January 10th, 2019

Savage Will Launch 40 New Products at 2019 SHOT Show

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage will launch 40 new products at the 2019 SHOT Show in Las Vegas. This will be a big year for Savage as 2019 marks Savage’s 125th Anniversary. The brand is celebrating the historic event by offering limited-edition rifles as well as many new offerings in bolt-action rifles, AR-platform rifles, and shotguns. “Whether you are looking for a training rifle, a competition-grade modern sporting rifle, a reliable shotgun for hunting or personal defense, or a lightweight hunting rifle packaged with a scope, Savage has those needs covered, plus more”, said Savage’s Marketing Director, Beth Shimanski.

New 2019 Product Launch Highlights

The company is expanding and improving its popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock. The AccuFit system lets shooters quickly adjust comb height and length-of-pull. The feature is an integral part of a new long-range rifle with a superior finish, the 110 High Country, featured below:

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles
Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage is expanding the popular XP scoped rifle lines. New models include the 110 Apex XP series, featuring Vortex scopes, and a pint-sized Rascal Target XP. Plus, the existing AXIS XP series has been upgraded with a new modernized stock.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage’s MSR 15 and MSR 10 AR-platform rifle series will include new options for long range, precision and competition shooting. These rifles are not cookie-cutter AR clones. The MSR Savages have some interesting upgrades, such as side-charging handles (on MSR 10), Magpul PRS stocks, adjustable gas blocks, and tunable muzzle brakes. The MSRs also enjoy a good reputation for build quality and reliability.

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

Savage Arms 2019 new rifles Axis II MSR AR15 PRS hunting rifles

All of these new rifles, as well as more bolt-action and semi-automatic centerfire and rimfire rifles, will be on display at SHOT Show Booth No. 14551 January 22-25, 2019 at the Sands Expo Center.

Permalink Gear Review, Hunting/Varminting, New Product 1 Comment »
November 26th, 2016

On the Level — Use Your iPhone’s Leveling App at the Range

iphone level app application bubble

iphone level app application bubbleMany shooters are familiar with ballistics tables, weather programs, and even wind meters for smart devices, but few may know about a very handy Leveling Tool that comes factory-installed on Apple iPhones. The leveling function is a little-known option in Apple’s Compass App. It works well for a multitude of tasks.

There are a numerous reasons that a leveling tool should be in every rifleman’s range bag. From leveling optics during mounting to figuring out how much extra compensation is going to be required for a tricky angled shot, knowing just how far off things are from plumb can go a long way towards realizing success in the field.

This writer has used the leveling app on his iPhone to level a rifle on a rest while at the range. It definitely worked for “field expedient” leveling duties. That’s especially important for long-range applications. Just one degree of cant (tilt) can move your point of impact 7 inches at 1000 yards.

Of course, the iPhone level doesn’t use an actual bubble to find angles. Rather, it relies on the device’s sophisticated accelerometer to do so, and with a great degree of accuracy. Navigating to the level is done by first selecting the Compass App, at which point the device will need to be calibrated by rotating it a full 360 degrees. Once the compass is fully calibrated, simply make right swipe gesture to bring up the level — it will start operating immediately.

iphone level app application bubble

From there, use is intuitive and easy, like most iPhone Apps. Switching from horizontal plane to vertical is done by simply changing the physical axis of the phone. How do you know when you’ve got things just right — well the entire lower half of the screen turns green when everything is perfectly level. You’ll also see a zero° read-out, like this:

iphone level app application bubble

Bottom Line: If you already own an iPhone, you should definitely give this App a try. The price is right (free), and for a wide variety of tasks the iPhone Level App is actually pretty handy.

Permalink Gear Review, Tech Tip 2 Comments »
September 10th, 2011

New Timney Trigger for Savage Axis/Edge Rifles

Timney Triggers has introduced a new drop-in trigger for the Savage Axis/Edge line of rifles. The new Timney Axis/Edge trigger (Model 633) is CNC machined from solid steel and then case-hardened. The Model 633 Axis/Edge trigger fully adjustable for pull weight, sear engagement (creep) and over-travel. The trigger’s pull weight can be adjusted from 1.5 to 4 pounds, an ideal range for a hunting rifle. Midsouth Shooters Supply has the Model 633 trigger in stock now.

Timney trigger Savage Axis Edge

The Timney Axis/Edge trigger retails for $104.95 for the standard blued version and is also available nickel-plated for $114.95. Each trigger is hand-assembled, calibrated, and tested before shipping. Timney offers a lifetime warranty on all of their products. Triggers are Made in the USA.

Story tip by EdLongrange. We welcome reader submissions.
Permalink New Product No Comments »
February 15th, 2009

Canted Reticles — Serious Problem Needs to Be Addressed

Unfortunately, we still see too many scopes sold to the public with canted reticles. The problem of canted reticles is a serious issue that some manufacturers (both domestic and foreign) have failed to address. (Note: here we are talking about an INTERNAL scope assembly problem that results in reticles being off-axis relative to the turrets. Don’t confuse this with the canting which occurs if you don’t level your rifle. A canted reticle is a scope production defect requiring factory repair.)

One degree of scope reticle cant is noticeable. Three degrees is “slap in the face” obvious and, frankly, pretty unpleasant to work with. Unfortunately, three degrees happens to be one major domestic scope-maker’s production tolerance. And sure enough, you can find this company’s scopes in retail outlets with the reticles located a full three degrees off-axis.

We believe that badly canted reticles are unacceptable in a high-dollar scope, one costing more than $450.00. Optics-makers — it’s high time to improve your quality control.

Three degrees may not sound like much–after all it is less than 1% of a 360-degree circle. Nonetheless, as the diagrams show, three degrees of cant is VERY noticeable in a scope. In fact, most people will be bothered by a reticle that is just one degree off-axis. Canted reticles are not just annoying to look at, but off-axis reticles cause a number of problems with sighting and accuracy. For example, if you set up your rifle so the vertical cross-hair is straight up and down, your turrets will be slightly tilted. This means that when you click elevation you will change windage slightly, and vice-versa. If, on the other hand, you cant (or tilt) the whole rifle to make the turrets square, this throws off the bullet trajectory–causing bullet impact that is low and displaced horizontally*.

Now, all manufacturers can have a production flaw now and then. Yet we’ve never heard a complaint about canted reticles in Nightforce, U.S. Optics, or Schmidt & Bender scopes. So, it IS possible for the better manufacturers to get it right. Our point here is that it is time for the major scope-makers to address this problem and improve their quality control. That will happen sooner if consumers pay greater attention to reticle alignment during the purchasing process. If you have a scope with a canted reticle, send it back to the maker and ask for the problem to be fixed. If enough shooters do that, we expect the scope-makers will take notice and improve their products.


*CLICK HERE to read a very thorough technical article that explains the effect of rifle canting on bullet trajectory. CLICK HERE to see targets shot with canted rifles showing bullet displacement. The diagram below shows how this occurs.


Illustration courtesy Long Shot Products, Ltd.

Permalink Optics 10 Comments »