June 27th, 2015

Ring Reducers Adapt 30mm Rings to Fit 1″ Scope Tubes

Forum member Jacob spotted this simple, but effective set of scope ring inserts on the Brownells’ Website. With these inserts, you can use a scope with 1″-diameter body in 30mm rings. Non-marring, matte black Delrin sleeves surround the scope tube so it can fit larger-diameter rings. Each sleeve comes in two parts for easy installation around your scope tube. Ring Reducers are sold as front/rear kits. Cost is $14.99 for the 30mm to 1″ ring adapters, item 084-000-091.

Brownells Ring Reducers

Note: These Brownells units simply function as plastic bushings. Unlike Burris Signature Ring inserts, they do not allow you to “pre-load” windage or elevation. If your rings are misaligned, the Brownells Ring Reducers won’t correct that problem.

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May 22nd, 2014

Ring Inserts Adapt 1″-Diameter Scopes to Fit 30mm Rings

Brownells Ring ReducersForum member Jacob spotted this simple, but effective set of scope ring inserts on the Brownells Website. With these inserts, you can use a scope with 1″-diameter main tube in 30mm rings. Non-marring, matte black Delrin sleeves surround the scope tube so it can fit larger-diameter rings. Each sleeve comes in two parts for easy installation around your scope tube. This way you can use the same 30mm rings for all your scopes.

Ring Reducers are sold as front/rear kits. Cost is just $19.99 for the 1″ to 30mm converters, item 084-000-091. There are also sets that reduce 30mm rings to 25mm, and 1″ rings to 3/4″ or 7/8″.

Note: These Brownells units simply function as plastic bushings. Unlike Burris Signature Ring inserts, they do not allow you to “pre-load” windage or elevation. If your rings are misaligned, the Brownells Ring Reducers won’t correct that problem.

Permalink Gear Review, Optics 3 Comments »
January 24th, 2013

Kahles 10-50x56mm Scope with Centerline Parallax Control

Kahles K 1050 scope

At SHOT Show we got a “first look” at the new Kahles K-1050, a 10-50x56mm scope with unique, centerline parallax control. This is a very interesting new high-magnification competition scope. Kahles’s patented centerline parallax control allows the marksman to adjust windage, elevation, AND parallax all with ONE HAND. If you’re in prone position, for example, you simply reach forward with your right hand to dial windage, then slide your hand to the central turret to dial elevation and, finally, set the parallax by adjusting a separate concentric ring.

Watch Video to See Kahles K-1050 Features and Centerline Parallax Control

NOTE: The big-diameter metal ring is OPTIONAL. You can remove the big metal ring and still adjust parallax (from centerline) using a smaller, built-in control ring on the top turret.

Kahles K 1050 scope

Kahles K 1050 scopeDesigned for benchrest and field target use, this scope has a 30mm main tube, 55 MOA elevation, and 1/8-MOA clicks. There are three (3) total turret revolutions. The turret “Rev Count” is displayed with a clever red-and-white striped “barber pole” button in the center of the top turret. One red stripe indicates REV 1, red + white indicates REV 2, and red + white + red indicates REV 3. It’s simple, but it works.

The new K-1050 also features a nice European-style +/- diopter control on the eyepiece. If you have less that perfect vision, this allows you to get a sharp target image even without eyeglasses.

We liked the scope. The glass was bright and sharp, and the clicks were positive and precise. Competition shooters have shown great interest in the new K-1050, and Kahles plans to bring the new scope to the USA by mid-summer 2013. Price is expected to be around $2800.00 USD.

