March 11th, 2017

Extreme Long Range — .338 Lapua Magnum at 2160 Yards

2160 yards 1.3 miles long range ELR .338 Lapua Magnum Ed Connors Speeded Gonzales
Ed Connors placed three consecutive shots all on target at 2160 yards for a sub-3/8 MOA group. Wow.

Amazing shooting — that’s how we’d describe what Ed Connors accomplished recently with his Speedy-built .338 Lapua Magnum LR rifle. Ed nailed a 3-shot group at 2160 yards that would be great at 1000 yards. Check out the target above. Now consider that the shooter was a full mile PLUS 400 yards away. That is truly remarkable accuracy.

At this distance, 2160 yards, one MOA is 22.61″. This three-consecutive-shot group, measuring about 8 inches, works out to less than 3/8 MOA. Think about that — most guys would be elated to shoot 3/8 MOA at two hundred yards. Ed did that at over two thousand yards!

That takes a great rifle, as well as great ammo. Ed says: “I believe in loading like a benchrest shooter to achieve these ultra long-range shots”.

Ed Connors 2160 yards steel shooting .338 Lapua Magnum

Rifle Specifications:
– .338 LM Rifle built by SG Rifles, LLC
– Surgeon Rifles Action (blueprinted by Speedy)
– Jewell Trigger (blueprinted by Speedy)
– McMillan Fiberglass Stock
– Nightforce 5-25x56mm ATACR Scope
– Bartlein 1:9″-twist 32″ Barrel, Speedy contour
– Amer. Prec. Arms “Fat Bastard” Muzzle Brake

Ammunition Specifications:
– Lapua .338 LM Brass turned with Nielsen “Pumpkin” turner.
– Hodgdon H1000 Powder, 90.8 Grains
– Remington 9 1/2 Magnum Primers
– Berger .338 Cal 300 grain Hybrid OTM Tactical Bullets seated .005″ off lands.
– Velocity: 2875 fps / SD 5.0

Ed Connors 2160 yards steel shooting .338 Lapua Magnum

Gunsmith Thomas “Speedy” Gonzalez writes: “Anytime you build a customer a rifle to work out beyond the 1000-yard mark you must work hand-in-hand with your customer and explain everything you are doing to ensure performance at distances most shooters never even contemplate (except in their dreams).

Ed was involved in all aspects of the projects from the reamer print to what we needed for both single-shot work and mag-fed function in timed competition. This was Ed’s very first work-out with his reborn Surgeon-actioned .338 Lapua Magnum. He did great to say the least!”

Pretty Darn Good at One Mile as Well…
While “tuning up” for his 2160-yard session. Ed also produced some very impressive results at one mile (1760 yards). Once he got “dialed in” he delivered three shots you can cover with the palm of your hand. That’s spectacular consistency at one mile.

2160 yards 1.3 miles long range ELR .338 Lapua Magnum Ed Connors Speeded Gonzales

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December 29th, 2013

Bryan Litz Talks — How to Get Best Results with Berger Hybrids

2013 SHOT Show Las VegasSHOT Show 2014 kicks off in two weeks in Las Vegas. While at SHOT Show next month, we plan to get the “inside scoop” on new bullet designs from Berger, Hornady, Lapua, Nosler and Sierra.

At SHOT Show 2012 we chatted with Berger Ballistician Bryan Litz about Berger’s popular line of Hybrid bullets. Berger now offers a wide range of Hybrids in multiple calibers and weights. In fact, for .30-Caliber shooters, Berger now offers seven different Hybrid match bullets, with weights from 155 grains up to 230 grains. Two .338-caliber OTM Tactical Hybrids were introduced in 2012 (a 250-grainer and a 300-grainer).

Bryan tells us: “The hybrid design is Berger’s solution to the age old problem of precision vs. ease of use. This design is making life easier for handloaders as well as providing opportunities for commercial ammo loaders who need to offer a high performance round that also shoots precisely in many rifles with various chamber/throat configurations.”

For those not familiar with Hybrid bullets, the Hybrid design blends two common bullet nose shapes on the front section of the bullet (from the tip to the start of the bearing surface). Most of the curved section of the bullet has a Secant (VLD-style) ogive for low drag. This then blends in a Tangent-style ogive curve further back, where the bullet first contacts the rifling. The Tangent section makes seating depth less critical to accuracy, so the Hybrid bullet can shoot well through a range of seating depths, even though it has a very high Ballistic Coefficient (BC).

In the video we asked Bryan for recommended seating depths for 7mm and .30-Caliber Hybrid bullets. Bryan advises that, as a starting point, Hybrid bullets be seated .015″ (fifteen thousandths) off the lands in most barrels. Watch the video for more tips how to optimize your loads with Hybrid bullets.

