June 21st, 2017

Get a 22-Gun Safe for Under $350.00 at Wally World

Walmart gun safe $344 Stack-On

We know some of our readers still don’t own a gun safe, even a small one. We’ll now there’s no excuse. Here’s a killer deal on a Stack-On gun vault at WalMart. This 22-gun safe can’t compare to a large, heavy-gauge $1500+ safe, but it will be worlds better than storing your firearms under the bed or in a closet. Bottom line, your firearms need to be locked up when not in use. Priced at just $344.97 this is a great deal. And the shipping charge is just another $9.99.

Measuring 55″ tall x 26.8″ wide x 17.6″ deep, this Stack-On safe is rated for 22 long guns up to 54″ tall. In reality, you’ll be lucky to fit a 13-14 scoped rifles comfortably in this safe, but that’s enough for many guys. This is also a good “second safe” for your loading room or bedroom.

CLICK HERE to Go to Product Description Page

Permalink Gear Review, Hot Deals No Comments »
June 20th, 2017

Tactical Twins: Micarta-Stocked PRS Rigs for SFC Brandon Green

SFC Brandon Green PRS Rifle Micarta Foundation Stocks

What does a two-time High Power National Champion choose for PRS comps? A set of twins. Twin rifles that is. SFC Brandon Green of the USAMU is one of America’s best marksmen. He’s excelled in Service Rifle and High Power disciplines, and now he’s getting very serious about the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brandon recently took delivery of “Twins” — two impressive rifles optimized for PRS competition. Green told us: “The Twins are ready for business! The silver one is a 6XC and the black one is a 6.5×47 Lapua”. Both rifles feature Impact Precision actions (with AICS-type mags), 24″ Proof stainless barrels, and Fat Bastard muzzle brakes. Rifle work was done by Stuteville Precision (Wade Stuteville) and Exodus Rifles (Joe Walls).

SFC Brandon Green PRS Rifle Micarta Foundation Stocks
In the 6XC, Brandon runs Berger 105gr VLDs in Norma 6XC brass. For the 6.5×47 Lapua he shoots 140gr Berger Hybrids or 143gr Hornady ELD-Xs in Lapua brass. Both rifles have stainless steel Proof barrels, but the 6.5x47L has a matte black Cerakote finish.

Brandon loves his new Twins. He said he likes the “feel” of the guns with the Foundation stocks: “These rifles weigh around 17 pounds with optics. They feel very solid under recoil — without the ‘tuning fork’ vibration you can get with a metal-chassis gun. They feel like a good wood-stocked gun, but the material is stronger and more rigid than wood. I’ve heard that guys are having success with these Foundation stocks with the actions installed without pillars or conventional bedding.” Currently Brandon is running both guns without action-screw pillars. He did have one skim-bedded, but he doesn’t think that was really needed. “Both rifles hammer now”, Brandon tells us.

Green Runs Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27x56mm FFP scopes on both rifles:
SFC Brandon Green PRS Rifle Micarta Foundation Stocks

High-Tech Micarta Stock Material
At first glance, those stocks may look like wood, but they are actually a special “Micarta” material that is strong, durable, and stable. Micarta, often used for knife handles, is a “a brand name for composites of fiberglass, carbon fiber, or other fabric in a thermosetting plastic.” The stock-maker, Foundation Stocks, says Micarta offers some distinct advantages over laminated wood or conventional fiberglass: “The solid block of material gives us a dense, homogenous material that is absent of any voids or air pockets commonly found in composite stocks. The high compression strength of the material allows us to build an action/DBM specific stock that requires no bedding or pillars. The material is very durable and stable in extreme environments. We use advanced CAD software to design and model our stocks, working in conjunction with action manufacturers and rifle builders to provide exact fitment.”

Here is a close-up of a Foundation Stock showing the distinctive Micarta texture:
SFC Brandon Green PRS Rifle Micarta Foundation Stocks

Tactical Competition vs. NRA High Power Competition
Brandon says PRS competition is tough: “PRS can be pretty humbling, but it’s been a lot of fun and a great challenge. For a shooter (like me) with a Service Rifle/High Power background, the variations in stages combined with the time limits can be very challenging. And the unusual shooting positions put a new spin on things. PRS is definitely a different ball game, but I really enjoy it. After the National Championships this summer I hope to shoot three or four PRS matches in September and October.”

SFC Brandon Green 2015 High Power National Championship
SFC Brandon Green honored as the 2015 High Power National Champion.

Life before the Twins… Here is Brandon, with his previous PRS rig, at the MasterPiece Arms Precision Rifle Shootout, a PRS event at the CORE Shooting Solutions Range in Florida:

SFC Brandon Green PRS Rifle Micarta Foundation Stocks

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing, Tactical 12 Comments »
June 17th, 2017

Titan Modular Gun Vault from SnapSafe

modular bolt gun safe snapsafe Zanotti

snapsafe gunsafeGenerally you want the biggest, heaviest gunsafe you can afford. However, for many gun owners, a 1000+ pound behemoth is impractical. For those who relocate frequently for their jobs, or who live up many flights of stairs, it is more practical to have a safe that breaks down into separate pieces for transport. In our Guide to Gunsafes, we reviewed the Zanotti Safe, a quality modular safe that breaks down into smaller, lighter components. Now there is a another modular safe that competes with the Zanotti. Snapsafe’s Titan Modular Safe ships in three (3) flat boxes. Simply unpack the components and assemble the 330-lb. Titan on-site in about 30 minutes without tools.

Watch video to see how the SnapSafe Titan can be assembled without tools:

The SnapSafe™ Titan holds 12+ rifles, weighs 375 lbs. assembled, and measures 59” H x 22” W x 17.5”. Side panels are 9 gauge steel and the door is 3/16” steel secured by eight 1″-diameter chrome steel live locking bolts. SnapSafe claims that its patented structure can be stronger than conventional welded construction. You can choose either SecuRam™ Digital Lock or a mechanical lock. The Titan comes with fire-sealing gaskets lining the door frame. These gaskets, combined with ceramic wool blankets in the walls provide a claimed one hour of fire protection against temperatures up to 2300ºF.