Kahles K 1050 scope

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January 11th, 2011

New Scope-Mounted Level and ADI Mount from Flatline Ops

Every serious shooter should have some kind of anti-cant device fitted to his or her rifle. When you tilt your rifle to one side or the other, even a little bit, this will alter your point of impact. Unless the direction and angle of tilt (or cant) is exactly the same for each shot, canting your rifle will open up your groups. READ MORE about rifle canting.

anti-cant Device Flatline Ops

New Anti-Cant System from Flatline Ops
Flatline Ops has developed a smart, scope-mounted leveling device with a fold-out bubble level. Flatline’s Accu/Level™, crafted from black-anodized 6061-T6 aluminum, clamps around the scope tube. Models are available for all common tube sizes: 1″, 30mm, and 34mm. There is also a Leupold MKIV version which clamps to the scope rail so it functions as a scope ring as well as a leveling device. All Accu/Level™ models can be fitted with an optional vertical Strong Arm™ accessory. The 6061-T6 aluminum Strong Arm has a dovetail for mounting an Angle-Degree-Indicator (ADI), which allows the shooter to make quick “true range” corrections for up-angle and down-angle shots. An Angle-Cosine-Indicator (ACI) also fits the dovetail.

YouTube Preview Image

As a combined unit, the Accu/Level™ (fitted with Strong Arm and ADI) is a great set-up for the tactical shooter or long-range hunter. The bubble level kicks out to the left for easy visibility (see Video above). The ADI is held in plain view on the left, under the bubble level. Of course the whole system can be reversed for left-handed shooters. On LongRangeHunting.com, Jim See explains how the Accu/Level works in the field and how he employed the ACI during a hunt. CLICK HERE for Accu/Level™ Field Test.

Good System — But Not Inexpensive
We like the combined Level + ADI system that Flatline Ops has developed. It is sturdy and well-designed. Our only concern is cost. The 30mm Accu/Level™ costs $139.99 and the Strong Arm (for ADI mounting) is $58.99. So you’ve got two hundred bucks invested before adding the $110.00 ADI. The whole set-up runs about $310.00. That’s a significant chunk of change that could be invested in your scope instead.

More Affordable Anti-Cant Alternatives
If you don’t need to make angled shots, you can get a simple rail-mounted B-Square bubble level from Brownell’s for $14.95. Mounting Solutions Plus offers a $29.95 tube-mounted anti-cant device with bubble level on top. If you prefer the bubble level on the side (for easier viewing) U.S. Optics makes a sturdy, rail-mount bubble level for $76.00. A hinged version, with inward-folding level, is $95.00.

anti-cant Device U.S. Optics

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January 4th, 2010

Sightron Releases Specs on 2010 Scope Models

Sightron has released photos and specifications of its entire 2010 scope line-up. This includes the new (and much awaited) 10-50x60mm SIII Long-range scope.

Sightron 10-50x60mm SIII scope

With a “street price” under $995.00, the Sightron 10-50 could become hugely popular in 600/1000-yard benchrest and F-Class shooting. The big new zoom features a jumbo 60mm objective, 30mm maintube, and 1/8 MOA clicks. Nearly 17″ long and weighing 28.9 ounces, make no mistake, this is a BIG piece of glass. If the new 10-50x60mm SIII Sightron is as good as the 8-32x50mm LR SIII we tested in 2009, this should be a fantastic scope for the money.

Sightron 10-50x60mm SIII scope

When will we have test results for the new 10-50? Very soon, hopefully. Sightron has promised to send the first available 10-50x60mm SIII production-model scope to AccurateShooter.com for testing and evaluation. We’ll share our findings as soon as we can put the new 10-50 through its paces in the field.

Consumer Survey on Reticle Choices
Currently the new 10-50x60mm scope is offered with two reticle options: a Fine Cross Hair (FCH) and a Fine Cross Hair with Target Dot (TD). The first shipment contains roughly an equal amount of each. However, Sightron’s product planners want to learn YOUR favored reticle choice. Consumer preference will influence the future production allocation between FCH and TD models. So, if the majority of you folks want a particular reticle, that’s what Sightron will try to provide in future shipments. Please respond to the POLL below with your reticle choice.

