June 15th, 2018

PRS on a Budget? Savage 110 Tactical is Under $630.00

Savage Tactical 110 AccuStock PRS Factory Class

Looking for an affordable PRS Factory Class rifle? Savage has released an updated version of its model 110 that may fit the bill. The new Savage 110 Tactical comes in Grey or Desert Tan in three popular chamberings: 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, and .308 Win. Street price is under $630.00. The 110 Tactical features a user-configurable stock with internal sub-chassis. It also features a suppressor-ready threaded barrel, a one-piece +20 MOA scope rail, and 10-round detachable box magazine. The Savage Accutrigger is adjustable.

Competitors will want to know about barrel configurations. All 110 Tacticals have medium-heavy contour barrels with threaded muzzles (and thread cap). 6.5mm Creedmoor versions sport a 24″ barrel. The 6mm Creedmoor version has a 26″ barrel, while the .308 Win is offered with either 20″ or 24″.

This video tests the 6.5 Creedmoor Model 110 Tactical with multiple ammo types:

Four types of factory ammo were tested in above video: Hornady American Whitetail 129gr, American Eagle 140gr, Hornady Match 140gr ELD, S&B Tactical 140gr FMJ. Three sets of handloads were also tested. These used 130gr Hornady ELD, 130gr Nosler RDF, and 122 Lehigh CC bullets in Hornady brass. All handloads used H4350 powder and Federal primers. Accuracy was not bad with handloads.

Savage Tactical 110 AccuStock PRS Factory Class

Savage AccuFit System for Comb and LOP Adjustments
The 110 Tactical’s AccuFit system lets you customize comb height and length-of-pull with different comb risers and stock spacers that install easily. The AccuStock sub-chassis secures the action three-dimensionally along its entire length. This aids accuracy and shot-to-shot consistency.

Key Features
• AccuFit system for comb height and length-of-pull
• Detachable 10-round Magpul AICS magazine
• Threaded heavy barrel with end cap
• 20 MOA EGW rail
• Gray or Desert Tan synthetic stock
• Tactical oversized bolt handle

Left-Hand Version in .308 Win Only
Savage will offer a left-hand .308 Win version of the 110 Tactical. Sorry southpaw 6mm and 6.5 Creedmoor shooters — for now, only right-hand options are offered for those chamberings.

(more…)

Permalink Gear Review, Tactical No Comments »
June 11th, 2018

What You Need to Get Started in PRS Competition

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list

Report by Craig Arnzen, Area419.com
It’s easy to think about shooting your first precision rifle match and worry about all of the gear and trinkets that you may need to make it through. In reality, the old rules apply — keep it simple.

We wanted to put together for you a no-nonsense list of the Top Five Gear Items you need for your first match. This list focuses on the “must-have” items you’ll need for PRS-Style competitions.

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list support bag dope scope

1. A Rifle (That is Reliable and Sub-MOA Accurate)

Your rifle is the most obvious piece of kit, but we can give you a little more information. Most of the guys you’ll find out there are shooting 6.5 Creedmoor. Yeah, there are guys using .308 Wins and 6mm Dashers, but the 6.5 Creedmoor makes up more than half of the rounds shot in PRS competition, when looking at both national and club matches. Your comp rig needs to be mag-fed and shoot better than 1 MOA. It DOESN’T need to be better than 0.5 MOA (half-MOA). With most targets being 2-3 MOA in size, a half-MOA gun will do just fine. More accuracy is better of course, but you don’t need an exotic quarter-MOA rig to win.

[Editor’s NOTE: PRS does offer a Gas Gun division, but most guys start out with a bolt-action rifle, which will be less maintenance-intensive than an AR-platform rig.]

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list support bag dope scope

Muzzle brakes, like our Area 419 Hellfire, are also very popular as much of the PRS game is recoil management. If you can’t see your misses, you’re sure to have more of them.

The rifle also needs an optic with repeatable clicks and a reticle with Mil- or MOA-based hashmarks. The clicks can be either Mil system or MOA system (Mil is more common), so long as the click values match the reticle (i.e. you don’t want 1/4-moa clicks with a Mil-marked reticle). How much power do you need? Anything that zooms in the mid-teens will suffice. I could shoot a match with a fixed 12X scope and not feel disadvantaged. We love the Kahles K624i, if you’re looking for a suggestion.

Oh, and you’ll want a bipod — but the choice in bipod deserves a whole separate article by itself. Nothing wrong with starting out with a Harris swivel. Then you might look at different bipods on other competitors’ rifles for comparison.

2. Ammunition — Factory Ammo and Hand-loads

Good ammo is important, but as we discuss above, 0.5 MOA is good enough. Also, speed is great but it matters FAR less than you’d think. Drop can be calculated with precision, and distances are normally known, so a slightly flatter trajectory doesn’t really matter. Wind matters, but the difference you’ll find when eeking out that last 50 fps is very, very small.

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list support bag dope ammo ammunition
Federal, Hornady, and Prime all make quality ammo that is widely used by shooters from local to national matches. Facebook photo by CReece.

Precision Handloads
If you want to run down the rabbit hole of finding that perfect ammo that shoots in the “twos” (0.2 MOA), get yourself an AutoTrickler and some of our billet aluminum accessories — you’ll love the setup.

3. A Versatile Support Bag

There are countless bag options. But there is ONE bag you’ll see everywhere, and for good reason. The Game-Changer from Armageddon Gear is aptly named. Many shooters use it as a barricade bag as well as a rear bag, meaning a guy could get away with using only this bag for an entire match. If you need another bag when you get there, ask someone in your squad, they’ll share. I promise.

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list support bag Gamechanger Game-changer Armageddon Gear dope scope

4. DOPE (Reliable Ballistics Info)

We’re not talking the kind of Dope you may find in a match outside Denver — we are talking about the kind that feeds you ballistic solutions. The software-enabled Kestrel is a very common item on the range, but you’ll also see lots of guys using mobile Apps such as Shooter or Applied Ballistics Mobile, and they have great results.

It’s also handy to have an armband or an item like the Hawk Hill data card holder for stages with various targets at differing ranges. Once the RO says “engage” and your mind stops working, you’ll appreciate having it written down.

5. Hearing Protection

PRS Competitors shoot with brakes and sometimes in enclosed spaces. That’s why you need serious hearing protection. We recommend NRR 33 earplugs, doubled up with Electronic Muffs to hear range commands. I have used the 33 dB NRR Mack’s foamies at matches for most of the last year, and the Howard Leight NRR 33 Max-1s are also very effective. The budget-priced (under $50) Howard Leight Impact Sport Electronic muffs work well, but premium electronic muffs may be more comfortable.

PRS Precison Rifle Series getting started equipment list support bag Gamechanger Game-changer Armageddon Gear dope scope

Growing in popularity are high-tech, in-ear digital units like the ESP Stealth. I have a set of linked ESP Steaths on the way and hope to evaluate them soon. These are supposed to be very good, but the ESP Stealths cost $2100.00 per pair!

Think we missed something? Have more questions? Let us know.

Contact: Team@Area419.com

Permalink Competition, Gear Review, Shooting Skills, Tactical 6 Comments »
May 27th, 2018

Register for GAP Grind — The “Granddaddy” of PRS Matches

GAP Grind 2016

The GAP Grind is one of the most popular tactical matches on the planet. So popular, in fact, that this 3-day Pro-Am event will likely “sell out” this year — with more interested shooters than available slots. To ensure you get a spot at the 2018 GAP Grind, which runs October 5-7, 2018, register early. GAP Grind Registration opens June 1st, 2018 at 9:00 am CST. The 2018 Grind will take place at the K&M Precision Rifle Training Shooting Complex in Finger, Tennessee.