SnapSafe sells its Titan 12+ long-gun capacity safe for $1249.00 delivered. There are also larger-capacity modular safes — the $1648.00 Super Titan (24 gun capacity), and the massive $1999.00 Super Titan XL (36 gun capacity). All prices include shipping to the lower 48 states.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review No Comments »
June 16th, 2017

Lithgow LA101 — Tack-Driving .22 LR Bolt Action from Australia

lithgow LA101 crossover .22LR rimfire rifle varmint stock
Along with .22 LR, the LA101 is offered in .22 WMR and 17 HMR chamberings.

There’s an impressive bolt-action rimfire rifle built in Australia, the LA101 Crossover from Lithgow Arms. Imported by Legacy Sports Int’l, this relatively new rimfire rifle offers a smooth-running action, excellent accuracy, a crisp trigger, and a durable, Cerakote finish.

YouTube host 22Plinkster recently tested the LA101 in .22 LR, and found that it delivered very impressive accuracy. He recorded multiple “one-ragged-hole” groups at 50 yards (see video below). Even at 100 yards, the LA101 was shooting close to 1 MOA with relatively inexpensive ammo. This is an impressive rifle, as it should be, with a $1000+ price tag. MSRP is $1079.00 USD (synthetic), $1215.00 USD (laminate).

22Plinkster writes: “I have shot a lot of .22 LR bolt rifles in my day, but this one, is a nail driver!” After testing, he concluded that the LA101 was “the most accurate bolt rifle I own”. He reports the stock is very comfortable for off-hand shooting as well as bench work.

LA101 Crossover Features and Specifications
The Lithgow Arms LA101 Crossover features a 3-lug, 60°-throw action with rear-locking bolt. It is available in both right-hand and left-hand versions, with a very good factory trigger advertised at 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg). Note — testers report report the trigger feels lighter. Choose between a fiberglass-reinforced polymer stock, Walnut, or laminated wood stocks. This rifle is offered in three rimfire chamberings: .22 LR, .22 WMR, and 17 HMR. The .22-cal barrels are hammer-forged while the 17 HMR barrel is button-broached. Action and barrels are Cerakote finished. The Lithgow LA101 can use CZ 452/455 5-round and 10-round magazines.

lithgow LA101 crossover .22LR rimfire rifle varmint stock

The LA101 is offered with choice of wood or synthetic stocks, all of which feature a straight, lower rear section that works well in rear bags:

lithgow LA101 crossover .22LR rimfire rifle varmint stock

Here is another, lengthy LA101 review, done in Australia a couple years back. The reviewer field-tests a composite-stocked Lithgow LA101 with a wide variety of .22 LR ammunition. Warning: Starts with loud, annoying music — you may want to turn down your speakers:

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, New Product 4 Comments »
June 14th, 2017

Make Your Own Lanolin-Based Case Lube

DIY yourself lanolin case lube lubricant One Shot Ultimate Reloader Gavin Gear 6.5 Guys

In the YouTube video embedded below, our friend Gavin Gear of UltimateReloader.com shows who to make your own case lube using simple, inexpensive ingredients. As recommended by the 6.5 Guys, this Liquid Lanolin + Isopropyl Alchohol mix works well and is very cost-effective. You can make a pint of this home-brew Lanolin case lube for a fraction of the price of commercial aerosol spray lubes.

Complete Case Lube Instructions on UltimateReloader.com »

Gavin tells us: “Per the 65guys instructions, I ordered the same components and spray bottles, and these worked out great”:

1. Swan Isopropyl Alcohol, 99%, Pint, 16 Ounce (2-pack)
2. Home Health Liquid Lanolin, 4 Ounce
3. Chemical Guys ACC_121.16HD-3PK Chem. Resistant Heavy Duty Bottle/Sprayer (16 oz.)

Gavin describes the exact mixing process on his Ultimate Reloader website. Gavin says this lube mix is a good complement to the Hornady One-Shot (pistol) and Dillon DCL (rifle) lubes he has used for pistol and rifle reloading sessions. CLICK HERE to read more.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Reloading 4 Comments »
June 8th, 2017

Advanced Reloading: Sorting Brass by Neck-Wall Thickness

neck sorting tool case-neck Sinclair caliber neck tension

He who dies with the most toys wins — right? Well Sinclair has another interesting gadget you can add to your reloading bench. The Sinclair Case Neck Sorting Tool lets you quickly sort brass by neck-wall thickness. For those who shoot “no-turn” brass, sorting your cases helps achieve more uniform neck tension and, thereby, more consistent bullet seating. Large variances in neck-wall thickness can cause inconsistent neck “grip” on the bullet. Generally, we’ve found that more consistent neck tension will lower ES and (usually) improve accuracy.

Get Better Results with No-Turn Brass
We know some guys who shoot no-turn 6mmBR brass in competition with considerable success — but their secret is pre-sorting their brass by neck-wall thickness. Cases that are out-of-spec are set aside for sighters (or are later skim-turned).

Watch Case Neck Sorting Tool Operation in Video (May not load on mobile devices)

Case Neck thickness sorting gauge Sinclair accurateshooter.comHow the Case Neck Sorting Tool Works
Here’s how the Sinclair tool works. Cases are rotated under an indicator tip while they are supported on a case-neck pilot and a support pin through the flash hole. The unit has a nice, wide base and low profile so it is stable in use. The tool works for .22 through .45 caliber cases and can be used on .17- and .20-caliber cases with an optional carbide alignment rod. The MIC-4 pin fits both .060 (PPC size) and .080 (standard size) flash holes. Sinclair’s Case Neck Sorting Tool can be ordered with or without a dial indicator. The basic unit without indicator (item 749-006-612WB) costs $59.99. Complete with dial indicator (item 749-007-129WB), the tool costs $89.99. IMPORTANT: This tool requires caliber-specific Case Neck Pilots (sold separately).

Editor’s Comment: The purpose of this Sinclair tool is rapid, high-quantity sorting of cartridge brass to ascertain significant case-neck-wall thickness variations. Consider this a rapid culling/sorting tool. If you are turning your necks, you will still need a quality ball micrometer tool to measure neck-wall thickness (to .0005) before and after neck-turning operations.