Berger Hybrid Bullet

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October 19th, 2012

Remington Recalls Rem-Brand .338 Lapua Magnum Ammunition

Remington .338 Recall

Remington has announced that it is recalling four (4) lots of Remington .338 Lapua Magnum ‘Express Rifle’ Ammunition. The recalled lots are: L13SA29L, L13SA29R, L13SB29L, and L13SB29R. The reason for the recall is that the listed lots “may have been improperly loaded. Improper loading may cause malfunctions which may result in damage to the firearm, serious personal injury or death.” CLICK HERE for more information, and to download PDF Recall Notice from Remington.

Remington .338 Recall

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January 22nd, 2012

SHOT Show: New Reloder 33 and Power Pro 1000 from Alliant

When Alliant’s Reloder 17 was introduced, it represented a real break-though in propellant technology. In some cartridges, Reloder 17 delivered significantly more velocity than any other propellant on the market. The secret was a new method of impregnating the powder kernels with burn-controlling compounds. This delayed the initial pressure spike, allowing a longer, more constant powder burn. This effectively delivered more energy over the powder’s full burn cycle, and the extra energy produced higher velocities than could be attained with conventional powders. READ Reloder 17 test report.

Alliant Reloder 33New Reloder 33 Delivers More Speed in Big Magnums
Now Alliant is introducing a new powder, Reloder 33, that uses the same kernel-impregnation technology first pioneered in Reloder 17. Alliant Reloder 33 is a new powder created by Rheinmetall Nitrochemie in Switzerland (Nitrochemie also makes Reloder 17). Like Reloder 17, Alliant’s new Reloder 33 powder employs a proprietary process by which the powder kernels are impregnated with burn-rate controlling elements. This delays the peak pressure spike and smooths out the pressure curve. Effectively, this allows the powder to deliver energy at a more constant rate, producing more overall velocity for the bullet — as much as 150 fps more than with any other powder. Reloder 33 was designed for the .338 Lapua Magnum but it is suitable for other large magnums and ultra-magnums.

In this video, Allliant’s Dick Quesenberry explains the properties of Reloder 33, noting that it should “raise the bar” of velocity for the .338 Lapua Magnum and other ultra-magnums. Outstanding velocities have been achieved in initial tests with the .338 LM. This has attracted the interest of the U.S. Military, which has already placed orders for Reloder 33 in bulk. Reloder 33 should hit the consumer market in mid-April to mid-May, the actual release date depending on DOT transport certification. Expect vendors to have the new powder in stock by the end of May, if not sooner.

Power Pro 1000 for High-Volume Reloaders
In addition to Reloder 33, Alliant is introducing Power Pro 1000. This is a new spherical (ball) powder with a burn rate similar to Alliant 10X. Power Pro 1000 is designs for varmint shooters and .223 Rem shooters who load large quantities of ammo on progressive presses. Power Pro 1000 meters exceptionally well through progressive press powder measures, and it should provide good load density in cartridges such as the .223 Remington. Alliant hopes to release Power Pro 1000 in early- to mid-April.

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January 25th, 2011

SHOT Show Report: Four New Projectiles from Sierra Bullets

Sierra Bullets introduced four new projectiles at SHOT Show 2011: 180gr 7mm MK; 225gr .338 ProHunter; and two new 25-caliber BlitzKings. The much-awaited 180gr 7mm MatchKing, boasts an impressive 0.660 G1 Ballistic Coefficient. This should be great for
F-Classers. Sierra explains: “In response to requests from top level F-Class shooters, Sierra has designed an all-new MatchKing to provide a higher weight/higher B.C. alternative in our 7mm line. This bullet’s 12-caliber secant ogive and lengthened boat tail make it the perfect choice for the discerning 7mm long range shooter. Sierra recommends at least a 1:8″ twist barrel to stabilize this bullet.”

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This new MatchKing will compete with Berger’s vaunted 180gr 7mm VLD. It will be interesting to see how the two 180s perform head to head. If you are shooting a 7mm at long range, you should definitely try out the new .284-caliber Sierra MK (provided your barrel has a suitable twist rate).

Sierra 180 grain MatchKing 7mm .284

New .338 Hunting Bullet and two New .257-Caliber Varmint Bullets
For the hunting crowd, Sierra has released a new .338-caliber bullet and two new .257-caliber projectiles. The new .338 is a 225gr, soft-point, flat-base Pro-Hunter in .338 caliber. Sierra’s goal with this new bullet was to provide a lower-recoiling .338 projectile that still offers plenty of hitting power.