Giddings GAP Grind

If you haven’t experienced major PRS Pro-Am event like the Grind, with hundreds of talented shooters, check out this video from ShootingUSA. Show host John Scoutten provides a competitor’s perspective.

Lots of Action, with 20+ Stages
The GAP Grind is a notoriously challenging, “high tempo” match with minimal down-time between stages. Over the course of 20+ stages, competitors will fire 200+ shots at a variety of steel, paper, moving, and reactive targets out to 1,200 yards. Targets vary in size/difficulty based on the shooter’s position, distance, and time allotted. Most stages include “stressors” — i.e. time limits or required movement(s).

Shooting USA TV gap grind
Josh Temnnen Facebook photo

The GAP Grind is held at the impressive K&M Shooting Complex in Tennessee:

GAP Grind 2018 Rules

GAP Grind Hardware
Shelley Giddings, a skilled shooter of both firearms and cameras, snapped these images of state-of-the-art tactical rifles at the 2014 GAP Grind. See more firearms images on Shelley’s Facebook Page.

GAP Grind 2016

Giddings GAP Grind

Giddings GAP Grind

Permalink - Videos, Competition, Tactical No Comments »
February 20th, 2018

One Gun for Hunting AND Competition — Bergara B14 HMR

Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester

For the second year in the row, one of the more popular rifles at SHOT Show was the versatile Bergara’s B14 Hunting and Match Rifle (HMR). Designed for the tactical, PRS, and long-range hunting markets the HMR features an ergonomic, adjustable stock fitted with an internal aluminum sub-chassis. The stock is comfortable in a variety of positions, making it suitable for both hunting and practical shooting comps. The HMR is now offered in five chamberings: 22-250, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5mm Creedmoor, .308 Win, and .300 Win Mag. They all use AICS-compatible box magazines. We’re pleased that all HMRs are guaranteed to produce sub-MOA groups at 100 yards using factory match-grade ammunition. Weight, without optics, is 9.15 lbs, about one pound less than the Ruger Precision Rifle. MSRP is $1,150.00. That’s a good value, but we wish Bergara included a scope rail from the factory.

Watch Video Starting at 6:30 for Bergara B14 HMR (Showing Internal Chassis):

The Spanish-made HMR boasts a molded synthetic stock with built-in machined aluminum mini-chassis. This mini-chassis allows secure, repeatable bedding for Bergara’s B14 action, which features two-lug bolt with coned bolt-head. The Chrome-Moly Bergara barrels are threaded 5/8″ x 24 at the muzzle for brakes or suppressors. The HMR uses a precision-machined bottom metal and is designed to accept AICS-style magazines.

Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester
Bergara HMR rifle PRS production class 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester

The stock has a multi-stage textured finish, which looks good. Designed for both righties and lefties, the ambidextrous stock features an adjustable cheekpiece, and length of pull is adjustable with simple spacers. For slings and accessories, the HMR stock offers multiple flush cup QD mounts as well as multiple swivel studs for bipods and/or slings.

This should be an interesting addition to the line-up of factory rifles suitable for the PRS Series Production Class. But frankly, we think Bergara went too short with the barrels (or at least should offer longer barrels as options). In 6.5 Creedmoor, at 22″ you’re giving up 90 FPS or so compared to a 27″ (See Barrel Cut-Down Test). Additionally, we think most PRS competitors would prefer a different profile on the fore-end. Nonetheless for tactical guys who don’t like modular metal stocks, this is a pretty affordable option that can also work for hunting. NOTE: The new 6mm Creedmoor version does include a 26″ 1:8″-twist barrel. We like that. CLICK HERE for Bergara B14 HMR Owners Manual.

Bergara B14 HMR Rifle Specifications:

Chamberings: 22-250 Rem, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5mm Creedmoor, .308 Win, .300 Win Mag
Action Type: 2-lug action, sliding plate extractor, cone bolt nose and breech
Magazine: AICS style mag compatible – Includes one Magpul® PMAG AICS Magazine
Barrel Specs: 22-250 Rem (1:9″ twist; 24″), 6mm Creedmoor (1:8″ twist, 26″), 6.5 Creedmoor (1:8″ Twist, 22″); .308 Win (1:10″ twist, 20″), .300 Win Mag (1:10″ twist, 26″)
Mini-Chassis Material: 7075 T6 aluminum
Weight without scope: 9.15 pounds
MSRP: $1,150.00

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting 3 Comments »
February 8th, 2018

6.5 Creedmoor Cut-Down Test — Velocity Per Inch Revealed

Rifleshooter.com 6.5 Creedmoor cut-down test

Rifleshooter.com does some great original research — providing “hard data” you can’t find anywhere else. Here are the eye-opening results of Rifleshooter.com’s 6.5 Creedmoor barrel cut-down test. You may be surprised at the results. Read on…

What do you get when you cut a 6.5 Creedmoor-chambered barrel down to just over 16 inches? A lot more velocity than you might think. Our friends at Rifleshooter.com recently did a barrel cut-down test with 6.5 Creedmoor test rifle, shortening the barrel from 27 to 16.1 inches in one-inch increments. Surprisingly, with a 142gr Sierra MK, the total velocity loss (as measured with a Magnetospeed) was just 158 FPS, an average of 14.4 FPS per inch of barrel length. With the lighter 120gr A-Max bullet, the total velocity loss was 233 FPS, or 21.8 FPS average loss per inch of barrel.

» CLICK HERE to SEE All Velocity Values at All Barrel Lengths

To perform this velocity test, our friend Bill, Rifleshooter.com’s editor, built up a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle using a Remington Model 7 action, 1:8″ twist Green Mountain CM barrel, and MDT LSS Chassis, all obtained from Brownells.com.

Test Procedure
Five (5) rounds of each type of cartridge were fired at each barrel length and the velocity data was recorded with a MagnetoSpeed V3 barrel-mounted chronograph. The rifle was then cleared and the barrel was cut back one inch at a time from 27″ to just over 16″. NOTE: During this winter test, the air temperature was a very chilly 23° F. One would expect higher velocities across the board had the outside temperature been higher.

» Read Full Story with All Test Results at Rifleshooter.com

The photo below shows how the barrel was cut down, inch-by-inch, using a rotary saw. The barrel was pre-scored at inch intervals. As the main purpose of the test was to measure velocity (not accuracy) the testers did not attempt to create perfect crowns.

Rifleshooter.com 6.5 Creedmoor cut-down test

6.5 Creedmoor vs. Other Mid-Sized 6.5mm Cartridges
The 6.5 Creedmoor is a very popular cartridge with the tactical and PRS crowd. This mid-size cartridge offers good ballistics, with less recoil than a .308 Winchester. There’s an excellent selection of 6.5mm bullets, and many good powder choices for this cartridge. When compared to the very accurate 6.5×47 Lapua cartridge, the 6.5 Creedmoor offers similar performance with less expensive brass. For a tactical shooter who must sometimes leave brass on the ground, brass cost is a factor to consider. Here’s a selection of various 6.5mm mid-sized cartridges. Left to right are: 6.5 Grendel, 6.5×47 Lapua, 6.5 Creedmoor with 120gr A-Max, 6.5 Creedmoor with 142gr Sierra MK, and .260 Remington.

6.5 Creedmoor Rifleshooter.com velocity barrel cut cut-down test saw blade

When asked to compare the 6.5 Creedmoor to the 6.5×47 Lapua, Rifleshooter.com’s editor stated: “If you don’t hand load, or are new to precision rifle shooting, get a 6.5 Creedmoor. If you shoot a lot, reload, have more disposable income, and like more esoteric cartridges, get a 6.5×47 Lapua. I am a big fan of the 6.5×47 Lapua. In my personal experience, the 6.5×47 Lapua seems to be slightly more accurate than the 6.5 Creedmoor. I attribute this to the quality of Lapua brass.” Now that Lapua offers 6.5 Creedmoor brass with small primer pockets, the 6.5 Creedmoor is even more attractive.

