shooters.

NRA sight picture alignment video

Training With Lasers — Trigger Control
Training with laser sights helps diagnose and improve trigger control errors by showcasing the importance of “surprise break” and follow-through. Working with gun-mounted lasers, which put a red or green dot right on the target, can quickly diagnose errors such as recoil anticipation, jerking the trigger, and breaking the wrist. This video shows how handgunners can use pistol-mounted lasers to correct bad habits and shoot more consistently.

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March 19th, 2019

We’re Gobsmacked — Google Invites Gun Book Author to Talk

Chris Cheng shoot to win book interview

Chris Cheng, Top Shot TV Season 4 Champion, worked at Google from 2007-2012. A self-taught amateur turned pro, he beat 17 competitors to win the title of Top Shot, a $100,000 grand prize, and a professional marksmanship contract with Bass Pro Shops. After his Top Shot success, Cheng left Google to pursue a new career in the firearms industry. He is the author of Shoot To Win, now in its Second Edition (2018). The book is available from Amazon for $19.99 (or $14.99 Kindle). You can also get an eBook version for $14.95 through Google Play with a free sample.

What is pretty remarkable, given the current state of “political correctness” in our nation is that Google invited Cheng to discuss his book at a Google Authors event. Here is the video of that interview.

Chris explains: “Google invited me back to discuss the 2nd Edition of my book Shoot to Win and it was an honor to become a two-time Google @Authors talk guest.

Given the political climate and anti-conservative accusations levied on Google and other tech companies it was notable I got invited. But more notable was that Google employees voted on authors they wanted to come speak and my name floated to the top. It goes to show that Google is trying to balance things out and bring more divergent perspectives and increase intellectual diversity.

In the talk we discussed sacrifice, hard work, and the focus required to win at life. We also discussed my advocacy for gun rights, gay rights, and freedom and how there are folks who want gay people and gun people to not exist on this Earth.

The only way we’re going to find our way out is if we have more respectable, civil dialogue to find solutions. It isn’t about agreeing on everything, but finding common ground and moving quickly where we agree.”

Chris Cheng shoot to win book interview

After winning the Top Shot Season 4 title, Chris Cheng left his job at Google to pursue a new career in the firearms industry. Cheng now travels the country speaking professionally and sharing his passion for the shooting sports. He is a Certified Pistol, Rifle, and Shotgun Instructor. Cheng also serves as a Member of the NSSF’s Outreach and Inclusion Committee where he represents LGBT and Asian interests.

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