Permalink Gear Review, Reloading 4 Comments »
June 7th, 2017

Five Red Dot Reflex Sights for Handguns

Vortex Sig Sauer Burris Bushnell Trijicon red dot reflex site heads up display Venom

Red Dot (aka “Reflex”) sights help pistol shooters hit their targets quickly. With these sights you simply place the dot on the target. Head alignment is not critical. These sights offer an open field of view, virtually no parallax, and eye relief is basically unlimited. You don’t have to worry about aligning front and rear sights — as long as you can see the red dot you’re good to go. The only real negative is that the red dot can be hard to see in very bright sunlight, and users with strong astigmatism may see a blurry or fuzzy image instead of a sharp dot.

As quoted in Outdoor Life, pistol champion Doug Koenig explains: “Red-dot sights are fast, superior in low light, and allow the shooter to simply focus on the target.” For those reasons competitive action pistol shooters can shoot faster with red dot sights. They definitely offer a “competitive advantage”, and that’s why iron sights guns run in a different class in most pistol matches.

The NRA Blog recently reviewed five (5) red dot sight systems for handguns. Red dots give let shooters focus on the target rather worry about sight alignment. In addition, red dots aid older shooters who often have trouble with close focusing. TIP: If you need reading glasses — a red dot can help.

READ FULL RED DOT Sight Review in NRABlog.com »

Sig Sauer Romeo 1 First Strike red dot reflex site heads up display Vortex Burris Fastfire III

SIG SAUER Romeo 1
SIG SAUER’s Romeo 1 open reflex sight is built with SIG’s twin adjustment springs that provide a “lock-less” zeroing system while maintaining zero. The sight body is CNC-machined from solid billet magnesium to be lightweight and strong, and its molded aspherical lens is bright and distortion-free. The Motion Activated Illumination (MOTAC) system recalls the last brightness setting used, so you don’t have to remember those adjustments on your own.

Vortex red dot reflex site heads up display Venom

Vortex Venom
Vortex’s Venom reflex sight can be mounted on pistols with Picatinny rails, as well as tactical rifles and shotguns. The 3 MOA dot is easy to see in nearly any lighting conditions and allows users to shooting accurately at long ranges. Ultra-clear multi-coated lenses provide a wide field of view with sharp image quality, and brightness controls are easy to find and use, located on the left side of the unit. The Venom features 14-hour auto-shutdown to extend battery life, and the unit is built shockproof and waterproof to withstand harsh operational demands.

Vortex red dot reflex site heads up display Burris Fastfire III

Burris Fastfire III
Burris’ Fastfire III is one of the most versatile red dots on the market. In addition to the unlimited eye relief awarded by red dots, the Fastfire III features windage and elevation adjustments that don’t require the use of a proprietary or special tool – just a small flathead screwdriver is needed to make adjustments, and comes bundled. Battery access on the top of the sight makes it easier to change batteries, and the Fastfire III includes a battery warning indicator and eight-hour auto-shutoff to prolong battery service life.

Bushnell First Strike red dot reflex site heads up display Vortex Burris Fastfire III

Bushnell First Strike
Known for quality sights at great prices, Bushnell delivers again with the First Strike, one of the most affordable red dot sights available. Despite its affordability, the First Strike is well made, and an ideal candidate for use with smaller-caliber firearms, such as rimfire pistols. Like many other reflex sights, the First Strike mounts using the Picatinny rail system, so you’ll need to ensure your pistol either has a rail included or can facilitate a small mounting rail section. The First Strike is waterproof, shock-proof and fog-proof, and coated lenses ensure excellent light transmission, allowing easy target acquisition up to 100 yards — well beyond normal pistol range.

Trijicon First Strike red dot reflex site heads up display Vortex Burris Fastfire III

Trijicon RMR
Trijicon’s RMR (Ruggedized Miniature Reflex) sight is one of the most durable mini red dots available today. Produced from 7075-T6 aluminum to military specifications, the RMR is lightweight but strong, using a patented shape that absorbs impact and diverts stress away from the lens. The RMR is available in dual-illuminated, LED, and adjustable LED models with dot sizes from 1 to 13 MOA. The RMR is waterproof to 20 meters (66 feet), and boasts easy adjustment for windage and elevation.

Permalink Gear Review, Handguns, Optics 1 Comment »
June 7th, 2017

Smart Choice: CZ 455 for Rimfire Cross-Training

CZ-455 Tacticool Varmint rifle .22LR

Are you looking for a .22 LR Rimfire rifle that has the look and feel of a centerfire rig? Then check out the CZ 455 rimfire rifle featuring a black-finished, laminated wood stock. This gun, dubbed the “Varmint Tacticool” by CZ-USA, features a 5-round detachable magazine and adjustable trigger. And recently CZ added a Suppressor-Ready version fitted with a 16.5″ barrel and threaded muzzle.

CZ-455 Tacticool Varmint rifle .22LR

The original CZ-455 Varmint Tacticool was built as an affordable tactical trainer with the ergonomics and stock profile of a full-size centerfire tactical rig. The Tacticool’s stock looks similar to the Manners Composites stock on CZ’s 455 Varmint Precision Trainer, but the wood-stocked ‘Tacticool’ version is much less expensive. The CZ 455 with Manners stock retails at $940.00 MSRP while the latest suppressor-ready Tacticool model lists for $549.00 MSRP. The $391.00 you save will buy a LOT of ammo (or a scope).

Tacticool Accuracy Demo — Nailing Match-Sticks at 30 Yards — Five for Five

We like the looks of the CZ-455 ‘Tacticool’, and the stock has some nice features. The butt-hook stock has ambidextrous palm swells on the grip and a raised comb to provide a comfortable cheek weld for shooting with a scope. The fore-end features a wide, beavertail swell for greater stability on a front sandbag. There are two (2) sling swivel studs so you can attach both a sling and a bipod.

At $940 MSRP, the CZ 455 Precision Trainer in Manners Stock is much more expensive.

CZ-455 Tacticool Varmint rifle .22LR

Permalink Gear Review, Tactical No Comments »
May 30th, 2017

Varminter.com Field Tests New Lead Free 17 WSM Ammo

Varminter.com winchester 17 WSM lead free no lead rifle test
Photo Courtesy Varminter.com.