For varminters, Sierra has introduced two new .25 caliber (.257 diam.) BlitzKing bullets, in 70 grain (Part #1605) and 90 grain (Part # 1616) sizes. The 70-grainer is a flat-base design, while the 90-grainer is a boat-tail. According to Sierra, these were created to provide enhanced long-range performance for 25-caliber varmint hunters. We predict the 90-grainer will also be an excellent target bullet. These bullets will be available in boxes of 100 bullets and 500 bullets as indicated below.

Sierra .257 varmint bullets

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January 7th, 2011

New Sierra 7mm and .338 Bullets for 2011

New from Sierra Bullets for 2011 are two new heavyweight bullets. The first, the much-awaited 180gr 7mm MatchKing, boasts an impressive 0.660 G1 Ballistic Coefficient. This should be great for
F-Classers. Sierra explains: “In response to requests from top level F-Class shooters, Sierra has designed an all-new MatchKing to provide a higher weight/higher B.C. alternative in our 7mm line. This bullet’s 12-caliber secant ogive and lengthened boat tail make it the perfect choice for the discerning 7mm long range shooter. Sierra recommends at least a 1:8″ twist barrel to stabilize this bullet.”

This new MatchKing will compete with Berger’s vaunted 180gr 7mm VLD. It will be interesting to see how the two 180s perform head to head. If you are shooting a 7mm at long range, you should definitely try out the new .284-caliber Sierra MK (provided your barrel has a suitable twist rate).

Sierra 180 grain MatchKing 7mm .284

A New 225-grain, .338 Bullet for Game-Hunting
The second new bullet from Sierra is a 225gr, soft-point, flat-base Pro-Hunter in .338 caliber. Sierra’s goal with this new bullet was to provide a lower-recoiling .338 projectile that still offers plenty of hitting power. Sierra tells us: “The newest member of our Pro-Hunter line is the .338-caliber 225gr SPT Pro-Hunter. The flat-based design and lighter weight of this projectile make it a great choice for medium and large game. This is a perfect choice for those hunters seeking a reduced recoil alternative where a heavier bullet is not required.”

Sierra 225 grain Pro-Hunter .338

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May 6th, 2010

Berger Bullets Releases New .338 Hybrid (Dual-Ogive) Bullet

Berger .338 BulletBerger Bullets has just released its new .338-caliber “hybrid” bullet, Berger’s first-ever projectile larger than .30 caliber. The new bullet has a very high ballistic coefficient (BC): 0.891 under the G1 model, and 0.455 under the newer G7 standard for boat-tail bullets. That high BC should translate into exceptional long-range performance. According to Berger, the BC of the new Berger .338 bullet BC is roughly 14% better than the BCs of other .338-caliber 300gr offerings from Sierra and Lapua. This claim is supported by testing done on all three bullets and published in a detailed Bullet Comparison Report (PDF). The new .338 Hybrid bullets will be sold in 50-count and 250-count boxes. To order, call Berger’s Tech-Line, (714) 447-5458.

The key design feature of the new .338 bullet is its hybrid ogive, i.e. a shape that combines both tangent and secant geometry. A tangent ogive meets the bearing surface very smoothly, whereas a secant ogive has an abrupt juncture with the bearing surface. The figure below shows the geometric differences between a tangent and a secant ogive, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each.

Berger .338 hybrid bullet

Practical Considerations — Load Length and Twist Rate
The superior ballistic performance of the 300gr Hybrid .338 is primarily due to the very long ogive and boat tail. However, that super-long bullet length can create some issues. Berger’s new .338 Hybrid bullets are so long that loaded rounds may not fit some magazines comfortably, unless you deep-seat the bullets, which cuts down on usable case capacity. If your loaded rounds with the new .338s are too long for your magazine, single-feeding is recommended. In addition, and this is IMPORTANT, to get optimal performance with the new bullets, you may want to extend the throat in your chamber. This can be done relatively easily by a competent gunsmith using a throating reamer. We caution, however, once the throat is pushed out, you can’t go back to a shorter throat without setting back the entire barrel.

The new .338 Hybrid bullets should stabilize well with a 1:10″ twist at the velocities achievable with popular .338 magnum cartridges. However, according to Bryan Litz, Berger’s Ballistician, at extreme long ranges (beyond one mile), as the .388 bullet goes trans-sonic, it may need more spin. As the bullet slows down into the trans-sonic range, extra stability is required — something you get by spinning the bullet faster. So, for those guys planning to shoot at one mile or beyond, Berger recommends a faster twist-rate. The faster twist provides more spin-stabilization at very long ranges. But for 1000-yard shooting, you don’t need to be concerned about trans-sonic stability. As Bryan explains: “So as long as you keep your shots under 1 mile, the 1:10″ twist is plenty adequate.”