Permalink Gunsmithing, Tactical, Tech Tip 3 Comments »
January 23rd, 2018

Lyman Releases Long Range Precision Rifle Reloading Handbook

Lyman Precision Reloading Manual 6.5 Creemoor PRS Long Range

Lyman Products is offering a new reloading resource, the Lyman “Long Range Precision Rifle Reloading Handbook”. With the growing interest in Precision Rifle Series (PRS) events and Extended Long Range matches, Lyman saw the need for an up-to-date, reliable print resource for precision long range competitors. Lyman says this is “The first-ever reloading manual specifically written for the growing sport of precision long range shooting.”

Lyman’s new book covers the most popular cartridge types, and the premium components used by top shooters. The book covers the vast majority of popular cartridge types used in long range precision shooting. You’ll find .223 Rem, 6mm Dasher, 6×47 Lapua, 6XC, 6mm Creedmoor, .243 Win, 6.5×47 Lapua, 6.5 Creedmoor, .260 Rem., 6.5-284 Norma, .308 Win, .300 Win Mag, .300 Norma Mag, .338 Lapua Mag and more. The data section includes Berger and Lapua target bullets, as well as Sierra MatchKings and Hornady ELDs. A wide range of propellants from Accurate, Alliant, Hodgdon, IMR, Norma, VihtaVuori, Ramshot, and Winchester are reviewed.

Lyman Handbook Includes Articles by Leading Experts and Top PRS Shooters
The new handbook also includes articles by top PRS shooters and industry experts. Articles such as “PRS How-To” and “Rifle Systems for PRS” by Matt Gervais provide expert info and tips and techniques to start competing. An authoritative article by Hornady’s Dave Emary, “The History and Design of the 6.5 and 6mm Creedmoor” explains why these cartridges have become so popular for PRS and other applications. Emary’s “Reloading Considerations for Long Range Ammunition” is also highly recommended for both novice and experienced hand-loaders.

“As the leader in reloading data, we saw a need for an accurate and reliable source of reloading data for these precision, long-range loads,” said Trevor Mullen, Lyman’s Global Marketing VP. “Our process of compiling a new reloading handbook … is to work with the best in their field — reloaders, the manufacturers of ammunition and rifles, participants in the PRS sport, and our own staff of highly-skilled, highly knowledgeable test shooters. This new handbook [will help] those looking for that edge in PRS competitions.”

The “Long Range Precision Rifle Reloading Handbook”, priced at $16.98, will be available soon from online retailers. Within a short time you can also purchase the book from the Lyman web store. (It is not yet in stock).

Permalink Competition, Reloading No Comments »
January 10th, 2018

Load Data for the Popular 6.5 Creedmoor from Sierra Bullets

Sierra Load Data 6.5 Creedmoor

In the past few years, the 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge has become the leading cartridge for tactical/practical gun games. It offers excellent ballistics, moderate recoil, and good accuracy with a variety of powder and bullet combos. Along with the 6.5×47 Lapua, the 6.5 Creedmoor has demonstrated that a .264-Caliber mid-sized caliber is truly a jack of all trades — it can be accurate on paper, win PRS matches, and also harvest game during hunting season. If you own a 6.5 Creedmoor (or plan to get one) and hand-load your ammo, this post should provide a good start. Sierra Bullets now offers 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data for bullets from 120 to 142 grains — the most popular weight range for this chambering.

Sierra Bullets has released very complete load data for the popular 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge. This medium-sized cartridge has become one of the most popular chamberings for tactical and PRS shooters. The 6.5 Creedmoor combines excellent accuracy, good mag-feeding, good barrel life, moderate recoil, and reasonable component cost. That’s why this cartridge has caught on quickly.

The Springfield M1A is now available in 6.5 Creedmoor. For Gas Guns like this, be sure to full-length-size your brass after every firing, with adequate shoulder bump.
M1A 6.5 Creedmoor Sierra Load Data

Sierra Load Data 6.5 CreedmoorDeveloped in 2007 by Dennis DeMille and Dave Emary, the 6.5 Creedmoor is a shortened and improved 30 TC cartridge case that was inspired by the .308 Winchester design. This short action design was created to maximize case capacity and a wide range of loading lengths, while still fitting in standard short action magazines. With the correct twist barrel, the versatile 6.5 Creedmoor can take advantage of the wide range of bullet weights available in 6.5 mm (i.e. .264 caliber). Reloaders should keep in mind that the 6.5 Creedmoor works best with medium to medium-slow powders such as H4350, Varget, Win 760, and RE-17. The light recoil and adaptability of the efficient 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge has already proven itself in high power, precision rifle series and benchrest competitions. Couple that with respectable barrel life and its intrinsic accuracy potential and you have a recipe for success which should insure its legacy for decades to come.

Sierra 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data Manual reloading .264

Here are three tables from the Sierra Bullets Reloading Manual (5th Edition). IMPORTANT — This is just a sample!! Sierra has load data for many other 6.5mm bullet types, including FB, Spitzer, SBT, HPBT, and Tipped MK from 85 grains to 142 grains. To view ALL 6.5 Creedmoor DATA, CLICK HERE.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Sierra Bullets 6.5 Creedmoor Load Data MatchKing Tactical
INDICATES MAXIMUM LOAD – USE CAUTION
LOADS LESS THAN MINIMUM CHARGES SHOWN ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.

Permalink News, Reloading, Tactical 2 Comments »
December 9th, 2017

Springfield Armory Now Offers 6.5 Creedmoor M1A Rifles

springfield armory M1a service rifle m14 6.5 CM Creedmoor

The 6.5 Creedmoor craze goes one step further. Soon you can buy a Springfield M1A chambered for this mid-sized cartridge popularized by PRS shooters. Both bolt-action and AR-platform rifles chambered for the 6.5 Creedmoor have been available for quite some time, but this is a new direction for the M1A, which has traditionally been chambered for the 7.62×51 NATO/.308 Winchester round. As chambered for the 6.5 Creedmoor, Springfield’s M1A should be easier on shooters’ shoulders. The 6.5 Creedmoor M1A has 28% less recoil than the .308 Winchester version.*

The new 6.5 Creedmoor M1A features a 22″ medium-contour, 1:8″-twist stainless barrel with factory muzzle brake. The rifle comes with iron sights: .062 post front sight and .0520 aperture rear sight adjustable for ½ MOA windage and 1 MOA elevation. Springfield ships the rifle with a 2-stage trigger tuned to 4.5 – 5 pounds. A Springfield Armory Optics mount is available to fit a magnified optic, but, to be honest, we haven’t been very impressed with that mount.

springfield armory M1a service rifle m14 6.5 CM Creedmoor

Two stock options are offered: a basic black polymer stock (not recommended — it’s weak and flexy) or a deluxe “precision” stock with adjustable cheekpiece and adjustable LOP. The deluxe precision stock, shown above, is much more rigid, and can be configured with front underside Picatinny rail (see video). Rifle Specs HERE.

With the basic polymer stock, the 6.5 Creedmoor weighs 11.4 pounds (unloaded) and has a $1985.00 MSRP. With the adjustable precision stock, the gun is a bit heavier and retails for $2045.00 in either matte black or Flat Dark Earth (FDE).