The team at Varminter.com just completed an extensive test of Winchester’s new LEAD FREE 17 WSM ammunition. During multiple sessions, Varminter.com shot the ammo using no less than nine different rifles. Four, 5-shot groups were shot with each rifle from the bench at 100 yards. Results were impressive. Average group size for a 1:9″-twist heavy barrel Savage B-Mag was a remarkable 0.5005 inches. Group size averages for seven of the eight other 17-cal rifles* ranged from 0.755 to 1.03 inches at 100 yards — pretty impressive for factory rimfire rigs. A LOT of time was invested in this test, and we recommend you read the full report on Varminter.com.

» READ FULL 17 WSM Lead-Free AMMO Review on Varminter.com

Fastest Rimfire Cartridge Ever
If you’re not familiar with this cartridge, the 17 WSM is the fastest, flattest-shooting rimfire round you can buy. It stomps the .22 LR, and even offers significantly better ballistics than the popular 17 HMR. This lead- free version is impressively flat-shooting. With a 100-yard zero, it drops only 4.3 inches at 200 yards. Compare that with a .22 LR which can drop 18 inches or more from 100 to 200 yards (based on 1150 fps MV).

Varminter.com winchester 17 WSM lead free no lead rifle test

Zinc Replaces Lead in Winchester’s Eco-Friendly 17 WSM
For folks who live in areas where lead ammo is restricted, such as California, the arrival of this Lead Free 17 WSM is good news. Winchester’s new 17 WSM ammunition features a Zinc-cored, polymer-tipped 15-grain bullet with 0.118 G1 BC. The ammo is rated at a speedy 3300 FPS velocity. Winchester says that the zinc core and “thin alloy jacket with engineered sidewall profile” deliver “explosive fragmentation.”

Varminter.com winchester 17 WSM lead free no lead rifle test

*The ninth rifle, a Savage BMAG with original thin-contour barrel, was the “odd man out”. Accuracy was mediocre, averaging 1.763 inches.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting No Comments »
May 29th, 2017

CMP Custom Shop Repairs and Upgrades Vintage Rifles

cmp custom shop USGI rifle repairs

CMP Custom Shop Civilian Marksmanship ProgramThe Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) does more than run matches and sell surplus firearms. The CMP also operates a full-service Custom Shop in Anniston, Alabama that does maintenance, repair, and upgrading of USGI-issue rifles at a reasonable cost.

Since the fall of 2013, the CMP Custom Shop has offered repair, upgrade, gunsmithing and custom services for a wide range of U.S. Military rifles, specifically those issued in early eras. As well as regular repairs and troubleshooting, the CMP Custom Shop can upgrade, accurize, and refinish virtually all the rifle types sold by the CMP.

What Rifles Can the CMP Custom Shop Service?
The CMP Custom Shop will work on the M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, 1903/1903A3 Springfield, 1917 Enfield, and the Krag. The Custom Shop will also service Remington 40X, Mossberg 44, and H&R Model 12 rifles. CMP will NOT work on shotguns, pistols, revolvers, M14/M1A, AR15-style rifles or other commercially-produced modern rifles. For a list of services (with prices) visit the CMP Custom Shop webpage.

cmp custom shop USGI rifle repairs

NOTE: Before you can send a rifle to the CMP Custom Shop you must be a customer on file in the CMP system. Customers must meet the same eligibility requirements as for CMP rifle purchases. Once qualified, you can purchase a rifle from the CMP and have the CMP Custom Shop make modifications to it prior to shipping.

CMP Custom Shop Can Work on USGI Rifles Purchased from Other Sources
The CMP Custom Shop can work on rifles that may have been purchased elsewhere as long as they were made by a USGI contractor. Some examples include: Springfield Armory (not Springfield Inc.), Harrington & Richardson, Winchester, International Harvester, Remington, Rock Island, Eddystone, Inland, Underwood, Rock-Ola, Quality Hardware, National Postal meter, Standard Products, IBM, Irwin-Pederson and Saginaw. NOTE: There are many NON-USGI copies of the M1 Garand, 1903 Springfield and especially the M1 Carbine that CMP will be unable to work on.

CMP Custom Shop Garand 1903 repair

CMP Custom Shop Garand 1903 repairFor more information, call (256) 835-8455, x1113, or send email to customshop [at] thecmp.org. Shipping and Correspondence address for the CMP Custom Shop is:

CMP Custom Shop
1803 Coleman Rd
Anniston, AL 36207

Permalink Gear Review, Gunsmithing 1 Comment »
May 28th, 2017

The Fixed Power Option — Save Thousands on a Comp Scope

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallax
The 46x48mm side-parallax Weaver XR (matte black) costs less than $900.00 on Amazon.

With the cost of some high-end, high-magnification zoom scopes climbing well past the $3000-dollar mark, some shooters are considering a return to fixed-power optics. These are still quite popular in the short-range Benchrest game where weight is “mission critical” and the need to view mirage at lower power is not so critical. But now we are seeing some F-Class competitors considering fixed-power scopes — primarily for the increased reliability and huge cost savings. The $2000+ you can save (compared to a $3000+ Zoom) could buy a custom action, trigger, and premium barrel!

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallax

One scope to consider is Weaver’s latest T-Series 46X target scope with side-focus parallax control. With a street price around $900.00, the new Weaver T-Series XR 46x48mm scope offers a lot of bang for the buck compared to the pricey zoom scopes. Compared to the older T-36, this new 46-power XR scope offers more magnification, more elevation, a larger front objective (48mm vs. 40mm), and a larger 30mm main tube (compared to 1″ for the old T-36). The new XR 46X Weaver also features side-focus parallax control. That’s a big change. You could instantly spot a classic Weaver T-36 by the adjustable front objective with its knurled ring and yardage markings. The T-Series XR 46X (as well as the new XR 24X and XR 36X) have the parallax control on the left side of the main tube (photo below).

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallaxWe have looked through the new Weaver 46X scope and it is very sharp. Brightness is good — it seems comparable with a Leupold 45x45mm Competition (but that was on a bright, sunny day). Initial tests show the clicks to be tactile and positive, but we haven’t had a chance to do a full “box test” to confirm tracking. Weaver claims the new XR series scopes will focus down to 50 feet, but with the 46X we had some questions about its extreme close-focus capability. If you’re shooting beyond 50 yards, the focus should be fine.