Permalink New Product, Optics 7 Comments »
May 4th, 2009

Weaver Introduces new "Super Slam" Scopes

Weaver OpticsWeaver is the latest company to introduce a new series of Japanese-made optics with a high (5:1) zoom ratio. The new Super Slam series includes 2-10×50, 3-15×50, and 5-20×50 riflescopes, all offered with 1″-diameter main tubes and four (4) reticle options: Dual-X (med. duplex), Fine Crosshair (with dot), Illuminated Duplex, and Weaver’s proprietary EBX™ ballistic reticle. According to Tom Knudtson, Weaver Product Line Manager. “This new EBX reticle allows for accurate bullet trajectory compensation for long-range shots and is a perfect compliment to our 3-point erector system with improved spring design.” Among the new 1″-tubed Super Slams, we think our readers will be most interested in the 6-20x50mm. This 27.5 oz. scope features side-focus parallax control, extra-hard lens coatings, and “pull-up” turrets (no caps to lose). The 6-20×50 has 1/8-MOA clicks and 3 finishes are offered: Matte Black, Gloss Black, and Silver.

Weaver Super Slam Tactical

Tactical Super Slams Have Front Focal Plane (FFP) Reticles
There are two new Japanese-made Super Slam Tactical Models, the 3-15×50 (#800362), and the 4-20×50 (#800360). Both scopes feature 30mm main tubes, large fixed turret knobs (no caps), and a mil-dot reticle. Notably, both Tactical models have the reticle in the front (first) focal plane. This means the size of the reticle (and the mildots) remain the same (relative to the object viewed) at all magnification levels. That is an important feature for shooters using the mil-dots for ranging. FFP design is logical for a true “tactical” scope, and Weaver was wise to incorporate FFP into the Super Slam Tactical scopes. Weaver claims these Tactical scopes are waterproof, fogproof, and shockproof.

Permalink New Product, Optics 2 Comments »
April 17th, 2009

Fit 1"-Diameter Scopes in 30mm Rings with Brownells Adapters

Forum member Jacob spotted this simple, but effective set of scope ring inserts on the Brownells’ Website. With these inserts, you can use a scope with 1″-diameter main tube in 30mm rings. Non-marring, matte black Delrin sleeves surround the scope tube so it can fit larger-diameter rings. Each sleeve comes in two parts for easy installation around your scope tube. This way you can use the same 30mm rings for all your scopes. Ring Reducers are sold as front/rear kits. Cost is just $19.99 for the 1″ to 30mm converters, item 084-000-091. There are also sets that reduce 30mm rings to 25mm, and 1″ rings to 3/4″ or 7/8″.

Brownells Ring Reducers

Note: These Brownells units simply function as plastic bushings. Unlike Burris Signature Ring inserts, they do not allow you to “pre-load” windage or elevation. If your rings are misaligned, the Brownells Ring Reducers won’t correct that problem.

Permalink Optics 1 Comment »
March 29th, 2009

Quick Review: Sightron SIII 6-24×50 LR Mildot

Review by LARRY BANEY

The Sightron 6-24×50mm Mildot is the latest in Sightron’s SIII line-up of side-focus, 30mm riflescopes. This follows the hot-selling 8-32×56mm SIII, which we reviewed last fall. While our 6-24x50mm test sample has a Mildot reticle, Sightron’s new 6-24x50mm scope is also offered with a fine cross-hair (FCH) with target dot reticle. Both Mildot and FCH versions are 14.96″ overall with a near-constant 3.6-3.8 inches of eye relief. Clicks are 1/4 MOA (15 MOA per revolution), and total elevation (and windage) adjustment is listed as 100 MOA (50 MOA on either side of center). That’s a class-leading amount of elevation, which should make the new 6-24×50mm popular with long-range shooters.

Sightron SIII Mildot

Shown above is the Sightron 6-24×50mm Mildot, flanked by a Leupold 8-25×50mm LRT and the Sightron 8-32×56mm. The controls on the 6-24 Sightron are identical to those of its big brother, but it is shorter, with a smaller objective. The shorter length and 50mm front objective allow a 2.8 ounce weight savings over the larger model (21.9 oz. vs. 24.7 oz.).