“Having a 6.5 Creedmoor caliber in the M1A lineup gives long-range shooters more choices with the precision and accuracy they require,” says Springfield Armory CEO Dennis Reese. “They can choose the round they prefer…”, i.e. .308 Win or the 6.5 Creedmoor. Excellent factory ammo is available for both chamberings.

M1A Camp Perry 2009 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Win Winchester
Photo of 2009 M1A Match at Camp Perry. Shooter is Nick Till, 2007 Service Rifle Champion.

If you are looking for a robust semi-auto rifle that has an interesting legacy (the M1A was derived from the U.S. Military’s M14), this new M1A may suit your tastes. Every year at Camp Perry, Springfield Armory sponsors a very popular M1A match which attracts marksmen from around the country. We can’t say for sure that the 6.5 Creedmoor M1As will be allowed in M1A matches, but we would expect they will, though perhaps competing in a separate division.

Springfield Armory M1A with Basic Polymer Stock
springfield armory M1a service rifle m14 6.5 CM Creedmoor


* Comparative Recoil Energy in ft-lbs based on 12-lb rifle with 142gr 6.5 Creedmoor at 2710 FPS vs. 175gr .308 Win at 2600 FPS. Powder charge weight 41.0 grains for 6.5 Creedmoor vs. 48.0 grains for .308 Win. Calculated with online Recoil Calculator.

Permalink New Product, News, Tactical 2 Comments »
December 7th, 2017

Hardware and Rules for PRS Gas Gun Series

PRS Gas Gun AR15 AR10 Series Semi-auto tactical

Ask most gun guys about the Precision Rifle Series (PRS), and they’ll tell you it’s a discipline for bolt-action “tactical” rifles. Yes that’s true, but PRS now has a “Gas Gun” series as well, and many local PRS-style matches also allow gas guns to compete in their own division.

Capitalizing on the success of the bolt-gun competitions, this year the PRS approved a new Gas Gun series for semi-auto rifles such as AR15s and AR10s. The inaugural 2017 PRS Gas Gun Series competition took place February 17-19, 2017 at the CORE Shooting Solutions range in Baker, Florida. This article explains the basics of the Gas Gun Series and offers some factory hardware options.

PRS Director Shawn Wiseman Explains New Gas Gun Series in this Video:

Gas Gun Series Basics — Interview with PRS President
Shooting Sports USA interviewed PRS President Shawn Wiseman.

SSUSA: What will be the format of the 2017 PRS Gas Gun Series matches?
Wiseman: The matches will be a two day format with 8 to 10 stages per day. There are three Divisions; Tactical Light for 5.56x45mm NATO/.223 Rem. rifles, Tactical Heavy for 7.62x51mm NATO/.308 Win., and Open for everything else up to .30 cal. The maximum distance will be 800 yards.

SSUSA: What guns do you expect to be popular?
Wiseman: In the Open Division, I expect to see a lot of 6.5 Creedmoors for two main reasons; it’s an inherently accurate cartridge and Hornady makes great ammo for the folks that aren’t into reloading. I think the Tactical Light Division will probably be the most popular. It is hard to say specifically what rifles will be the most popular but there are a few AR companies that are known for the accuracy. Armalite, GA Precision, LaRue and Seekins will all be very popular rifles in this Series. I think we will continue to see high-end optics with 5X to 6X zoom range on the rifles. Bushnell, Kahles, Leupold, Nightforce and Vortex will continue to be the most popular.

PRS Gas Gun Series Factory Firearm Options

While you can compete in the Gas Gun Series with an AR15, many Open Division competitors are favoring the larger AR10-platform rifles that can shoot the 6.5 Creedmoor and 6mm Creedmoor cartridges. Both Savage and Smith & Wesson offer AR10-type rifles optimized for this competition.

Smith and Wesson M&P 10, 6.5 Creedmoor

gas gun series PRS

S&W’s AR10-platform rifle is a leading choice for the PRS Gas Gun Division. The M&P 10 in 6.5 Creedmoor shows good build quality and good accuracy with factory 6.5 Creedmoor ammo. If you’re a fan of the 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge, the M&P 10 is a smart gas gun option. S&W offers good customer service and a rock-solid warranty. This rifle features a 2-Stage Match Trigger, Magpul MOE Stock, 15″ M-LOK handguard, and a 20″ barrel with 1:8″-twist 5R Rifling. MSRP is $2035.00.

Savage MSR-10 Long Range, 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Win

gas gun series PRS

The updated Savage MSR-10 Long Range is available now in .308 Win and 6.5 Creedmoor. Next month (January 2018), Savage will also release a 6mm Creedmoor version. This rifle features a Magpul PRS Gen3 Stock, Blackhawk 2-stage trigger, non-reciprocating side charging handle, and QPQ-treated heavy barrel (1:8″ twist for 6.5 Creedmoor; 1:10″ for .308 Win). MSRP for all chamberings is $2284.00.

New .224 Valkyrie for AR15 Platform
Another option would be the smaller AR15 chambered for the new .224 Valkyrie cartridge. This brand new offering from Federal is basically a 6.8 SPC necked down to .224 caliber. With the 90gr Sierra MatchKing, it offers ballistics comparable to a 6.5 Creedmoor, with less recoil.

PRS Gas Gun Series Rules

For the new PRS Gas Gun Series, a committee of top PRS shooters, Multi-Gun shooters, and Match Directors developed the PRS Gas Gun Series Rule Book. Highlights of the Rules are listed below.

PRS Gas Gun AR15 AR10 Series Semi-auto tactical

For the new PRS “Gasser” Competition, the PRS developed rules on gun types, scoring, match timing, penalties, safety and other key topics. CLICK HERE for Full PRS Gas Gun Series Rules.

Open Division: The Open Division rifles will not exceed a caliber of .30 or a velocity of 3,200 fps. A match DQ will result any rounds over the speed limit of 3,200 fps (+/- 32 fps for environmental factors and equipment discrepancies). Match Officials may request at any point during a match that a competitor fire their rifle through chronograph. If the bullet exceeds the 3,200 fps speed limit, the shooter will receive an automatic match DQ.

Tactical Light Division: Intended to allow competitors the opportunity to compete using traditional military and law enforcement caliber (.223/5.56). This promotes Active Duty military and law enforcement competitors use of their Service and Department-issued rifles. Tactical Light Division rifles are restricted to 5.56 NATO/.223 Remington chamberings only. Bullet weight cannot exceed 77 grains and muzzle velocity cannot exceed 3,000 fps.

Tactical Heavy Division: Intended to allow competitors the opportunity to compete using traditional military and law enforcement caliber. This promotes Active Duty military and law enforcement competitors’ use of their Service and Department issued rifles. Tactical Heavy Division rifles are restricted to 7.62 NATO/.308 Winchester calibers only. Bullet weight cannot exceed 178 grains and muzzle velocity cannot exceed 2,800 fps. No modified wildcat rounds permitted to shoot in the Tactical Divisions Anyone discovered violating this rule will receive an automatic Match DQ. Tactical Division shooters will shoot the exact same COF as Open Division shooters.

Permalink News 1 Comment »
November 30th, 2017

How to Get Started in the PRS Game

Tactical Competition Precision Rifle Series

Many of our readers are thinking of trying out PRS-type competition. Tactical matches are becoming more popular every season. Along with F-Class, tactical/practical disciplines are the fastest-growing forms of competitive rifle shooting. Rich Emmons, one of the founders of the Precision Rifle Series (PRS), has written an insightful article about getting started in the tactical game. This will help PRS novices pick the right equipment and understand the game. Here are highlights from Emmon’s “PRS — Intro to Competition” article, originally published on the PRS website. You may also want to read the current PRS FAQ Page.