Berger Bullets Video Update (Eric Stecker talks about the new .338 Hybrid and other matters.)
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June 22nd, 2009

New Remington "Space-Gun" Modular Sniper Rifle

Remington has released a new sniper rifle that is WAY different than anything offered from a major American gunmaker, although it shares features pioneered by match-rifle builder Gary Eliseo and others. The new Remington Modular Sniper Rifle (MSR™) features a beefy new titanium receiver with the ability to handle multiple chamberings up to .338 Lapua Magnum. The MSR was designed from the ground up as a switch-barrel rig, with a floating handguard, and folding, adjustable buttstock.

Remington Modular Sniper Rifle

The whole system is modular. By exchanging bolt-face, barrel, and magazine, the gun can switch from .308 Win (7.62×51), to 300 Win Mag, to .338 Norma Mag, and to .338 Lapua Mag. All calibers are available in four barrel lengths: 20″, 22″, 24″, 27″. Barrels are designed to be rapidly interchanged. The trigger is an X-Mark Pro, user-adjustable from 2.5 to 4.5 pounds.

This rifle is Remington’s entry into the competition for the new SOCOM Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR). Big bucks are at stake. The SOCOM PSR contract is potentially a seven-figure deal for Remington. According to Tactical-Life.com, “Remington’s new MSR is so new and so unique that the entire rifle is patent pending. Everything from the triangular-shaped, three-lug titanium action with a 60° bolt throw to the side-folding modular stock was developed specifically for this [SOCOM] solicitation.”

Remington Modular Sniper Rifle

Remington claims the gun delivers good accuracy at ultra-long ranges. Using .338 Lapua Magnum ammo, Remington says its MSR will hold 1 MOA vertical at 1500 meters (1641 yards). While we don’t like the buttstock assembly much (looks like something out of the Transformers movie), it is clear that Remington has done some out-of-the-box thinking with this new rifle. The MSR employs some features that have proven successful with “space-gun” match rifles, such as a tubular, floating handguard, and metal sub-chassis.

Remington Modular Sniper Rifle

To learn more about the Remington MSR, and see a video of the rifle in action, visit RemingtonMilitary.com.

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January 21st, 2009

SHOT Show Report: Forster, Krieger, and Norma Highlights

Many of the companies at SHOT Show had just a few new products or operational changes to report. Here’s a quick summary of news from Forster, Krieger, and Norma.

Forster Products
The only all-new product design from Forster is a collet bullet puller for the Forster Co-Ax press. Conventional screw-in bullet pullers won’t work with the Co-Ax because of the unique jaw design.

.338 NORMA DIES — The new .338 Norma is big news in the long-range tactical game (see separate report in the Bulletin). Forster will have .338 Norma dies available within a few weeks, pretty much “as soon as the Norma brass is in the country.”

Forster has acquired new, advanced die-making machines. This gives the company increased custom die-making capacity. Forster reps noted that Forster can now use any customer-supplied finish reamer to make a custom bushing bump die.

Forster will also roll out a completely redesigned and updated website in mid-February. Visit ForsterProducts.com next month to check it out.

Krieger Barrels
Krieger Barrels has acquired two (2) additional Pratt and Whitney cut-rifling machines. This will give Krieger additional capacity and help them keep up with the high demand for their cut-rifled barrels.

Krieger barrels

Shown in photo, left to right: Neil Leppla, Mike Hindrichs, John Krieger, Helmut Kiesling

AR10 BARRELS — Krieger also announced it will be producing AR10-type barrels in both Krieger-brand cut-rifled and ‘Criterion’-brand button-rifled versions. Krieger will provide AR10 barrels for Fulton Armory, DPMS, and Armalite.

NORMA
NEW 202 POWDER for 6mmBR Ammo — Norma revealed something interesting about its loaded 6mmBR ammunition. Norma has traditionally used Norma 203B powder for 6BR ammo. However, it has found that 203B has gotten progressively slower over the years, so Norma has switched to Norma 202… but not just any 202. Norma has selected the slower batches of 202 for use in its factory 6mmBR ammo. We don’t know if this applies to ALL bullet weights. Norma will continue to use Berger Bullets in its 6mmBR and 6XC match ammunition.

.338 Norma brass

.338 NORMA BRASS Coming Soon — There’s lots of interest in the new .338 Norma cartridge among the military and tactical community. Initial testing has demonstrated outstanding accuracy with 300gr Sierra MatchKing bullets. Many of the folks working with early versions of the .338 Norma believe that, given the case’s superior efficiency, it can rival the ballistics of the larger .338 Lapua Magnum, though the .338 Norma has less capacity. Both cases are derived from the .416 Jeffreys, but the .338 Norma will fit in a shorter action.

Norma is now producing .338 Norma cartridge brass. It is supposed to be in the USA within two to three weeks. It will be distributed though Black Hills Shooters Supply, BHShooters.com. This stuff is in high demand so get your orders in soon.

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