The new T-Series 46X XR is offered with two reticle choices, a fine cross-hair (FCH), or FCH with 1/16th MOA dot. Both reticles are well-suited for benchrest work. You can find the new 46X Weaver for under $900.00. That’s way more than the old T-36, but it undercuts Leupold fixed-power competition scopes by hundreds of dollars.

Weaver XR series target scope side focus parallaxOther Side-Focuc 36X T-Series XR Scopes with Side-Focus and 1″ Tubes
The new 46-power XR scope is the star of the XR line-up. Designed to go head-to-head with Leupold’s 45X Competition scope, the 46X Weaver XR offers a modern 30mm main-tube and large (48mm) front objective. If you don’t need the bigger tube and larger objective, but still want side-focus parallax control, Weaver offers two other new XR scopes — a 36x40mm and a 24x40mm. These both retail for under $630.00.

Older T-Series Weavers for Under $450.00
If you’re on a tight budget and don’t need 46-power magnification and side parallax control, you may want to consider the older 36-power T-series Weavers. These adjustable front-objective Weaver “Tees” enjoy a good reputation for reliability. They’re not a bright as the XR models, but you can now purchase the older T-series scopes with adjustable front objectives for well under $450.00 in both black finish and silver finish. For benchrest shooting at a fixed distance, side-focus is not necessary; adjustable front objectives work just fine. Just set and forget.

Permalink Gear Review, Optics 1 Comment »
May 25th, 2017

Rust Blocker Comparison Test — Video Reveals the Ugly Truth

See Results of Anti-Corrosion Product Test in Video

YouTube Link: http://youtu.be/uOB5eCReAQY

What anti-corrosion products really fight rust effectively? You’ll hear many opinions, but what do actual field tests reveal? One rifle shooter, who posts on YouTube as BlueonGoldZ, wanted to separate myth (and marketing claims) from reality, so he completed his own long-term rust test using metal samples. First he used ordinary tap water spray, and then he did a second, longer-duration test with a salt-spray solution. Nine different products were tested: Break Free CLP, Corrosion-X, Frog Lube, M-Pro 7, Outers, Pro-Shot Zero Friction, Rem Oil, Slip 2000, and Tetra Gun Triple Action CLP.

Rust Corrosion test video

BlueonGoldZ initially examined each product for its “beading” properties with a normal tap water spray. But the main test involved many multiple weeks of exposure after a “dense” salt-water spray. (No rust formed after two weeks tap water exposure, so the test was accelerated with salt-water exposure).

Rust Corrosion test video

The clear winners in the test, as shown by the screen shot above, were Corrosion-X (Best), and Frog-Lube (Second Best). The photo shows the test samples two weeks after being sprayed with salt water. The results are pretty dramatic — you can see with your own eyes what happened. We think this is a very useful bit of real-world research.

Results from Similar Long-Term Salt Exposure Test
Unfortunately, BlueonGoldZ’s test did NOT include Eezox, which we have found to be extremely effective (on a par with Corrosion-X). In another long-term test of corrosion preventatives, the two best rust fighters were Eezox and Corrosion-X in that order. Since that test was completed, Corrosion-X, already an excellent product, has been enhanced. CLICK HERE for Long-Term Salt Exposure Test Report.

Permalink - Videos, Gear Review 6 Comments »
May 24th, 2017

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56 PM II 2FP Scope Review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt & Bender 5-25×56mm PM II SFP Review
Test conducted by RifleShooter.com
For police and military use, the Schmidt & Bender PM II (Police Marksman) is the gold standard of extreme use rifle optics. Other high end scopes aspire to the PM II’s level of durability, optical clarity, repeatability, and performance. With our assistance, RifleShooter.com recently conducted an in-depth test of Schmidt & Bender’s 5-25×56 PM II, Second Focal Plane (SFP) version. Here are the results…

» READ FULL 5-25x56mm PM II Scope Review (LONGER VERSION)

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The test scope is a 5-25×56 PM II (SKU: 677-911-995-A8-A2) with a Second Focal Plane (SFP) P4FL2-MOA reticle; double-turn elevation with rotation indicator; single turn windage; 1/4-MOA click values; illuminated reticle; and side adjustable parallax from 10 meters to infinity. This is an impressive beast — a big, sturdy, well-made optic.

Schmidt & Bender scopes have sophisticated features and a wide array of available options. The many options and features of the 5-26x56mm PM II are explained in this Schmidt & Bender video:

Second Focal Plane (SFP) Reticles
The Second Focal Plane (SFP) reticle design works well for long-range target shooters, benchrest shooters, hunters, and law enforcement. Often, SFP reticles are associated with Minute of Angle/MOA-based reticles. For target shooters who like to dial-in the elevation corrections, frequently SFP is the preferred reticle type. Also, these reticles are offered with thinner lines and markings to aid in target shooting, by not covering up as much of the target area, which is absolutely necessary in such cases as F-Class and Benchrest shooting. With a SFP reticle the size/width of the reticle lines stay constant at all magnifications.

Tall Target and Box Tests

Commentary by Rifleshooter.com Editor
To get an idea of how the PM II tracked I wanted to conduct a tall target and box test. I set up a couple of ISPC targets at 100 yards (below).

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

The target on the left is for the tall ladder test, the target at the right is for the box test.

With the scope zeroed* I set up a tall target test at 100 yards. I placed a 1″ orange dot on a pair of targets (above, left). We then used a four foot level to draw a plum line moving up from the dot and fired the three shot group below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

I dialed 30 MOA of elevation on the scope and fired another group. Measuring the distance between the two groups, would indicate how well the scope is tracking.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Since 1 MOA is 1.047″ at 100 yards, 30 MOA would be 31.41″ (30 x 1.047″ = 31.41″), looking at my tape measure, everything checked out (above).

Next I conducted a quick box test and set up an IPSC target with a orange paster at 100 yards. To do this I first Fired one round with the scope zeroed, then…

Dialed 6 MOA left, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA up, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA right, fired one round
Dialed 15 MOA down, fired one round
Dialed 6 MOA left and fired one round

After this, you want to see two holes close to each other on the first target, as well as the correct spacing dialed in between each hole, so how did the PM II do?

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Well, it worked like a champ! The rest of my time with the PM II has been equally impressive.