Precision Rifle Series — Intro to Competition

by Rich Emmons, PRS President
Tactical Shooting with a precision rifle is not like other disciplines, there is no set course of fire or format. That is what makes it so fun!

GAP Grind PRS series
Photo from Ramia Whitecotton’s GAP GRIND 2016 photo album.

First, you have to ask yourself what do you want to accomplish. When I was introduced to long range shooting, immediately a light turned on for me, once I saw how easy it was to hit 300–600 yard targets. What I quickly learned from my first competition and the many that followed was there is so much to learn and shooting in competition put everything you thought you knew to the test. So back to the question: “What do YOU want to accomplish?”. The reality is you may not know yet, you just think it is cool to have a bad ass rifle and scope that can make almost any shot. Now if you’ve got that rifle and scope, it’s time to take it to the next level.

Watch PRS 2016 Championship

Getting Started — What to Expect
If you’re reading this, you have probably already have been bitten by the long range shooting bug. It can seem quite intimidating to just jump in with a new bunch of shooters you don’t know and shooting lingo you don’t quite understand yet. But here is the key — show up and shoot! I guarantee you if you show up to a match as a new shooter, other experienced shooters will guide you along and give you help on anything you need.

AUDIO: Click Button to hear Rich Emmons Talk about the Precision Rifle Series.

Now, a couple things you should just expect. You’re not as good as you think you are. Don’t expect to come into your first match and beat all the veterans. That just doesn’t happen unless you have had some really good coaching or other shooting competition experience to get you ready for this type of competition. If possible, find a local rifle club that has monthly long range matches, or any type of match will help prepare you for a larger PRS event. Getting involved with a rifle club and starting out shooting monthly matches is definitely the way to jump into competition shooting.

Watch PRS 2012 Championship (Click arrows icon to view full-screen version.)

The Gear You Need
The first question that many ask is: “What kind of rifle/caliber/scope do I need?” The easiest answer to this is, the best you can afford. It’s no secret the gear is expensive. It took me several years of buying sub-par gear and eventually trading up to figure this out. Now, a guy can get a real sense of pride of doing it on the cheap, or with a factory rifle. I’ve seen many old Savage 10FPs take down custom rigs that cost 10 times as much. And if that’s all you can afford, then eventually you will learn the limitations of yourself or your gear. As for choice of cartridge/caliber, the respected Precision Rifle Blog has analyzed three years worth of match results (2014, 2015, 2016) from the best tactical shooters in the nation. CLICK HERE to read an article that reveals what the “top guns” use. (CLICK HERE for PRB cartridge survey covering 2012-2014.)

Tactical Competition Precision Rifle Series

Making Good Ammo
Producing quality reloads is something you have to master. It’s not hard at all, you just have to pay attention to detail, and eventually you are going to do something stupid like mis-priming your brass, or skip a row of brass when dumping your powder. Everybody has their own horror story of some reloading failure that cost them a stage or even a match. So load to perfection, work with your rifle to find what load it likes the best, then start your practice.

Tactical Competition Precision Rifle Series

Practice Makes Perfect
You want to become ONE with your rifle, learning everything you can about its functionality. Getting comfortable with the operation of your rifle is key. Learn the feel of your trigger, dry-firing until you wear the paint off your bolt handle. Learn how the rifle works best — pay attention to little things like the sound and feel of the bolt feeding a round from the mag (or when it doesn’t). Learn how to remove a jammed round quickly, learn how to reload a magazine quickly. Learn to scan across a field and find targets in a quick manner, seeing the targets with your eye and coming into the scope on target. These are some of the basic practices that separate the new shooters from the seasoned ones.

Tactical Competition Precision Rifle Series

Tactical Competition Precision Rifle Series

Permalink - Articles, - Videos, Tactical 5 Comments »
November 30th, 2017

New Krieger Pre-Fit Barrels for Ruger Precision Rifle

Krieger Barrels Ruger Precision Rifles Pre-Fit Drop-In Chambered barrel RPR

Own a Ruger Precision Rifle (RPR)? Looking for the single best hardware upgrade that will improve inherent accuracy and shot-to-shot consistency? Here’s your answer. Krieger Barrels is now producing Pre-Fit barrels for the RPR in two popular chamberings: 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Winchester. These “Drop-In Ready” barrels come finish-chambered and threaded to fit the Ruger action. The Ruger barrel attachment system allows correct headspace with a pre-chambered barrel. Krieger explains: “Thanks to Ruger’s proprietary barrel nut design, a competent gunsmith will be able to swap out your barrel using an AR15 barrel wrench and proper headspace gauges.”

Krieger Barrels Ruger Precision Rifles Pre-Fit Drop-In Chambered barrel RPR

Kreiger’s 6.5 Creedmoor RPR barrel is an 1:8″-twist with 26″ finished length, 0.750″ at muzzle. The .308 Win RPR barrel is a 1:10″-twist with 24″ finished length, also 0.750″ at muzzle. Both these Krieger RPR Pre-Fits feature muzzles with factory-spec thread so you can re-install the factory muzzle brake.

LINK: 6.5MM Creedmoor, 1×8 Twist, Muzzle Dia:.750, 26 inch finish length (4.1 lb) Stainless Steel
LINK: 308 WIN, 1×10 Twist, Muzzle Dia: .750, 24 inch finish length (3.7 lb) Stainless Steel

Krieger Barrels Ruger Precision Rifles Pre-Fit Drop-In Chambered barrel RPR

Krieger Barrels Ruger Precision Rifles Pre-Fit Drop-In Chambered barrel RPR

Product Tip from EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink Gunsmithing, New Product, Tactical 2 Comments »
November 14th, 2017

6mm Creedmoor Reloading Data From Sierra Bullets

6mm Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor load data Sierra Bullets

CLICK HERE for Sierra Bullets 6mm Creedmoor LOAD DATA PDF »

Sierra Bullets has recently released load data for the 6mm Creedmoor cartridge, a necked-down version of the 6.5 Creedmoor, a popular PRS, tactical, and hunting cartridge. Sierra has released very comprehensive 6mm Creedmoor load data, covering fifteen (15) different bullets from 55 to 110 grains. NOTE: Hornady-brand brass was used for Sierra’s 6mm Creedmoor load tests, not the newer, stronger Lapua 6.5 CM brass with small primer pockets. Hand-loaders using Lapua 6.5 Creedmoor brass necked to 6mm may have to adjust their loads.

Sierra writes: “As soon as the 6.5 Creedmoor was released in 2007, a 6mm version was being envisioned. After the 6mm Creedmoor demonstrated its worth at 1000 yards it began to catch the attention of Precision Rifle Series (PRS) competitors. The 6mm/6.5 Creedmoor is a great fit for those looking for an AR platform-friendly cartridge. It delivers velocities very similar to the .243 Win and yet fits the AR10 magazine length[.] The 30-degree shoulder makes this a very efficient case and helps prolong case life as well. The 6mm/6.5 Creedmoor works well with powders such as H4350, RE-17, and Ramshot Hunter for heavier long-range bullet weights. Slightly faster powders such as RE-15, Win 760, and Vihtavuori N540 work well with lighter weight bullets.”

Sierra Bullets Tested for 6mm Creedmoor Load Data
55gr BlitzKing (#1502)
60gr HP (#1500)
70gr HPBT (#1505)
70gr BlitzKing (#1507)
75gr HP (#1510)
80gr SBT (#1515)
85gr Spitzer (#1520)
85gr HPBT (#1530)
90gr FMJBT (#1535)
95gr HPBT (#1537)
95gr TMK (#7295)
100gr Spitzer (#1540)
100gr SBT (#1560)
107gr HPBT (#1570)
110gr HPBT (#1575)

In developing its 6mm Creedmoor load data, Sierra tested a very wide selection of propellants, two dozen overall. For the smaller bullets, fast-burning powders such as Benchmark, H4895, and CFE223 were tested. For the heavier 100+ grain bullets, Sierra tested a selection of medium-burn-rate powders including H4350, Reloder 16, Reloder 17, Varget, and Superformance. Sierra did a very thorough job. We know this information will be welcomed by 6mm Creedmoor shooters.