Sightron SIII Mildot

Sightron 6-24x50mm Quick Review
Assistant Editor Jason Baney has been evaluating the optical qualities of the new Sightron 6-24 Mildot scope. Jason also had a chance to test the scope’s real-world performance in a tactical match. Here is Jason’s report:

“When the new 6-24x50mm mil-dot Sightron SIII arrived, it looked like the little brother of the Sightron 8-32x56mm. Controls and “styling” are similar. This family relationship was made clear as my review of its performance progressed. It shared the same ergonomics, same superior glass, and same unbeatable tracking.

Sightron SIII MildotI had a Leupold 8.5-25x50mm LRT for comparison purposes. The Leupold, which is actually 24.3x at max power, is a popular scope with a good reputation for clarity and sharpness. However, the new 6-24x50mm Sightron seemed better in many respects than the Leupold LRT. The Sightron’s glass appeared superior, giving better color rendition, a brighter field of view, and better contrast.

Also, with the Sightron, there was no noticeable parallax lash in the side-focus system. There was no need to start the side-focus at a travel stop every time. You could simply dial the side parallax adjustment and get the observed target in sharp focus with minimal parallax. This has been a problem with some Leupolds (i.e. you can’t get minimal parallax and best focus at the same time.) While observing bullet holes in different colored targets at 300 yards, the Sightron also appeared to show slightly better resolution than the Leupold and therefore better ability to locate individual bullet holes in the paper.”

Field Testing at the Allegheny Sniper Challenge (ASC)
In any competition riflescope, precise, repeatable tracking is absolutely vital. When you crank-in elevation and/or windage you want the reticle to move the exact value you dialed. Then you want the scope to repeat exactly when you return to the original zero. To test the Sightron’s tracking, Jason did more than a simple range test. He tested the scope’s tracking in the “real world”, during a two-day tactical comp.

Jason reports: “The 6-24 was thrown into action right away at the Allegheny Sniper Challenge (ASC) in Seneca Rocks, WV in August 2008. This was a team match that I shot with my father. ASC entails interesting weather, and even more interesting shots. In a matter of two days, over 100 shots are expended and a scope’s adjustments are REALLY put to the test. Maintaining zero is very important, because there are no sighters to check your zero. Shots range from less than 100 yards to nearly 1200 yards, and in the end, everyone has clicked their scope up-and-down 40 times or more. This means 40+ up/down repetitions on the elevation knob. This is as tough a test of a scope’s tracking ability as you’ll find.”

Great Tracking Ability, Excellent Value
So how did the Sightron’s tracking rate? The new Sightron 6-24×50 returned from ASC with the EXACT same 100-yard zero as when it started. This scope maintained its zero as well or better than any other scope out there, including those costing $3000.00+. The scope’s great elevation range was also much appreciated. Jason reports: “With 100+ MOA of elevation available and a 20 MOA base on the rifle, I had enough ‘up’ to shoot all the way out to 1200 yards with no problem.”

Sightron SIII Mildot

In Jason’s opinion this scope will be very hard if not impossible to beat in its price range in many aspects. The new Sightron 6-24 certainly rivals the overall optical quality of the Sightron 8-32×56, and that’s saying a lot. But since it is a Mildot scope there is another level of scrutiny needed. This scope is not a purpose-built tactical scope, but it represents a good base on which to build if Sightron offers enhancements in the future. If a shooter wishes only to use the mil-dots for holdover, he will be well served, but a Front Focal Plane (FFP) reticle would be more useful for serious tactical work. An illuminated reticle would also be welcome, and Jason would like to see a different reticle design with half-mil markings.

Also, some tactical shooters would prefer to have mil-based click values, rather than 1/4 MOA clicks. In raising these points, we need to stress that the $800.00 Sightron 6-24x50mm Mildot is affordable and works well as a general-purpose scope with reticle marks that allow hold-overs. This scope was not designed to compete with a $2700.00 Schmidt & Bender PMII. Jason explains: “I just want the serious tactical guys to understand that the Sightron won’t give you all the features of a dedicated FFP mildot optic with mil-based clicks. However, at about $800.00 average retail, the Sightron 6-24x50mm costs less than a third of what you’ll pay for high-end tactical scopes from S&B or U.S. Optics.”

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