SUMMARY — Our Assessment of the 5-25×56 PM II

Here are our key conclusions from testing the Schmidt & Bender PM II 5-25×56 SFP:

— It’s a lot of scope. The PM II is pretty much the best scope you’ll be able to buy anywhere in the world. There is a reason they are in such widespread Military and Law Enforcement use, it has earned its reputation.

— Great zero stop. The PM II has the easiest-to-adjust turret and zero stop system I have ever used. On the PM II, Schmidt & Bender’s exclusive “Sub Zero Stop” system allows movement below zero. On the test scope it was 1.75 MOA. This is a great feature if you switch ammunition or elevation and need to bump your zero down.

— Tracks well. This was to be expected with its widespread use by military units throughout the world.

— Crisp, precise adjustments. The tactile feel of the knobs is exceptional.

— Crystal clear glass. Great light transmission and reticle.

This Schmidt & Bender catalog page shows reticle options for the 5-25×56 PM II:

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review
Click image to zoom

Turrets and Controls — How They Work

On the right side of the optic, you’ll notice a .250 MOA single-turn windage adjustment knob. On the top you’ll note the .250 MOA elevation adjustments. The tactile feel of each “click” is impressive — crisp and precise. A large parallax knob is located on the left side of the turret. The smaller knob located closer to the eyepiece is the adjustment knob for the illuminated reticle.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Here the view from behind the scope. Note the DT (double turn) elevation turret. At its current setting in the photo above, it is still on the first revolution (.250 MOA below 0) and as adjustments within the first revolution are made, you’d read the white numbers. During the second revolution, the windows in the top of the turret turn yellow, as shown below.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

Test Rifle — .300 Win Mag in Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
For testing and evaluation purposes I mounted the PM II in Spuhr ISMS mount on a custom made .300 Winchester Magnum rifle. Testing was done with handloaded ammo: Sierra’s 195-grain Tipped MatchKings over Norma brass and Hodgdon H4831SC powder.

This is the test rifle I used. It was built primarily with parts from Brownells.

Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

  • Stiller action
  • Accuracy International AICS AX Chassis
  • Shilen Select Match barrel, #7 1:10″ twist
  • Badger Ordnance FTE brake
  • Spuhr ISMS mount
  • Jewel HVR trigger
  • Aimpoint T1 micro sight
  • Sierra 7 bipod
  • Here is the Schmidt & Bender 5-25x56mm PM II SFP (foreground) alongside three other S&B products:
    5-25×56 PM II FFP (Desert Tan), 12-50×56 PM II, 3-20×50 PM II

    Schmidt Bender 5-25x56mm Second Focal Plane MOA riflescope scope Rifleshooter field text box gear review

    Better Pricing, Better Warranty, Better Availabilty
    In addition to increased production and availability, Schmidt and Bender has reduced retail pricing on PMII models 14-19% depending on the model. S&B Marketing Director Kyle Brown commented, “S&B improved its warranty in the USA for 2017, and now offers a USA 20-Year Transferable Limited Warranty. We have reduced our pricing to be competitive; and have greatly increased our on-hand inventory levels to supply our customers with complete and on-time deliveries.”

    Schmidt & Bender has made an effort to support the Precision Rifle Series (PRS). Brown said “for 2017 we have made a very hard push to become more active in PRS with our brand and with our products.”.

    To learn more about Schmidt & Bender optics, CLICK HERE.


    * Zeroing Process for PM II: The zero stop and turret settings are controlled by set screws. Zeroing is a breeze. You don’t have to move caps, insert shims, move clutch mechanisms, and so on. Simply loosen the screws, swing the turret back to “0” and you are all set. To establish a 100-yard zero, I hung a target at 50 yards, fired one round, dialed a correction, fired a confirmation shot and moved back to 100 yards. I fired one round at 100, made a correction and was zeroed. That’s it, three rounds, done.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Optics 8 Comments »
    May 23rd, 2017

    Precision Acrylic Loading Blocks from Bullets.com

    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    High-quality loading blocks precisely sized for your cartridge types make the reloading process easier. Bullets.com now offers acrylic loading blocks that set new standards for this kind of product. Precision CNC-machined from solid acrylic, these beautiful loading blocks were designed by a member of the U.S. Shooting Team. Dimensions are ultra-precise and these blocks even have a primer recess in each hole so the cases sit perfectly. You can order blocks for a variety of rifle cartridge types: .223 Rem Family, .308 Win Family, .308 Tall (.30-06), RSAUM and WSM Magnum, Magnum Tall, .338 LM Family, .50 BMG. In addition, there are blocks for most popular pistol cartridges: .380/9mm, .38 SPL, .38 Super, .40 SW, .44 Magnum, .45 ACP. These blocks are affordable, starting at just $10.95. The popular .308 Win Family blocks are $11.95.

    Click photo to view full-screen image:
    Bullets.com Acrylic Loading Blocks Pistol Rifle

    Tech Insight — Acrylic Machining Process
    The folks at Bullets.com tell us that machining acrylic is not as easy as it seems. Making precision blocks is a multi-stage process involving special equipment. Solid slabs are first machined flat so they are parallel. Then several custom cutters are used to craft precisely-arranged holes with nice chamfers on each hole as well as the outside edge. Every hole bottom has a milled, secondary primer pocket so the primers don’t contact the bottoms. The see-through blocks are finished to a nice sheen.

    Permalink Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
    May 17th, 2017

    Budget Co-Axial Rest — The $200 Caldwell (Plus Upgrade)

    fire control rest conversion

    Available for under $200.00 including front bag, the Caldwell Fire Control front rest is a remarkable value. It makes the co-axial, joystick design more affordable than ever. We used the Fire Control front rest when testing our Ultimate Varminter 20 Practical AR. Once we removed some sand from the tri-lobe front bag, the rest worked quite well.

    Get a Fire Control Rest for $197.99
    Precision Reloading is running a sale this week on Caldwell products. Now through May 23rd you can get the Caldwell Fire Control Front Rest for just $197.99. That’s a great deal for guys on a tight budget who want a modern joystick-style front rest. With the conversion described in this article, you can put together a system that works pretty darn well, and is more than adequate for many applications, including prairie-dog hunting (from a bench).

    fire control rest conversion

    Upgrading Fire Control Front Rest with Sinclair Top

    While most Fire Control owners are happy with the product, many have wanted to replace the tri-lobe front bag with a more conventional front bag from Protektor or Edgewood. This isn’t as easy as it looks because the width of the Fire Control top is too narrow for most standard 3″-wide front bags. On a “special order” basis, Protektor has crafted some narrower leather front bags that fit pretty well, but some shooters have decided to “upgrade” the entire front assembly.