Don’t know what powder to try first? For the 107-110 grain bullets, if you want best accuracy and low ES/SD, our Forum members recommend Alliant Reloder 16 and Hodgdon H4350. If you are seeking max velocity with the 110-grainer, look at Hodgdon Superformance and Reloder 19.

Here are Sierra’s 6mm Creedmoor Load Data Charts for the 107gr MK and 110gr MK. There are a half-dozen other tables for lighter-weight bullets.

6mm Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor load data Sierra Bullets

6mm Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor load data Sierra Bullets

6mm Creedmoor 6.5 Creedmoor load data Sierra Bullets

Sierra Bullets Load Data 6mm Creedmoor reloading tips

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, Reloading, Tactical No Comments »
November 8th, 2017

Dave Emary Retires as Hornady Senior Ballistician

Hornady 17 HMR 6.5 Creedmoor Superformance David Dave Emary Retire retirement senior ballistician

Dave Emary is concluding his 24-year career at Hornady. Although retiring from full-time duties, Emary will continue with Hornady as a consultant. AccurateShooter.com wants to acknowledge Dave’s decades of important work in the gun industry. Brilliant, dedicated, and forward-thinking, Dave has been one of the top minds in our industry for many years. He will be missed. He can claim credit for many of the most important innovations in cartridge and bullet design in recent decades.

Ask Dave Emary what he liked best about his job as senior ballistics scientist at Hornady, and he’d tell you that it was finding better ways to do things. “At the heart of me, I’m a tinkerer,” Emary said.

To borrow an expression from aeronautics, this Air Force veteran is inclined to “push the envelope,” to think outside the box. “I’m not one willing to just go with the status quo,” Emary said.

Over his 24-year tenure with the company, Emary helped accomplish some of the biggest breakthroughs at Hornady. Although Emary said he was merely in the right place at the right time, the list of projects he influenced in one way or another is a long one.

Dave Emary the Innovator
Fans of Hornady products will quickly recognize the names of ammunition lines such as Critical Defense®, Precision Hunter™ and LEVERevolution®, or cartridges like the 6.5 Creedmoor and 17 HMR, but those are just a few of the dozens Emary worked on after being hired as bullet/ammo lab manager in 1994. For his groundbreaking work, Emary was honored as one of Outdoor Life’s Top 25 for Innovation in 2007.

Emary came by his interest in ballistics naturally, growing up on a farm near Wakeman, Ohio, where he began shooting when he was 10 years old. His dad had a .22, and he shot a lot of small game, rocks and other targets of opportunity.


In this 2008 video, Dave Emary talks about the “new” 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge.

Hornady 17 HMR 6.5 Creedmoor Superformance David Dave Emary Retire retirement senior ballistician

Father And Son at the Vintage Sniper Match

Dave Emary was a key figure in starting the CMP’s Vintage Sniper Rifle Match. Dave was instrumental in bringing the new match to fruition and he says his father was his inspiration. Below, Dave Emary and his father Robert reflect on the success of the first Vintage Sniper Rifle Team Match held at Camp Perry.

Vintage Sniper David Emary Dave Hornady

Robert Emary (above right) was a decorated World War II scout sniper who parachuted into Holland after the Normandy Invasion and fought all the way to the Eagle’s Nest. (Photo: CMP The First Shot)

Vintage Sniper David Emary Dave Hornady
Dave Emary was a competitive shooter. This photo shows Dave (left) and “Gunny” R. Lee Ermey (right) shooting the Vintage Sniper Team Match at Camp Perry. (Photo: NRA Blog)

Q and A with Dave Emary

There is an interesting interview with Dave Emary on the Hornady Blog. Dave shares some insider knowledge on how new cartridge types are developed and SAAMI/CIP standardized. And Dave also comments on his favorite new and old cartridges:

Q: Which Hornady rounds have you helped design?

A: This list gets pretty long, Light and Heavy Magnum, A-MAX Match bullets, V-MAX bullets and the Varmint Express line, 450 Marlin, 17 HMR, 204 Ruger, 17 M2, LEVERevolution bullets and ammunition, 308 and 338 Marlin Express, Ruger Compact Magnums, Critical Defense bullets and ammunition line, 6.5 Creedmoor, Critical DUTY bullets and ammunition, Superformance propellants and ammunition. There’s probably some I’ve forgotten.

Q: What is your personal favorite caliber and why?

A: I love the 6.5 Creedmoor. It provides exceptional accuracy along with being very easy and comfortable to shoot. The external and terminal performance offered by 6.5 mm bullets for the ease of shooting is unmatched. At this point in time it is the only bolt action hunting rifle I own. I occasionally pick it up rather than my lever guns to go hunting. It almost seems unfair hunting with it because of how accurate and flat it shoots and how effective it is.

Hornady 17 HMR 6.5 Creedmoor Superformance David Dave Emary Retire retirement senior ballistician

Q: Which historic calibers do you admire and which is the greatest in your view?

A: It’s hard to look past the .303 British and 8×57 because of their tremendous historic significance. I would also rate the .30–06 in with the previous two. The other cartridge I think really started the present day commercial sporting ammunition designs is the 30–30 Winchester. It was one of the first high velocity, smokeless, commercial offerings and lead the way for cartridge development that eventually far eclipsed it.

Dave Emary’s Background — Physics, Astronomy, Air Force Service, and Ballistics
After earning his Bachelor of Science in physics from Bowling Green State University, Dave worked for a year at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in New Mexico before joining the U.S. Air Force. In the Air Force, he earned a second bachelor’s degree, in aeronautical/astronomical engineering. He served for six years, rising to the rank of captain.

After the Air Force, Emary worked at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology’s Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC), the largest ordnance-testing facility in the U.S. outside the government. “That’s where I really got into the ballistics side of things,” Emary said. Among other things, research by Emary and his colleagues led to the development of the electromagnetic railguns now being used by the U.S. Navy that launch projectiles at 4,500 mph.

From there, he went to work for St. Marks Powder in Florida, the nation’s largest gun propellant producer. There, his work caught the attention of Steve Hornady, who offered Emary a job. “Dave had built a reputation as an innovative thinker and problem solver, and I wanted those qualities for our team,” Hornady said.

Dave Emary Returns to EMRTC as Engineering Director
Although he has retired from Hornady, Dave Emary will still use his skill set and vast ballistics knowledge in a new job at a familiar place — as Director of Engineering at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center. EMRTC is internationally recognized in explosives research and testing. For Emary, it’s just his way of easing into retirement.

“I feel incredibly blessed to have been able to be a member of this industry, Hornady Manufacturing and to have been afforded the opportunities I have been given,” Emary said. “I thank the Lord every day for the success I have had, which has been enormously aided by many other people.” — Dave Emary

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, News 4 Comments »
October 25th, 2017

Guns & Gear TV Features 6.5 Creedmoor Smith & Wesson Gas Gun

Ruger Redhawk Revolver

There are some interesting firearms featured this week on Guns & Gear, a syndicated TV show by the creators of Gun Talk Radio. This week, the Guns & Gear team tests a Smith and Wesson M&P 10 chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor. This 6.5 CM version of S&W’s AR10-platform rifle is a leading choice for the PRS Gas Gun Division. The rifle shows good build quality and good accuracy with factory 6.5 Creedmoor ammo. If you’re a fan of the 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge and want to see how it works in a gas gun, the M&P 10 is a smart option. S&W offers good customer service and a rock-solid warranty.

Ruger Redhawk RevolverAlong with Smith & Wesson’s 6.5 Creedmoor semi-auto rifle, Guns & Gear’s crew tests the new Ruger 8-Shot Redhawk revolver in .357 Magnum. That short-nosed wheelgun is one ugly beast, but greater ammo capacity is probably a good thing. Then the crew samples Springfield Armory’s XD handguns. There is also a fun feature on Crimson Trace Master Series Lasergrips. It’s cool to watch the laser beams track from gun to target (see below).

Here is a sneak preview of this week’s Guns & Gear Episode:

Why We Love Wheelguns
We were intrigued by the 8-shot Ruger Redhawk, being avid revolver fans. When we go out plinking with handguns, a classic revolver is often our first choice. This Editor’s S&W model 617 ten-shot .22 LR revolver probably has more rounds through it than all my other handguns. And I have a S&W Performance Center .44 Magnum that has shot 1″ groups at 50 yards (off a rest). I like full-sized revolvers for long sight radius and inherent accuracy of the fixed barrel, combined with the superb trigger break in single-action mode.

Guns & Gear Showtimes
Guns & Gear airs year-round on the Sportsman Channel on Wednesdays at 2:00 PM Eastern, Thursdays at 8:30 PM and 11:30 PM EST, Fridays at 2:30 PM EST, and Sundays at 4:00 AM EST. Find the Sportsman Channel at DirectTV Ch. 605, DISH Network Ch. 395, AT&T U-Verse Ch. 642, Spectrum Ch. 315, and your local cable provider. Watch past Guns & Gear episodes on Gun Talk Media’s YouTube Channel, or visit www.GunTalk.com.

Permalink - Videos, Handguns, Tactical 1 Comment »
October 14th, 2017

Modern Precision Rifle — New from Christensen Arms

Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

Christensen Arms just unveiled a new rifle for PRS competitions and tactical applications. Christensen’s innovative Modern Precision Rifle features an all-new, proprietary chassis system and weighs less than seven pounds (for the 16″-bbl .308 Win version). The Modern Precision Rifle sports high-tech features, such as carbon fiber handguards/fore-end and cheek-piece, and black nitride-coated bolt, receiver, and muzzle brake. The rifle comes complete with a +20 MOA scope rail and a true folding stock with magnetic closure. The Christensen MPR carries a $2295.00 MSRP. That’s a grand more than a Ruger Precision Rifle, but the Christensen MPR’s action runs smoother and the gun is much, much lighter. The fore-end also feel better in the hand and the Christensen Arms rifle balances better than the Ruger.

Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

The Christensen MPR is made from top-quality materials throughout. The chassis is machined from 7075 billet aluminum and features V-block bedding to promote superior accuracy. Other features include an adjustable folding stock with a locking hinge mechanism, and oversized, fluted bolt knob. The Modern Precision Rifle is built with a carbon fiber-wrapped barrel, free-floating handguard, and adjustable comb. The rifle is guaranteed to shoot sub-MOA.

Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

Initial chamberings include 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Winchester in a variety of barrel lengths. Additional calibers, including long-action offerings, are expected in 2018. The Modern Precision Rifle will hit dealers’ shelves within the next 6-8 weeks with an MSRP of $2295.00.

Carbon Components Keep Weight Down
Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

Visit the Christensen Arms website for full specifications, technical drawings, and more photos.

Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

Chistensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle 6.5 Creedmoor .308 Winchester Win Tactical Folding stock PRS gun

Permalink Competition, New Product, Tactical 1 Comment »
October 13th, 2017

NEW — Ultra-High BC 150-Grain 6.5mm MK from Sierra

Sierra Bullets MatchKing 150 grain 150gr high BC G1 G7 6.5 Creedmoor

Up until now, 147 grains was the high end of 6.5 mm (.264 diameter) match bullets offered by major bullet-makers. Now Sierra has “raised the bar” — releasing a 150-grainer with a killer 0.713 G1 Ballistic Coefficent (BC). You read that right — 0.713! Compare that to the 0.626 G1 BC for Sierra’s well-known 142gr MatchKing, 0.697 for the Hornady 147gr ELD Match, and 0.607 for the Berger 140gr Hybrid Target. To increase (and uniform) the BC, Sierra’s new 150-grainer is pointed at the factory. Recommended barrel twist rate is 1:7.5″.

Sierra Bullets MatchKing 150 grain 150gr high BC G1 G7 6.5 Creedmoor

CLICK HERE for 6.5 Creedmoor LOAD DATA for this new 150gr Matchking.

Sierras’ product announcement states: “Shooters … will appreciate the accuracy and extreme long range performance of our new 6.5 mm 150 grain HPBT (#1755). A sleek 27-caliber elongated ogive and a final meplat reducing operation (pointing) provide an increased ballistic coefficient for [reduced wind drift] and velocity retention. To ensure precise bullet-to-bore alignment, a unique bearing surface-to-ogive junction uses the same 1.5-degree angle commonly found in many match rifle chamber throats. This bullet requires a twist rate of 1:7.5″ or faster to stabilize.”

Sierra’s new 6.5 mm 150 grain HPBT MatchKing bullet is available in 100-count boxes (#1755) for $50.98 MSRP, and 500-count boxes (#1755C) for $226.45 MSRP.

Permalink Bullets, Brass, Ammo, New Product 9 Comments »
October 3rd, 2017

New Savage 10/110 Tactical Rifle with Modular Chassis

Savage 10/110 model 10 PRS Stealth Evolution tactical rifle 6mm 6.5 Creedmoor .338 Lapua Magnum

Savage Introduces 10/110 Stealth Evolution in Six Popular Chamberings
Savage has just introduced the new 10/110 Stealth Evolution Chassis Rifle in six chamberings, including the PRS-pleasing 6mm Creedmoor and 6.5 Creedmoor. This rifle will be offered in right-hand and left-hand models. Big Boomer fans can order a .300 Winchester Magnum or the .338 Lapua Magnum.

.223 Rem, 6mm Creedmoor, 6.5 Creedmoor, .308 Win, .300 Win Mag, .338 Lapua Magnum

Savage 10/110 model 10 PRS Stealth Evolution tactical rifle 6mm 6.5 Creedmoor .338 Lapua Magnum

The 10/110 Stealth Evolution pairs a heavy fluted 5R barrel with a monolithic aluminum chassis finished in bronze Cerakote. The hard polymer-ceramic coating resists abrasion, corrosion, and impact damage. The rifle features a factory-blueprinted 10/110 action, matched with user-adjustable AccuTrigger. The Stealth Evolution comes standard with an extra-long top rail and factory muzzle brake. MSRP for standard calibers is $1799.00 (.300 Win Mag $1999.00 MSRP; .338 Lapua Magnum $2149.00 MSRP).

Savage 10/110 model 10 PRS Stealth Evolution tactical rifle 6mm 6.5 Creedmoor .338 Lapua Magnum

AccurateShooter Comment: We like the availability of the 6mm Creedmoor chambering, which is finding favor among many PRS shooters. The 6mm CM has less recoil and a flatter trajectory — plus 6mm bullets are cheaper. Savage did the 6mm version right. At 26″, the barrel is long enough, and the 1:7.5″ twist can stabilize the new 110gr SMKs. That Magpul PRS GEN3 stock looks good — controls are tucked away and the toe can be used with a sand-bag. Some other tactical stocks have rails and/or other “pointy bits” that snag on a rear bag. In .223 Rem or 6mm Creedmoor, this rifle would be a good choice for Prairie Dog safaris. We do wish Savage offered a front sled for bag use though.