    Forum member Doug M. (aka DrJeckyl), has come up with an elegant solution that allows a Sinclair Int’l Benchrest Rest Top to be fitted to the Fire Control Rest. Doug notes: “The Caldwell Fire Control is a nice rest for the money, but it comes up short in the rest top department. The Sinclair RT-3 [or its replacement, the Gen II B/R top] fits perfect with minor modifications.” Shown below are the main components:

    fire control rest conversion

    To adapt the Sinclair RT-3 or Gen II B/R top, Doug merely had to drill a couple holes in the RT-3 baseplate, and adapt a spacer to get the height correct: “The Caldwell factory top has a raised mounting portion so a 1/8″ piece of stock will be needed as a spacer to the flat-bottom RT-3. The spacer needs to be cut to the same length as the movable portion on the rest. And you should plan the mounting accordingly so the left thumbscrew clears the vertical height column at full left position (there is a cutaway in the rest under the thumbscrew that allows for easy access to the screw).” We have labeled the photo with dimensions, but Doug cautions you should measure your own original plate to insure the drill locations are correct for your unit.

    fire control rest conversion

    The completed installation, with the RT-3 installed on the Fire Control rest is shown at the top of this article. Doug says it works very well. To learn more about this conversion, with Doug’s measurments for the hole-spacing and his specs on the fasteners, go to the original thread in our Shooter’s Forum. NOTE: Sinclair no longer sells the RT-3 top, but Sinclair’s $75.99 Gen II B/R top can be converted just as easily. LINK to Fire Control Rest Top Conversion Forum Thread.

    fire control rest conversion

    Permalink Gear Review, Hot Deals 1 Comment »
    May 16th, 2017

    GEAR News: CMP Announcement RE Shooting Jacket Rules

    CMP Civilian Marksmanship Shooting coat jacket monard rules

    The great shooting coat controversy has been quelled — at least for the next few months. The CMP will not be banning any brands of commonly-used jackets for now. On Monday, May 15th, the CMP announced that it would halt “strict enforcement” of shooting jacket rules for the remainder of 2017, until new, clear standards can be adopted. Here is the CMP’s statement:

    Moratorium on Strict Enforcement of Shooting Jacket Rules
    The Civilian Marksmanship Program has declared a moratorium on strict enforcement of rules on design and construction of shooting jackets for 2017 until specific procedures and measurement tools are developed to determine the maximum amount of support coats may provide to competitors.

    “The CMP 2018 Rules will contain further clarifications concerning jacket design and construction specifics going forward,” said Mark Johnson, CMP’s Chief Operating Officer. “The CMP strives to institute rules that promote true marksmanship skill and those that resist the equipment race (gamesmanship) facets of our sport.”

    “The CMP’s matches are being developed to enhance competitor learning and increasing their own personal marksmanship skill set, not who can buy the best gadget for means of additional support or easier access to higher point totals,” Johnson said.

    In 2017, the primary emphasis of the shooting jacket rule, 6.6.1 in the CMP Highpower Rifle and Pistol Competition Rules, 21st Edition – 2017, still applies. The rule states, in part, “Shooting jackets made of flexible material may be worn in CMP Rifle events. Shooting jackets may have shoulder, sling and elbow pads providing those pads are not constructed so as to provide rigid artificial support. Jacket constructions that use back braces (…) or other non-flexible materials are prohibited.”

    For 2018, it is the CMP’s intent to provide a clear and concise definition of “flexibility” as it relates to support materials used in shooting jackets and a simple measurement process capable of passing or failing jackets across the entire spectrum of highpower rifle jackets in the marketplace.”

    Jacket Rules Not Abandoned Completely
    We commend readers to look at the second-to-last paragraph in the CMP statement above. The CMP says Rule 6.6.1 still applies, requiring shooting jackets to be made of “flexible materials” without “rigid, artificial support”. Keep that in mind. While the CMP is halting “strict enforcement” of jacket rules, you still can’t show up with a bionic exo-skeleton.

    Permalink Competition, Gear Review, News No Comments »
    May 15th, 2017

    New Otis Smart Chemicals — Cleaners, Lubricants, Protectants

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Otis has released a new line of advanced, American-made chemicals designed to bring next-generation protection to any kind of firearm. Featuring a broad variety of cleaners, lubricants, protectants and CLPs, the Otis Smart Chemical product line offers formulas for any kind of shooter — from 3-Gun competitors to hunters and tactical professionals to gun collectors.

    Video Covers All Otis Smart Chemicals — Cleaners, Lubricants, Protectants:

    Formulated to the exact specification of Otis engineers and designed with intelligent application in mind, most Otis Smart Chemicals are biodegradable and available in liquid or aerosol form (as well as in grease and CLP wipes). A precision applicator pack is compatible with all liquid formulas to deliver a greater level of precision during the application process. Visit www.otistec.com/cleansmart to explore the full line or buy your Otis Smart Chemicals online.

    For cleaning tasks, Otis offers a specific series of dedicated cleaning products. These combine excellent cleaning capabilities with biodegradable chemistry.

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Otis Smart Chemicals gun cleaner lubricant review CLP protectant

    Permalink Gear Review, New Product No Comments »
    May 14th, 2017

    Build Your Own Shooting Bench Using FREE Plans

    Free shooting bench plansFREE shooting Bench Plans

    Building your own portable shooting bench is a great do-it-yourself project. You can build a sturdy bench for well under $100 in materials. Compare that to some deluxe factory-built benches which may cost $600.00 or more.

    FREE Bench Plans on the Web
    You’ll find a wide assortment of home-built shooting bench designs (both portable and fixed) on the internet. Renovation Headquarters has links to FREE Plans and building instructions for fourteen (14) different shooting benches. There are all-wood shooting bench designs as well as benches that combine a wood top with a metal sub-frame or legs.