Savage 10/110 model 10 PRS Stealth Evolution tactical rifle 6mm 6.5 Creedmoor .338 Lapua Magnum

Permalink New Product, Tactical 3 Comments »
September 29th, 2017

New, Full-Featured $1100 APC Tactical Rifle from Howa

Howa HCR APX American Flag Cerakote 6.5 Creedmoor PRS Tactical Rifle

Howa has introduced a new rifle in a modular chassis, the Howa APC (Australian Precision Chassis) model. Developed for PRS and tactical competitions, this rifle is priced right ($1089.00 starting MSRP) and is offered in a variety of popular chamberings: .223 Rem, .22-250, .243 Win, 6.5 Creedmoor, and .308 Win. In the 6.5 Creemoor Chambering with 26″ heavy barrel, we think this could become quite popular with “Factory Class” PRS shooters. The Howa APC has a smooth-running action, excellent 2-stage trigger, and the affordable MSRP allows $1800 or more for optics. (PRS Factory Class guns must be under $3000.00, combined, for rifle + scope).

Howa HCR APX American Flag Cerakote 6.5 Creedmoor PRS Tactical Rifle

This is a nicely-equipped rifle. All Howa APCs include a 2-stage, creep-free HACT trigger, with three-position safety. The LUTH-AR MBA-4 stock boasts an adjustable comb height, and adjustable LOP from 12.5″ to 16.75″. The rifle is offered with 20″ and 24″ heavy barrels in .223 Rem, .22-250; 24″ and 26″ heavy barrels in .243 Win, and 6.5 Creedmoor; and 20″, 24″, and 26″ heavy barrels in the .308 Win. Threaded barrel options are available. Some models come with a +20 MOA EGW Scope Rail. All Howa ACRs come with Lifetime Warranty and Sub-MOA Guarantee.

Howa APC Features:
• Black 6061-T6 Aluminum Chassis with Hogue Grip
• Free-Float M-LOK Fore-end
• LUTH AR MBA-4 Buttstock Adjustable cheekpiece,
• 2 Stage H.A.C.T. Trigger with 3-Position Safety
• 10 Round Detachable Box Magazine
• MSRP: $1089.00 to $1205.00 for Rifle Only (no scope).

Howa HCR APX American Flag Cerakote 6.5 Creedmoor PRS Tactical Rifle

The Howa APC is also offered in a scoped package with a Nikko Stirling Diamond LR 4-16x50mm scope and +20 MOA EGW rail for optics. The scope has ¼ MOA clicks, zero-stop turrets, and illuminated reticle. Howa APC Scoped Package MSRP: $1,405.00 to $1,565.00.

Coming Soon: American Flag Version
Legacy Sports, Howa’s importer, will soon offer a special American Flag Edition of this rifle, using the same APC chassis but with a USA flag-theme red, white, and blue Cerakote finish and 3-chamber muzzle brake. This special edition is sold with a Nikko 4-16x50mm scope and shipped in a hard case.

Howa HCR ACR American Flag Cerakote 6.5 Creedmoor PRS Tactical Rifle

Howa Sub-MOA Accuracy Guarantee
Howa rifles are guaranteed to deliver sub-MOA performance of 1 inch or less at 100 yards with premium factory ammunition. Guarantee is not transferable. All Howa rifles purchased in the U.S. on or after January 1, 2017 are covered by this offer.

Permalink New Product, Tactical 1 Comment »
September 22nd, 2017

Great Deal on 6.5 Creedmoor Howa for PRS and Tac Comps

Howa HCR Chassis Rifle PRS Tactical Aluminum stock HACT Trigger

Here’s a great deal if you are looking for a smooth-running 6.5 Creedmoor rig in a modular chassis for PRS and tactical competitions. Right now you can get the Howa HCR chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor for just $867.00 at Bud’s Gun Shop (Check, eCheck or M/0 price). The new Howa HCR (Howa Chassis Rifle) combines a Howa 1500 barreled action with a modern, fully-adjustable aluminum chassis. MSRP for this HCR rifle is $1299.00, so this $867.00 price is a great deal for a 6.5 Creedmoor Howa with a very good two-stage trigger and 1:8″-twist 24″ barrel. Other chamberings are: .223 Remington, .243 Winchester and .308 Winchester (price may vary).

Mounted on an AR-style buffer tube system, the Howa HCR utilizes the fully adjustable LUTH-AR MBA-3 stock. Length of Pull is adjustable from 12.5″ to 16.75″. Comb height is also adjustable to fine tune for scope height-over-bore. Weight with a 24″ barrel is 10.2 pounds (before optics), so this Howa HCR is lighter than some similar rifles on the market.

Howa HCR Features

• Howa 1500 Barreled Action with 24″ Heavy Barrel
• Black 6061-T6 Aluminum Chassis with Free-Float M-LOK Forend
• LUTH AR Buttstock with LOP Adjustment (12.5″ to 16.75″) and Adjustable Comb
• 10-RD ACCURATE Detachable, Teflon-coated Steel Magazine
• Two-Stage H.A.C.T. Trigger
• 3 Position Safety

Howa HCR Chassis Rifle PRS Tactical Aluminum stock HACT TriggerThe HOWA HCR features an adjustable, two-stage HACT trigger, set for about 3 pounds (combined stages). Crisp and repeatable, this is an excellent trigger for a factory gun. In our opinion, the HACT trigger is clearly superior to the trigger on the Ruger RPR, as well as the Savage AccuTrigger. And there is no annoying Glock-style safety lever in the middle of the trigger blade.

Also available in .223 Rem, .243 Win, and .308 Win chamberings (price may vary)

NOTE: For all chamberings, 24″ barrels are offered, with 20″ options for the .223 Rem and .308 Win as well. Twist rates are 1:9″ for .223 Rem, 1:10″ for .243 Win, 1:8″ for 6.5 Creedmoor, and 1:10″ for .308 Win. We think .243 Win shooters will NOT be happy with the 1:10″ twist. We would prefer to see a 1:8″-twist for the .243 Win so it can shoot the 105-115 grain 6mm bullets. Most competitive 6mm shooters will want a true 8-twist or even a 1:7.5″.

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September 20th, 2017

Ten More Days to Save $100 on Browning Hunting Rifles

Browning Bucks rebate 2017 hunting rifle A-Blot

Hunting season is coming soon. Here’s a rifle with a smooth three-lug action and good trigger that can take any game in North America. The Browning A-Bolt III is justifiably respected as a solid hunting rifle. This AB3 model with wood stock normally retails for $700.00+. Now it’s on sale for under $549.99 in a choice of five chamberings: .243 Win, .308 Win, 7mm Magnum, .30-06 Springfield, and .300 WSM. What’s more, Browning is currently offering a $100.00 Browning Bucks Rebate for qualifying Browning firearm purchased before September 30, 2017. That drops your net cost for this hunting rifle to just $449.99. But to get this rebate, you have to act soon — you have just ten (10) more days to purchase.

CDNN Sports Browning Bucks Abolt AB3 A-Blot III Composite Stalker Realtree Xtra hunting rifle

You can also purchase this rifle with a “tupperware” black synthetic stock for $349.99 after rebate. Available chamberings at this price include: .243 Win, 6.5 Creedmoor, .270 Win, 7mm-08, 7mm Rem Mag, .308 Win, .300 WSM, .30-06 Sprg, 300 Win Mag. The .270 Win and .30-06 versions are also available with Realtree Xtra Camo (above) for the same $349.99 after-rebate price.

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