    CLICK HERE for Shooting Bench FREE Plans Webpage

    Among Renovation HQ’s fourteen featured shooting benches, here are five designs we liked:

    Larry Willis Shooting Bench

    Sandwiched Plywood top, 1.5″ Galvanized Pipe Legs

    Manuel Ferran’s
    Steel Shooting Bench

    Steel (welded) legs and frame, painted plywood top. Folds flat.

    eHow Permanent All-Wood
    Shooting Bench

    Heavy-duty, very solid and sturdy, but easy to build. Good for right- or left-handed shooters.

    Bill Clarke’s
    Basic Shooting Bench

    Restaurant table Cast Metal Pedestal Base, plywood top.

    Missouri Hillbilly’s
    All-Wood Bench

    3/4″ ACX Plywood with 4×6 Beams and Legs

    Heavy Wood Bench That Converts to Three Sections for Transport
    In addition to the fourteen benches mentioned above, here is an interesting break-down bench design. Call it a “semi-portable” bench. The legs and frame are made from stout 4×4 post segments so the bench is fairly heavy. However, this bench can break down into three (3) sections for easier transport to and from the range. Dado-cut channels assure proper top alignment. This might be a good choice if you plan a multi-day excursion to a location without fixed benches. This three-leg bench design can be made from easy-to-locate materials. Note: The dimensions of this bench are are larger than typical fixed benches to accommodate 50 BMGs and other big rifles. CLICK HERE for more details.

    FREE shooting Bench Plans

    (more…)

    Permalink Gear Review, Tech Tip No Comments »
    May 13th, 2017

    Forster Co-Ax Press — Unique Operation Showcased in Video

    Forster Co-Ax Coax Reloading Press Grafs Grafs.com Sale Co-Axial rockchucker

    In recent years, Forster Co-Ax® presses have been somewhat hard to find, as demand has out-stripped supply. However, right now Grafs.com has Co-Ax presses in stock, at just $299.99 — that’s six percent off the regular price. This sale price includes a set of jaws, and includes ground shipping (in the lower 48), after a single $7.95 (per order) handling fee. If you’ve been hankering for a Co-Ax press, now is definitely a good time to buy.

    If you are not yet familiar with the many unique features of the Forster Co-Ax, we recommend you watch the video embedded below. This shows how the press operates and highlights the design elements which set the Co-Ax apart from every other reloading press on the market.

    Video Shows Special Features of Forster Co-Ax Reloading Press

    Forster Co-Ax Press Video Review
    This is a very thorough review of the Forster Co-Ax done by Rex Roach. This 14-minute video shows the key Co-Ax features, explaining how the floating case-holder jaws work (3:30 time-mark), how the dies are held in place (4:40 time-mark), how spent primers are captured (6:10 time-mark), and how to set the primer seating depth (10:00 time-mark). We’ve used a Co-Ax for years and we still learned a few new things by watching this detailed video. If you are considering purchasing a Co-Ax, definitely watch this video start to finish.

    Forster Co-Ax Coax Reloading Press Grafs Grafs.com Sale Co-Axial rockchucker

    The Co-Ax case-holder features spring-loaded, floating jaws. These jaws have two sets of openings, small and large. This allows the system to adapt to various rim diameters. The jaw plates can simply be reversed to switch from small jaw to large jaw. In the photo above, the Co-Ax is configured with the large jaw openings in the center.

    Photos are screen shots from Forster Co-Ax Review by Rex Roach on YouTube.

    Permalink - Videos, Gear Review, Reloading No Comments »
    May 11th, 2017

    New $600 Competition Primer Seater from Primal Rights

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    Seating primers is kind of a “dark art”. Many top shooters prefer to seat “by feel” using a hand tool. Others prefer bench-mounted tools that offer higher work-flow rates — with a good bench tool you can prime more cases in a given amount of time, plus it’s easier on the hands.

    There have been many bench-mounted priming options — Forster has a tool, as does RCBS, and Lee. But there is a new player in the game — Primal Rights of South Dakota. And Primal Rights’ new Competition Primer Seater (CPS) may be the most precise bench priming tool yet offered to the public. It is certainly the most expensive. This patented tool costs $600.00! But the CPS delivers something special — superb, repeatable depth control, along with the ability to prime 1000 cases per hour. For some reloaders, that precision + productivity will justify the high price.

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    The Primal Rights CPS is built like a Swiss watch — the machining is beautiful. It also uses some unique internal engineering to achieve a superb “feel” when priming. Unlike some other tools, it is also very easy to adjust — simply turn a wheel to adjust seating depth. You can see this in the photos — the word “Deeper” with the directional arrow.

    Operation of Competition Primer System Shown in Video:

    Key Features of the Primal Rights CPS, as stated by the manufacturer:

    Speed with Precision: Some priming tools are very fast. Others are very precise. The CPS is the only priming tool to combine both features into a single unit. You can achieve seating depths accurate to within a thousandth of an inch, all while priming at a comfortable rate of over 20 cases per minute. At that pace you can easily prime over a thousand cases per hour.

    Precision Primer Seating Depth Control: The CPS has a revolutionary adjustable shell holder system which allows you to raise and lower your case in relation to the priming rod. You can seat the primer deeper or shallower in .001″ increments. The adjustment mechanism has tactile and audible clicks to ensure you stay on your desired seating depth. One click = One thousandth of an inch adjustment.

    Integrated Shuttle Feeding System: The CPS uses a manually-operated shuttle system to slide primers from the primer tube into position over the primer rod. This ensures that any jams or misaligned primers are easily and safely discovered by the operator.

    Check Out Competition Primer Seater Gear Review on Rifleshooter.com
    Our friend Bill at RifleShooter.com has just released a detailed review of Primal Rights’ bench-mounted priming tool. He was very impressed with the Primal Rights CPS, finding that it was fast to use yet very precise, with great feel: “The CPS uses a rotational drive system to seat primers. Unlike the lever systems you’ll normally encounter, this allows you better feel as the primer seats. The CPS is expensive. However, it is a solid tool. Amortize it over the time you’ll be reloading and it’ll be worth every cent. If you load a lot of precision ammunition and have the budget to support it, take a look at the CPS. I found it is a game changer. I wish I had one twenty years ago!” READ REVIEW.

    Primal Rights Competition Primer Seater System Rifleshooter.com gear review

    » Read Competition Primer Seater Review on Rifleshooter.com

    Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Gear Review, Reloading 18 Comments »